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Illustration on the childhood risks in contact sports by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Weighing the childhood risks of contact sports

The incidence and severity of brain injury is one of the hottest topics in sports media today, and it is creating a storm of near-panic in youth sports — especially football. We worry that the public’s misunderstanding of the available medical research is the gravest threat facing organized contact sport at the youth and high school levels.

Dire predictions about Citizens United prove false

Five years ago last week, Justice Anthony Kennedy wrote in the landmark Supreme Court decision, Citizens United, that “the worth of speech ‘does not depend upon the identity of its source, whether corporation, association, union, or individual.’” The government, the court affirmed, cannot censor or ban the political speech of individuals simply because they organize themselves as a corporation or labor union.

M1903 SPRINGFIELD - formally the United States Rifle, Caliber .30-06, Model 1903, is an American clip-loaded, 5-round magazine fed, bolt-action service rifle used primarily during the first half of the 20th century. It was officially adopted as a United States military bolt-action rifle on June 19, 1903, and saw service in World War I. It was officially replaced as the standard infantry rifle by the faster-firing semi-automatic 8 round M1 Garand starting in 1937. However, the M1903 Springfield remained in service as a standard issue infantry rifle during World War II, since the U.S. entered the war without sufficient M1 rifles to arm all troops. It also remained in service as a sniper rifle during World War II, the Korean War, and even in the early stages of the Vietnam War. It remains popular as a civilian firearm, historical collector's piece, and as a military drill rifle.

World War II’s only execution for desertion

Seventy years ago tomorrow, Private Eddie Slovik (1920-1945) became the first and only soldier since the Civil War to be executed for desertion, a military offense that has recently surfaced in the news about Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.

Illustration on accurately identifying Islamist terror by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Freedom, security — and the truth

With blizzards, deflated footballs and green-lipsticked YouTube personalities dominating recent news, it was easy to miss two hugely important truth-telling moments. If only they had received the same coverage as air pressure in NFL regulation footballs.

Eric Rose, 6, from Ellwood Christian Academy, in Selma, participates in a National School Choice Week rally at the Alabama State Capitol, Wednesday Jan. 28, 2015, in Montgomery, Ala. Parents and students rallied on the lawn of the Alabama Capitol Wednesday, urging state politicians to provide more publicly funded education options.(AP Photo/Hal Yeager)

Busting myths about school choice

The implementation of school choice is sure to become much more popular as the myths surrounding race, religion, and student outcomes are continually disproven.

A New York City snowplow, loaded with salt, sits parked in midtown Manhattan as light snow falls, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Northeast residents are girding for a heavy snowstorm that could bury communities from northern New Jersey to southern Maine in up to 2 feet of snow. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Another snow job

Today, politicians and their ideological fellow travelers in the media use the normal cycles of the seasons to promote “climate change.”

Illustration on the failed policy of enemy combatant internment by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The al-Marri enigma

Ali Saleh al-Marri is a convicted conspirator who entered the United States before Sept. 11, 2001, in order to create a dreaded sleeper cell here that might someday launch an attack on Americans similar to what we witnessed earlier this month in Paris. When the feds woke from their slumber on Sept. 11, they wisely began to search immigration records for persons who came here with no discernible purpose from places known to spawn terrorist groups and who had overstayed their visas. Al-Marri was one such person.

Illustration on heroism replaced by narcissism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Heroes in the age of the selfie

Heroes, real ones, are getting harder to find. One of the few remaining annual surprises in the typical State of the Union address is the president’s introduction of his “mystery guest.” President Reagan introduced the first one in 1982, celebrating one Leonard Skutnik for an extraordinary act of courage.

Conservatism has blossomed into the major intellectual and political force of our time. (Rod Lamkey Jr/ The Washington Times)

Conservatism is now everywhere

There is a problem with the Internet. Its commentary is too often dominated by pinheads. H.L. Mencken used to complain that only idiots write letters to the editor. That might have been true of his day — the 1920s and 1930s — but in our time writers of letters to the editor of newspapers and even of websites are occasionally quite well-informed and even lucid. But others, I am afraid, are indeed pinheads, sitting in their underwear back home, foaming at the mouth, believing that the whole world is profoundly interested in their every word, until the authorities arrive at their homes to take them away.

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Stop U.S. self-disarmament

Common estimates of the number of privately owned guns in the United States are between 300 million and 310 million. No one really knows the exact number, and these figures include both legally and illegally owned firearms.

Illustration on the Obama administrations role in Iranian nuclear ambitions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s price for Obama’s coveted legacy

The importance of any political event is best measured against its opponents' reactions. By that yardstick, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's agreement to speak about the dangers of Iran's pursuit of nuclear weapons before a joint session of Congress is already enormously significant.

Illustration on American's diminished economic freedom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Regaining lost economic freedom

If you were to rank all the countries of the world based on their level of economic freedom, you'd think the United States would be a shoo-in for first place, right? Surely we would be at least somewhere in the top five.

The truth about communists in Hollywood

At last. After more than a half-century there is now available a book that thoroughly discredits all the movie industry protestations that there were no Communists in filmmaking during and after World War II, when in fact there were hundreds.

Illustration on corrupt reprisals from the IRS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Payback from the IRS

The Internal Revenue Service's woes did not begin or end with Lois Lerner and the agency's targeting of political opponents with punitive action. Earlier this month we became painfully aware (again) that political games and punishing the taxpayer appear to be the burgeoning raison d'etre of the tax-collecting agency.

Fool’s errand to expect Cuba change

George Santayana got it right when he said, "Those who cannot remember the past are condemned to repeat it." President Obama's latest move to normalize diplomatic and trade relations with the brutal Cuban regime with little or no guarantee of anything much in return will only empower and enrich the communist leaders even more.

A New York snow scene following a major blizzard..  (AP Photo/The Syracuse Newspapers, David Lassman)

The Manhattan snow storm: A rush of 'blizzard buddies' - and the Great Kale Panic of '15

- The Washington Times

Only in New York, perhaps? As snow falls and gale force winds howl down city streets, some residents of the Big Apple now seek "blizzard buddies." That's right. They don't want to face Winter Storm Juno alone. Scores of romance-minded New Yorkers have taken to Craigslist with unapologetic invitations for companionship, amour and cocoa - among many other things.

The Democratic assault on free speech

- The Washington Times

Everybody's for free speech — until somebody says something he doesn't like. But the genius of the First Amendment is that it is so direct and plain that even a lawyer or a judge can understand it.

Ali Khamenei, the mullah who is the supreme leader of Iran, tells his Twitter followers that "This barbaric, wolflike & infanticidal regime of #Israel which spares no crime has no cure but to be annihilated." (AP Photo/Office of the Iranian Supreme Leader, File)

Playing the fool’s game

The clock is ticking on efforts to halt Iran's quest for the bomb, and time is running out. When it does, the folly of allowing a rogue state to threaten the Middle East — and the world — with the bomb will be exposed in stark and horrifying relief. Neville Chamberlain was the face of appeasement in the 20th century; Barack Obama would be that face in the 21st.

A woman waves a Greek flag during a speech by the leader of Syriza left-wing party Alexis Tsipras outside Athens University Headquarters, Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015. A triumphant Alexis Tsipras told Greeks that his radical left Syriza party's win in Sunday's early general election meant an end to austerity and humiliation and that the country's regular and often fraught debt inspections were a thing of the past. "Today the Greek people have made history. Hope has made history," Tsipras said in his victory speech at a conference hall in central Athens. (AP Photo/Fotis Plegas G.)

Now Greeks should dump the Euro

Since 2008, the Greek economy has shrunk by 25 percent, and the stock market is down more than 80 percent.

The lessons he learned in public service

Considering his life as a U.S. foreign service officer (FSO), Christopher Hill has few regrets. An FSO brat, his passion for diplomacy was fostered early. Referencing a formative experience in Cameroon, Mr. Hill explains, "I signed up for the Foreign Service exam ... and resolved to pass it, because I knew that was what I wanted to do with my life."

Two years after Obamacare opened for business, Mr. Obama's health care scheme isn't exactly solving the problem every American must deal with. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel)

Doubling down on disaster

President Obama is for choice and competition in the health-insurance market, as befits a champion of the free market, except when he isn't. "My guiding principle is, and always has been," he said in 2009 when he was trying to sell Obamacare, "that consumers do better when there is choice and competition. That's how the market works. In Alabama, almost 90 percent of the market is controlled by just one company. And without competition, the price of insurance goes up and quality goes down."

Illustration on the illusory nature of the economic recovery for the middle class by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama's illusory economic recovery

The big news from this week's State of the Union address is that the economic "crisis is over." Apparently, we've been rescued from a second Great Depression and everything this president has done to fix the economy has worked. All that was missing from Mr. Obama's celebration was the old "Icky Shuffle" end zone dance.

Romney's return

This is to put in my two cents in support of Mitt Romney as the Republican candidate for president. It is an unfortunate truism in this day and age that a winning candidate must be tall and handsome with an attractive wife. Abe Lincoln would never make it now, nor would some of Mitt's potential rivals.

Obama, General of the Free Army Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama's Free Stuff Army

Fresh from offering "free" health care, "free" phones and "free" food to the masses, he's upped the bribery to "free" community college tuition and "free" child care. It's not that the Clintons oppose any of these; they just need to affect moderation in case Hillary runs for president and has to knock back boilermakers again with the good old boys in Pennsylvania taverns.

Gov. Terry McAuliffe, the new Democratic governor, no fan of the civility-in-government movement, calls Mr. Black's measure "counterproductive and mean-spirited" and had threatened to veto it if the legislation passed. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Breaking the law is no solution

No one would reward a shoplifter just because he manages to get out of the store with stolen merchandise, but every Democrat in the Virginia state Senate — and one Republican — voted last week to reward those who broke into the country illegally and get a valuable public benefit.

Illustration on the fall of Yemen by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Yemen's collapse demonstrates Obama's foreign policy failures

Last Tuesday night, President Obama assured the American people that their nation is secure because of his leadership. His "steady, persistent resolve," Mr. Obama proclaimed in his State of the Union speech, has resulted in a "safer, more prosperous world."

Greek Cypriots should return to negotiations

Contrary to the Hellenic Institute's Nick Larigakis' latest round of histrionics ("Turkey's Cyprus incursion nothing new," Letters, Jan. 21), the appearance of a civilian seismic exploration vessel offshore is a modest assertion of the inherent rights of Turkish Cypriots and a peaceful response to the Greek Cypriot side's disruptive, unilateral actions.