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United Nations Secretary General Ban Ki-moon is joined by Somali President Hassan Sheikh Mohamoud during a high level meeting on Somalia at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

When world leaders got garbage for lunch

- The Washington Times

They gave the world leaders, in town for the opening session of the United Nations, lunch in New York the other day and all they got was swill. The leaders munching on the people’s dime said a good time was had by all, but that’s only if your taste runs to garbage. The chefs cheerfully conceded that that garbage was what it was.

Illustration on the changing and perilous situation of presidential candidates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How the election revolution has arrived

Apolitical revolution is taking place in America. The process of selecting party presidential candidates has been transformed in the last two or three election cycles. Now we have the early debates designed to drive poll numbers and tell us who’s “ahead” and who’s “behind,” who’s “gaining” and who’s “dropping.”

Illustration on merging health insurance providers by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Proving their medicine is a good as their perks

The planned mergers of four of America’s largest health insurers — Anthem with Cigna, and Aetna with Humana — has triggered a vigorous debate in academic and policy circles.

Illustration on National Manufacturing Day by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Celebrating manufacturing

This morning when you looked at your calendar, you probably didn’t realize that today (Friday) is Manufacturing Day. Even though it’s not a national holiday (no, you don’t get to stay home from work), this day is still noteworthy.

Illustration on the increasingly dangerous international situation developing in Syria by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

Pursuing contradictory goals

The Russian intervention in Syria is straight out of a Cold War nightmare, conceivably even a countdown to Armageddon updated for the 21st century. Such “Mideast contingencies” were constant focal points of war-games that often recurred during my 30-year military career.

House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Calif., pauses as he speaks about foreign policy during the John Hay Initiative, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015, at a hotel in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) ** FILE **

Kevin McCarthy revisits Benghazi

When House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthy blurted out on Fox News September 30 that: “Everybody thought Hillary Rodham Clinton was unbeatable, right? But we [the Republicans] put together a Benghazi special committee, a select committee.

Russian President Vladimir Putin speaks as he heads a meeting of the Presidential Council for Civil Society and Human Rights at the Alexadrovsky Hall in the Kremlin in Moscow, Russia, Thursday, Oct. 1, 2015. (Yuri Kochetkov/Pool photo via AP)

Now Russia turns to Syria

Russia’s daring entry into the Syrian war is Vladimir Putin’s riskiest move yet to challenge the West, especially President Obama, after he got away with murder in eastern Ukraine.

Illustration on Pope Francis' U.S. visit by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Papal burnout

Unpopular though it may be to say so, I, for one, grew exhausted by the nonstop pronouncements and commentaries of Pope Francis. The spiritual leader of 1 billion Catholics — roughly half of the world’s Christians — Francis just completed a high-profile, endlessly publicized visit to the United States.

Illustration on China's coverup of it's abuses in Tibet by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forgotten Tibet

Chinese leader Xi Jinping’s state dinner at the White House last week received fulsome coverage — about the fashion, the food and tech giants in attendance.

Illustration contrasting Democrat and GOP views of the presidency by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Love and hate for big government

The two parties’ differing views of big government explain their differing challenges in winning the 2016 presidential election.

Illustration on the dangerous void left by America's leadership vacuum in world affairs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A rush to fill the power vacuum

For every nuanced policy argument over isolationism versus interventionism, the unavoidable truth — however unpleasant it may be — is this: If the United States is not the world’s foremost power, someone else will be.

Related Articles

Office workers sit for hours on end, with health consequences in the mix. (AP Photo)

A mere 10-minute walk through the office can reverse the ill effects of a desk job: Study

- The Washington Times

A 10-minute walk through the office cubicles could work a small wonder for the millions of Americans stuck behind desks and subject to the hazards of a sedentary lifestyle. Researchers from the University of Missouri School of Medicine have found that vascular function - blood flow through the body - is impaired after six hours of prolonged sitting. A short walk, they say, can restore vascular health.

Then-Incoming House Minority Leader John Boehner of Ohio, center. (AP Photo/Lawrence Jackson, File)

A speaker for the people

Intramural Republican fights often resemble high school student-body elections, or the way the ladies conduct "roasts" of each other. The point of a roast is to sling witty insults just this side of bad taste. They're usually good fun, even for the roastee. When the ladies do it the "roasts" usually become gentle and lady-like toasts. Some things don't translate.

Egypt's President Abdel Fattah el-Sisi arrives for the 70th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. (AP Photo/Jason DeCrow)

Good news in Egypt

Good news is not an export from the Middle East, but sometimes there's a nugget of something not so bad for the patient. President Abdel-Fattah el-Sisi is resuming Egypt's role as leader of the Arab world. He has had no particular help from President Obama, who prefers to "lead from behind."

Illustration on CFPB's regulatory threats to payday loans by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why payday loans are in consumers' best interests

It is difficult for many of us to imagine having to choose between paying the rent on time or purchasing our sick child's prescription medicine. But for many Americans who live paycheck to paycheck, circumstances like these are an all-too-familiar reality.

Illustration on Syrian refugees' impact on the EU economy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

EU immigration dysfunction

The millions of refugees pouring into Europe should prove a boon to its slow-growing economies. However, with unemployment so high in austerity-burdened Mediterranean states, Germany's eagerness to fill jobs with Syrians and other refugees is an indictment of the European Union's (EU) dysfunctional economy and cultural rigidities.

Republican presidential candidate and retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson speaks during a forum in Manchester, N.H., on Aug. 3, 2015. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The hunting of Ben Carson

- The Washington Times

The civility and good manners crowd is attempting to destroy Ben Carson, but so far it isn't working. He said something about Muslim presidential candidates that was harsh but a mile this side of over-the-top, and instead of a ride out of town on a rusty rail he watched his numbers spike.

Illustration on Justice Sotomayor's unpaid intern servant staff by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sotomayor: 'Do as I say, not as I do'

How would you like a free butler, maid, chef and chauffeur? Try that and the Department of Labor will sue you for violating the minimum wage, overtime and record-keeping requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act -- unless you are Justice Sonia Sotomayor.

Injustice wrong in all forms

Many people who fight for the ethical treatment of animals also work to protect people, including unborn babies. Why do some just assume otherwise? Surely no one would say, for example, that people who go to bars care more about beer than babies, or that movie-goers are wasting money on movies while unborn babies die.

Shariah, Constitution incompatible

When presidential contender Ben Carson stated recently that he would not approve of electing a Muslim as president of the United States, both Republican and Democrat politicians jumped on him. Challenger Ted Cruz reminded him that the U.S. Constitution itself says there shall be no religious test for public office.

John Boehner    Associated Press photo

John Boehner, then and now

The announcement by House Speaker John Boehner that he is retiring at the end of October stunned Washington where life is all about grabbing power and holding on to it, often until death they do part.

Pope Francis talks to journalists during a press conference he held while en route to Italy, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. Pope Francis returned to the Vatican Monday at the end of a 10-day trip to Cuba and the United States. (Tony Gentile/Pool Photo via AP) ** FILE **

Overlooked remarks from the 'people's pope'

To say that Pope Francis' visit to the United States drew a lot of media attention would be an understatement. The coverage was 'round-the-clock. Yet as a lifelong "cradle Catholic," educated by Jesuits, I couldn't help noticing what a remarkably incomplete, if not misleading, portrait emerged of the Holy Father.

Blame game: Russian President Vladimir Putin, while bolstering military aid to Syria, said U.S. moves have deepened the ongoing refugee crisis. (Associated Press)

A small victory for Putin

Vladimir Putin can claim a small victory Monday at the United Nations when he sits down with Barack Obama, even if, as the White House suggests, it was the Russian president who asked for the date.

Fund, update GMD now

These days, you can't open the newspaper without seeing stories about the Iranian nuclear program ("Iranians provided own samples for nuclear site inspection," Web, Sept. 21). But as we focus on Iran, let's remember that the greater threat to the U.S. homeland comes from North Korea.

Reinstate ethical Green Beret

In World War II, America sent its finest men and women to oppose Hitler's tyranny. Had we not responded to Winston Churchill's pleas for the United States' involvement, it is conceivable that Europe, and certainly many more of the Jewish people, would have perished under the Nazis.