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President Trump    Associated Press photo

A boffo performance on the road

- The Washington Times

The Donald finally catches a break. His trip to the Middle East was planned weeks ago, long before the sacking of James Comey and the media transformation of the voluble sackee from goat to hero. The opportunity to get out of Dodge arrived just in time.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of May 23, 2017

Population death spiral

It is hard to succeed if everyone is leaving. Some of the former communist countries are suffering from a population death spiral, with double-digit population declines over the last 25 years, as can be seen in the enclosed table.

In this May 18, 1971 file photo, political consultant Roger Ailes, who died last week, is shown in his office in New York. From communications guru and TV producer to Chairman-CEO of Fox News Channel, Ailes' used a "fair and balanced" branding approach, targeted at viewers who believed other cable-news networks, and maybe even the media overall, displayed a liberal tilt from which Fox News delivered them with "unvarnished truth." Associated Press photo

The genius of Roger Ailes

Roger Ailes was no genius, not in the league of Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein. The founding chairman of Fox News Channel, who died last week from complications after suffering a fall, understood and respected Middle America from whence he came.

Illustration on the notion of government subsidy of nuclear power by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why nuclear power subsidies must end

Should utility bills and taxes be used to subsidize money-losing nuclear power plants so they can compete with renewable energy and low-cost natural gas?

Even the Walls have Ears Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A conversation with Condoleezza Rice

On Wednesday, I sat down with former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to discuss her new book, “Democracy: Stories From the Long Road to Freedom.” The following transcript has been edited for length and clarity.

Un-Happy Meal From High Minimum Wage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How a CEO misapprehends the minimum wage

Last week, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg made headlines for her Mother’s Day post calling for a minimum wage increase. “It’s long past time,” she claimed, “to raise the federal minimum wage.”

Seth Conrad Rich, a DNC staffer, was killed in July near his home in the District of Columbia. (Image via Rich's LinkedIn profile.)

The strange case of Seth Rich

- The Washington Times

This is the unfortunate story of the killing of a young man named Seth Conrad Rich, a Nebraska-born and -reared young man whose death by two gunshots has resulted in conspiracy theories of the worst kind.

Illustration on imprisoned felons on the voter rolls by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

The ACLU’s army of ex-cons

Not content with filing nuisance lawsuits all over the country, most of them aimed at thwarting the Trump administration, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is plunging into local political campaigns.

Illustration on Trump's potential effect on economic growth by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Moving toward 3 percent growth

President Trump’s economic team paints a rosier picture about what his policies could accomplish than the economics profession is willing to endorse.

Illustration on Iran's threat to an independent Kurdistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An independent Kurdistan

In order to assist the creation of a Shia Crescent from the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean Sea, the question remains: Is Iran working to thwart the creation of an independent Kurdistan? Are they working together with Syria in order to further this strategic goal? According to an Iraqi source, Iran is working to thwart the creation of an independent Kurdistan by trying to instigate a civil war among the Kurds by supporting groups opposed to Masoud Barzani. They are doing this because they perceive Kurdish autonomy in Northern Iraq to be a threat and they view the internal divisions among the Kurds to be the most effective way to destroy the dream of an independent Kurdistan for the Kurds presently are not united.

Product of Venezuela Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cry for me, Venezuela

I often say only half-jokingly to students on college campuses who are all in with Bernie Sanders that if they think socialism is such a wonderful economic model: how about a one-way ticket to Caracas?

Higher Temperature Readings Equal More Money Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Degrading Earth’s future climate

Best practice in science is achieved through a minimum of two critical conditions: humility and perspective. If humility and perspective are ignored, science suffers.

President Donald Trump smiles as he listens to Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, speak during a news conference in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Destroying Donald Trump is all that matters in the newsrooms of the mainstream media

- The Washington Times

Now anything goes. All restraints are loosened, all self-discipline trashed. There’s no cure or even treatment for Trump Derangement Syndrome, a disease as wild and as swiftly lethal as anything imported from the Ebola River valley of the dark continent. The rules and taboos that once guided even the sleaziest excuse for a newspaper no longer apply.

Illustration on the crisis in Venezuela by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Venezuela’s self-made crisis

Time is running out for Venezuela, a nation of 31 million with perhaps the world’s largest proved reserves of crude oil. The consequences of its descent for its neighbors and for the United States, whether into dictatorship, civil war, or bloody chaos, demand an immediate response — well beyond the call for dialogue, partial targeted sanctions, and resolutions.

Related Articles

In this May 16, 2017, photo, President Donald Trump welcomes Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan to the White House in Washington. The Trump administration faced growing calls Thursday for a forceful response to violence by Turkish presidential guards on American soil, who were briefly detained this week but then set free. The unseemly incident added to U.S.-Turkish tensions that are being compounded by a growing spat over U.S. war strategy against the Islamic State group in Syria. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

No use trying to satisfy demanding Democrats

A close relative shared with me his thoughts on the odd situation we find ourselves in these days, where Republicans are in charge of the Congress and the White House yet it feels as if the minority Democrats are running the show.

U.N. Secretary General Antonio Guterres, center, addresses the European Parliament, while EU Parliament president Antonio Tajani leaves in Strasbourg, eastern France, Wednesday, May 17, 2017. (AP Photo/Jean-Francois Badias)

EU deepens its own crisis with attacks on Hungary, Poland

The European Parliament has condemned Hungary for human rights issues and a breakdown of the rule of law. Brussels is now threatening all-out financial war against both Hungary and Poland, among others, for alleged human rights abuses and anti-democratic policies and actions. But with conservative governments insisting on their sovereign right to protect their borders and preserve their national identities, Europe is headed for an existential crisis from which it may not recover in its current form.

In this Sept. 13, 2016, file photo, House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Rep. Jason Chaffetz, R-Utah, speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Molly Riley, File)

Jason Chaffetz's right: Where's the memo, Mr. Comey?

- The Washington Times

House Oversight and Government Reform Committee Chairman Jason Chaffetz, in a Thursday "Good Morning America" interview, wondered aloud where the now-famous James Comey memos were -- and whether the fired FBI director really was going to release them for public viewing. These are good questions. The American public has a right to see the so-called evidence being used to take down President Donald Trump.

In this May 3, 2017, file photo, FBI Director James Comey listens on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Comey: Higher-ups never asked for halt to FBI investigations

- The Washington Times

James Comey, just-fired FBI director, said in a Senate hearing earlier this month that he's never been asked by higher-ups to back off an investigation for political reasons, an interesting remark given the fact President Donald Trump's now being accused of that very thing.

In this May 4, 2017, file photo, the U.S. flag flies in front of the Capitol dome on Capitol Hill in Washington. A North Korean parliamentary committee sent a rare letter of protest to the U.S. House of Representatives on Friday, May 12, 2017, over its new package of tougher sanctions. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

A dumb amendment for a dumber age

May 20 marks 25 years since the 27th Amendment to the Constitution was declared ratified -- more than 200 years after it was first proposed to the states.

Scotland's First Minister Nicola Sturgeon talks, during First Minister's Questions at the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh, Thursday May 11, 2017. Britain will hold a general election on June 8. (Jane Barlow/PA via AP)

The big hack attack and the NHS

The ransomware cyberattack that wormed its way into at least 74 countries recently exposed new vulnerabilities in the United Kingdom's National Health Service (NHS), as if it weren't vulnerable enough.

Mexico's President Enrique Pena Nieto, top left, pauses while speaking to the press, at the end of a press conference where he announced measures intended to protect journalists, in Mexico City, Wednesday, May 17, 2017. Pena said he is taking actions to halt slayings of journalists, without giving specifics, and promised more resources to help those under threat. Past measures have been ineffective in stopping the bloodshed among the country's media workers. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell)

When the press plays 'gotcha,' nobody wins

It's a difficult time to be proud of everything about America. The president is vilified from all sides (some criticism deserved, some not), and what's difficult to defend is the democratic process as we've used it to produce both the likes of Donald Trump and the press that rushes like lemmings to judgment.

Contraception in Catholic Colleges Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Catholic collegiate contraception complicity

President Trump's latest executive order titled "Promoting Free Speech and Religious Liberty," potentially ends the enforcement of the Obama administration's Health and Human Services (HHS) contraception mandate requiring all employers -- including religious institutions -- to provide health insurance that covers contraception.

Illustration on the challenge of Middle East peace negotiations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Five steps toward achieving Middle East peace

Donald Trump's decision to visit Saudi Arabia during his first overseas trip as president creates the perfect opportunity for his administration to take positive steps toward addressing five key needs in the region.

Trump Still Has All His Marbles Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Turning political disagreement into a disease

How could legislators get rid of a president who appalls them but who has not committed high crimes and misdemeanors, the conventional legal grounds for impeachment?

Illustration on investigating government leaks by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Donald Trump's seven days in May

In a period of seven days this month, President Trump fired James Comey as director of the FBI and was accused of sharing top-secret intelligence data with the Russian foreign minister and the Russian ambassador to the United States, the latter a known Russian spy.

Political 'twilight zone'

Welcome to the real-life twilight zone. During the first scene you'll notice the Islamic immigration policies of Western nations. The general populace in these in these countries does not desire these policies, yet the governments force them on their people -- despite the fact that they bring an increase in crime and political demonstrations. Notice that the news media promotes these policies and keeps silent on immigrant crimes, such as rape of native women.

Impeachment would backfire

The "deep state" has done everything imaginable to destroy a man, our president, any way it can. The entrenched dishonorable people within the government who have provided classified information to the mainstream media in this effort are symbolic of a broken government operating by the Obama/Clinton rules of extra-constitutional governance.

President Donald Trump walks across the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, May 17, 2017, following his short trip on Marine One from nearby Andrews Air Force Base, Md. Trump was returning to Washington after speaking at today's U.S. Coast Guard Academy Commencement Ceremony. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The anonymous 'heroes' of the Resistance

Anonymous sources may not always be reliable, but they're always convenient. More than that, anonymous accounts are usually made of putty, soft and easily shaped. Not only that, an anonymous source never claims he was misquoted. He never demands a correction or a retraction. The Washington Post, which deals in anonymous sources for many of its blockbuster disclosures, is particularly skilled at working with anonymous sources, and gets more out of them than almost any other newspaper.

Demonstrators hold candles during a vigil for the victims of the clashes with the government's security forces, during protest against President Nicolas Maduro in Caracas, Venezuela, Wednesday, May 17, 2017. Several humanitarian organizations and the opposition have accused the security forces of using too much violence during demonstrations against the government, which have left dozens dead.(AP Photo/Ariana Cubillos)

The deadly peril in Venezuela

If Venezuela burns, the United States will feel the heat. Like a nearby brush fire, the Venezuelan civil war threatens to erupt in a conflagration that will disrupt life throughout the hemisphere. Americans are accustomed to watching tinderboxes from half a world away, but this one is too close for comfort.