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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, in Melbourne, Fla. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Voting for growth

Voters must shake up Washington if they want a more prosperous future.

FILE - In this Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016 file photo, a soldier from the 1st Battalion of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces listens to an address by his commander after a training exercise to prepare for the operation to re-take Mosul from Islamic State militants, in Baghdad, Iraq. The disparate groups that make up Iraq's security forces are converging on the city of Mosul, lining up for a battle on the historic plains of northern Iraq that is likely to be decisive in the war against the Islamic State group(AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo, File)

What to do when a ‘narrative war’ fails

Apologies to White House spokesman Josh Earnest, who this week claimed we are in a “narrative war” with the Islamic State, or ISIS, but here’s the only narrative that the current crop of jihadists will understand: “When I am president of the United States, I will be eager and able to unleash on you history’s biggest, baddest collection of warriors, and should you choose to oppose them on the battlefield, they will kill you and break your stuff. Guaranteed.”

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's bellicose attitude by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the Donald is the dove

It’s interesting when a longtime Democrat and long-ago speechwriter for John and Robert Kennedy declares he will vote for Donald Trump. That’s what Adam Walinsky did in Politico Magazine the other day. It’s even more interesting when hostile Democrats rush to defend Hillary Clinton from Mr. Walinsky’s attack, as Peter Beinart did in an article in The Atlantic calling Mr. Walinsky’s piece an “absurd and dishonest essay.”

Egg Shell Helmet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Inmates’ defective work

A scathing report of a joint investigation by the Justice Department’s Inspector General and the Defense Criminal Investigative Service found that the Bureau of Prisons’ Federal Prison Industries (FPI) produced more than 100,000 combat helmets that were defective and would “likely cause serious injury or death to the wearer.”

Fresh Start Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The human face of overcriminalization

A young man from a low-income family sells small amounts of marijuana when real opportunity eludes him. He’s arrested and incarcerated several times. After being convicted and serving his sentence, he leaves prison with a record that will follow him for the rest of his life.

Illustration on the Colombia peace accord and cocaine exportation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Purchasing peace with cocaine?

Ninety-five percent of the cocaine sold on the streets of the United States today comes from Columbia. What’s more, the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, the State Department and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime all agree that the cultivation of coca, the plant used for making cocaine, is surging again in Colombia

John Kennedy     Associated Press photo

Goats in the White House

- The Washington Times

It’s the conceit of every age that it’s uniquely entitled to all the superlatives: it’s the best, the worst, the biggest, the smallest. Nothing before was anything like the present age, nor is it possible that anything in the future will surpass it.

Illustration on the potential political rift presented by the upcoming election by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When an election produces a political realignment

What do the election years 1800, 1828, 1860, 1896, 1932 and 1980 have in political common? They are usually described as “critical” or “realigning” elections by historians who argue they produced a significant realignment in our political system.

President Barack Obama speaks at the 2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference held in the Mellon Auditorium in Washington, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Another useless Iraq surge

Pessimists and cynics are annoying, mostly because events prove them to be right far more often than they are proven wrong. Sometimes pessimism is the necessary result of an examination of history.

Illustration on new moves toward animal liberation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Food for thought about animal liberation

Peter Singer, Princeton professor and author of the book “Animal Liberation,” will be taking his radical views center stage at the upcoming “The Future of Food” event in Washington, D.C. Hosted by the extremist Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the choice of Mr. Singer to keynote the event offers a peek at just how out of touch animal liberation activists are: While Mr. Singer is against eating animals, he’s OK with the idea of having sex with them.

The Second Jacksonian Revolution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When ‘deplorables’ took back their country

The 1829 inauguration of Andrew Jackson ranks as the most raucous in American history. Presidents in those days traditionally held open house for the general public after being sworn in, but no one anticipated that hordes of Jackson’s rough-and-tumble supporters would descend on the nation’s capital for the big day or that they would troupe over to the White House following his inaugural address to shake his hand and guzzle free booze.

Growing the American Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to jump-start the economy

As the presidential debates get underway, we hope that the moderators set personalities aside and spend some quality time asking questions of both candidates about their plans to grow the American economy.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves to the crowd during a rally in Roanoke, Va., Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Trump faces Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton in the first of three debates Monday.  (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Terrorism, refugees and Donald Trump

Hilary Clinton’s refugee plan is an open invitation for Radical Islam’s unyielding nature to run roughshod over American culture.

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Left's selective OK of ID

With the 2016 presidential election approaching, Democrats' attempts to restore voting rights for convicted felons and dismantle voter-ID laws exposes a discredited left desperate to increase turnout by racially manufacturing and exploiting the "voter suppression" fallacy.

Illustration on Maine politics byAlexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A 'blue' state where Republicans see cracks

In the mountains of Western Maine, the leaves are only just now starting to turn, which means they're on schedule to display riotous color despite a summer drought that has lowered some lakes by more than four feet.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves to the crowd during a rally in Roanoke, Va., Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Trump faces Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton in the first of three debates Monday. (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

A single for Donald Trump

There's baseball tonight, and politics, too. Politics, like baseball, is a game of inches. A called strike, two inches within the strike zone, a fly ball that clears the left-field fence by three inches. A tag at third base misses by four inches. An inch here and two inches there, and a late-inning rally ruined.

BOOK REVIEW: 'House Revenge'

This is the story of Elinor Dobbs a little elderly woman in a yellow raincoat who took on the joint power of political and financial corruption in her fight to stay in her ramshackle flat.

Charlotte police encountering protesters earlier in the week.           Associated Press photo

A riot that dares not speak its name

- The Washington Times

Charlotte is the conversation we're getting about race in America, with rioting, death and looting, encouraged by the noise of the mob, the purple rhetoric of certain newspapers, bloody mayhem on the television screen, and encouragement, no doubt unintended, by the president of the United States. It's a carnival out there, but not much conversation.

A study in nuclear contrast

Astudy in contrast: North Korea is killing itself to get an atomic bomb; Kazakhstan is rich because it gave its nukes away.

President Barack Obama greets people in the audience during a ceremony East Room of the White House, Thursday, Sept. 22, 2016, in Washington, after awarding the 2015 National Medals of Arts and 2015 National Humanities Medals. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The president's farewell tour

Sarah Bernhardt, the French superstar at the end of a career as "the most famous actress the world has ever known," famously set out on a farewell tour that was so successful she repeated it, several times.

Rep. Lewis deserves medal

The Philadelphia Liberty Medal is a highly reputable prize. Rep. John Lewis of Georgia is an excellent choice for this year's recipient ("John Lewis awarded Liberty Medal for civil rights work," web, Sept. 19). The prize has an established history and Mr. Lewis is an effective congressman.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks during a campaign stop in Orlando, Fla., Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016.  (Joe Burbank/Orlando Sentinel via AP)

Answers for Hillary

Hillary Clinton is smart -- she has the academic credentials to prove it -- but she can't figure out why she isn't scoring above 50 percent in the public-opinion polls. Life on the hustings just ain't fair.

Call terrorism by its name

When will terrorist actions actually be called terrorism by the leaders of this country? After the explosion in New York City, Gov. Cuomo stated that there was no evidence of international terrorism connected to it.

Protesters surround a police vehicle in Charlotte, N.C. on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. Authorities used tear gas to disperse protesters in an overnight demonstration that broke out Tuesday after Keith Lamont Scott was fatally shot by an officer at an apartment complex. (Jeff Siner/The Charlotte Observer via AP)

Rioting in North Carolina

Black lives matter, and they matter so much that everyone, black or white, is responsible for protecting them. That begins with demanding that "demonstrators" and "protesters" pay a little respect to the black lives they say they honor.