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John Kerry. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The latest news from the president in exile

- The Washington Times

The government in exile — the real one, according to the media — has had a busy week at home and abroad. “President Obama” has given up leading from behind and presumes now to lead from overseas. His secretary of state has a new mission, as missionary to the safe places where snowflakes fall.

Illustration on Obama's Labor Board legacy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ending the Obama labor board majority

Elections have consequences, or at least they are supposed to. Unfortunately for the rights of independent workers who don’t want to associate with a labor union, more than 100 days have passed since Barack Obama left office, but the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB) remains in the hands of an Obama majority intent on pushing the limits of Big Labor’s forced unionism powers. It doesn’t need to be that way.

Illustration on Confederate soldiers buried in Arlington Cemetery by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Memorial Day must honor all of America’s fallen

As president of the American Veterans Center, the organization that produces the National Memorial Day Parade in Washington D.C., I am sometimes questioned as to why we include Confederate reenactors in our timeline of American military history.

Illustration on tax reform by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The case for tax and entitlement reform

Lobbyists are out in full force to block genuine tax reform. If Congress bends, great harm will come to ordinary folk — fewer good-paying jobs and a federal government too strapped to care for seniors and the truly needy.

Illustration on Trump's "Russian' problems by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Possible crimes and cover-ups

In his first four months in office, President Trump has achieved the dubious distinction of being investigated by an independent prosecutor and at least five major oversight committees in Congress run by his own party.

FILE - In this Oct. 26, 2016, file photo, one of the remaining cows on Alabama farmer David Bailey's farm, walks towards a pile of hay to be fed, surrounded by dirt where ankle deep green grass use to be, acceding to Bailey, in Dawson, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson, File)

What’s the cattlemen’s beef? Washington

- The Washington Times

David Cook is a cattleman, a rancher and a member of the Arizona State House. He’s no Beltway insider. Mr. Cook came to Washington this week to spell out his beef. In short, he wants Congress to stop trying to lasso other ranchers and rural Americans with regulations.

Illustration on the need for Arab states to deal with Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A harsh message worth sending

Just when everyone here was deep in preoccupation with partisan fantasy over whether Donald Trump should be impeached or removed by the 25th Amendment, the president changed the subject. Presidents can do that.

Illustration on Saudia Arabian duplicity by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia’s duplicity

Trusting Saudi Arabia to combat terrorists and extremists and “drive them out,” as President Trump called on the kingdom and other Arab and Muslim nations to do in his Riyadh speech, is akin to forging an alliance with the Ku Klux Klan to combat racism and anti-Semitism.

Protesters from labor and other progressive groups fill the rotunda of the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, to demand that Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton veto the bills that passed before the Minnesota Legislature's special session bogged down earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Steve Karnowski)

The dirty secret behind big labor’s decline

- The Washington Times

My father was a toolmaker and union organizer who, for many years, headed the Rockford, Ill. Labor Council while my mother was serving five terms as head of the Women’s Auxiliary of the United Auto Workers. Dad worked as a machinist and my mother as a waitress and clerk in a local jewelry store until my dad retired and joined a couple of buddies to buy a bar.

Cutting Taxes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A rare chance to boost small businesses

Among the many lessons our current leadership should learn from Ronald Reagan’s effective governance are his initiatives to revitalize the American economy. Most relevant today is remembering President Reagan’s tax cuts and corporate tax reform of 1986 enacted with bipartisan support that produced sustained economic growth.

FILE - In this Saturday, May 20, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump holds a sword and sways with traditional dancers during a welcome ceremony at Murabba Palace, in Riyadh. Trump and his entourage were treated to a traditional all-male Saudi sword dance. Standing shoulder-to-shoulder with the Saudi king, Trump swayed side to side and briefly joined the groove. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump’s vision for the Middle East

President Trump arrived in the Arabian desert hoping to realign the politics of the Middle East in the aftermath of a failed Obama policy. For eight years, President Obama tilted in the direction of Iran, believing that the influence of the Shia could balance Sunni dominance.

Illustration on biometric screening security measures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Integrating biometrics into visitor screening

The horrible attack in Manchester, coupled with the recent release of the Department of Homeland Security’s Visa Overstay Report, should again force us to ask the question, are we doing everything we can to properly vet those seeking to come to the United States?

Related Articles

State Licensing is a Roadblock to Success Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Thriving without a license

What do auctioneers, butter tasters, florists, hair braiders, makeup artists and taxidermists all have in common? They need permission from the government, in the form of an occupational license, to do their jobs.

Go player Ke Jie, center, speaks at a press conference after playing a match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo, during the Future of Go Summit in Wuzhen in eastern China's Zhejiang Province, Tuesday, May 23, 2017. Ke Jie, the world's top-ranked Go player, started a three-round showdown on Tuesday against AlphaGo, which beat a South Korean Go master in a five-round showdown last year. (AP Photo/Peng Peng)

The great crawl of China

The world has watched with amazement as China sprints toward its goal of becoming an advanced economy. Average annual gross domestic product (GDP) growth of 10 percent over the last 20 years has raised hundreds of millions of its citizens out of poverty and transformed China into an economic powerhouse.

Illustration on the benefits of biofuel by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cultivating homegrown energy solutions

With all the publicity around fracking, it's easy to assume that America's own domestic oil production is more than enough to fuel a growing economy. It certainly helps. But there's no magic bullet that will ensure long-term American energy security.

Illustration of Roger Ailes    The Washington Times

Roger Ailes' exit, stage right

A major threat to the predominance of the Kultursmog in these United States passed away last week, but he had succeeded in what he set out to do, namely: to damage the left in America beyond any hope of recovery. Not many people recognize this, but it is nonetheless true.

Pentagon under no 'green' illusions

Rebecca Hagelin's "Peace through diversity?" op-ed (Web, May 21) article requires a response. I'm just a visitor here in Maryland and happened to read Ms. Hagelin's piece. Though not an expert, I had to wonder about the wisdom of her conclusions. She lumps diversity and global warming together as absurd world views that result in "ridiculous and dangerous military strategy."

Trump is not Nixon

The anti-Trump crowd is claiming that President Trump has, like Richard Nixon, committed an impeachable offense. Thus pressure is being applied to force his resignation.

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump, leave the White House as they embark on Mr. Trump's first overseas tour to the Middle East. (Associated Press)

A budget to encourage growth

Donald Trump is a different kind of president and his spending plan for the nation is a different kind of budget. With U.S. debt at $20 trillion (that's with a T, not a mere B), it's a budget that offers a way off the path to insolvency. With Democrats determined to thwart his presidency, to tear every proposal to shreds, he will get a test of his leadership to win over spendthrift Republicans.

At midlife, an accounting

Even those of us who have not yet had a midlife crisis know what to expect when one arrives because lifestyle magazines heavily promote them. They may show up in office dress insisting on a debit and credit analyses of success and failure. You will probably get pats on the back if you survive this. But they can also erupt as a dark cloud of second (or 92nd) thoughts about a partner contracted for ever and ever in an earlier decade.

President Trump and first lady Melania Trump, leave the White House as they embark on Mr. Trump's first overseas tour to the Middle East. (Associated Press)

How much does CNN hate Trump? 93% of coverage is negative

For the youngsters out there, once upon a time, CNN was pretty much down the middle. The fledgling network covered news -- real news, not fake news -- and worked hard to be on site wherever news was happening. When something happened, that was the place to go.

People applaud following a moment of silence for the victims of the Manchester bomb blast, outside the Palais du Festival in Cannes, southern France, Tuesday, May 23, 2017. An apparent suicide bomber attacked an Ariana Grande concert as it ended Monday night, killing over a dozen people among a panicked crowd of young concertgoers, in Manchester, England. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

Milo erupts on Ariana as 'too stupid,' too 'pro-Islam'

- The Washington Times

Milo Yiannopoulos, conservative writer, went on a rant against Ariana Grande on his Facebook account, calling out the pop star for her naive views of Islam. But the slam is perhaps a bit unfair. After all, Grande isn't the policy-maker for open borders and red-carpet roll-outs to migrants from terror hot spots.

In this photo taken May 19, 2017, a GPO worker stacks copies of "Analytical Perspectives Budget of the U.S. Government Fiscal Year 2018" onto a pallet at the U.S. Government Publishing Office's (GPO) plant in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Trump budget a good step in pro-taxpayer direction

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump is proposing in his "New Foundation for American Greatness" plan some of the largest cuts to government programs the country's seen in a decade, including a provision that will reign in debt and cut spending by $3.6 trillion over the next ten years. Of course, the left is already crying.

Armed police patrol the streets near to Manchester Arena in central Manchester, England, Tuesday May 23, 2017. An apparent suicide bomber attacked an Ariana Grande concert as the performance ended, killing 22 people as the audience filed out of the arena and sending frantic parents searching for their children amid a panicked crowd of young concertgoers. (AP Photo/Rui Vieira)

ISIS, radical Islam rear at Ariana Grande concert

- The Washington Times

Twenty-two people were killed and another 59 injured in what British Prime Minister Theresa May is calling an "appalling terrorist attack" at an Ariana Grande concert in Manchester Arena. And it wasn't long after that ISIS, surprise, surprise, claimed responsibility.

Illustration on the notion of government subsidy of nuclear power by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why nuclear power subsidies must end

Should utility bills and taxes be used to subsidize money-losing nuclear power plants so they can compete with renewable energy and low-cost natural gas?