Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Shiite rebels, known as Houthis, wearing an army uniform, ride on an armed truck to patrol the international airport in Sanaa, Yemen, Saturday, March 28, 2015. Yemen's President Abed Raboo Mansour Hadi, speaking at an Arab summit in Egypt on Saturday, called Shiite rebels who forced him to flee the country "puppets of Iran," directly blaming the Islamic Republic for the chaos there and demanding airstrikes against rebel positions continue until they surrender. (AP Photo/Hani Mohammed)

Why Yemen matters

Thoughts on the shifting dynamics in the Middle East.

President Barack Obama speaks about payday lending and the economy, Thursday, March 26, 2015, at Lawson State Community College in Birmingham, Ala.  (AP Photo/Butch Dill)

Barack Obama’s love bomb offensive

- The Washington Times

President Obama says Rudy Giuliani was wrong. He does, too, love America. That’s good enough for me. He says he’s a Christian, despite his constant love bombs for Islam, and if that’s good enough for God it’s good enough for me, too. Conversations between believers and the Almighty are confidential, and have yet to be cracked by the National Security Agency (but we can be sure they’re working on it).

Obamacare in a death spiral illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obamacare flying machine begins a death spiral

The Supreme Court decision in King v. Burwell, the case challenging the Obama administration’s decision to award tax credits for health insurance sold through federally established exchanges, could turn on the question of whether a ruling that ends the tax credits on federal exchanges might cause something known as a “death spiral” in health insurance markets.

Warren’s pitchfork brigade skewers the facts

Ted Cruz’s announcement this week that he’s running for president has officially kicked off the 2016 primary season and has put the pressure on other potential GOP candidates to declare. On the Democratic side of the scrum there is Elizabeth Warren, whom progressives hope is the candidate-in-waiting to lead their pitchfork brigade against the “1 percent.” While it’s still unclear whether Mrs. Warren will announce, it’s assured that her income inequality position will drive a major plank in the eventual Democratic nominee’s platform.

Illustration on the lack of U.S abortion data by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The unhealthy state of abortion statistics

Abortion advocates in Congress and in state legislatures claim that abortions are “safe.” Yet numerous, long-standing problems at the state and federal level illustrate that the abortion data collection and reporting system in the United States is haphazard and dysfunctional, making assertions about “abortion safety” unreliable.

Illustration on the Cotton letter's impact on nuclear talks with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tom Cotton, tragic hero

The snarky quip attributed to 19th-century French Foreign Minister Charles Maurice de Talleyrand — “It was worse than a crime; it was a blunder” — has recently been making the rounds to deride a letter written by Republican Sen. Tom Cotton of Arkansas and signed by 46 other senators.

Illustration on entering the presidential race by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The learning curve of a candidate

As we stand about 20 months out from Election Day 2016, I have much to learn in terms of becoming both a better candidate and a better potential president of the United States. I do not take the opportunity lightly.

Illustration on the value of the U.S. satellite system by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Launching the crown jewels

If America didn’t have hundreds of satellites in orbit, our Air Force, Navy and Army — as well as our intelligence agencies — wouldn’t be deaf, dumb and blind. But they’d come close. Our aircraft, ships and submarines are designed to depend on satellites for their high-technology capabilities.

Cherry-picking statistics illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Missing the mark on climate change skepticism

During the past few weeks, a series of articles in the press have implied that Willie Soon, a well-known global-warming skeptic, had violated ethical standards by failing to disclose information about research funding.

Rainbow flag. (Wikipedia)

Panic inside the lavender bubble

- The Washington Times

Life can be good inside a bubble, where the sun always shines, life is a bowl of cherries and it comes with whipped cream and no calories. You could ask almost anyone in San Francisco, where the only disappointment inside the lavender bubble is among the gay caballeros who don’t get to carry the six-foot papier-mache penis to lead the annual Gay Pride Parade.

Related Articles

Cancer screenings save lives

With March being Colon Cancer Awareness Month, it's time that the public and media paid more attention to this silent and deadly disease. Despite being the third most commonly diagnosed cancer and the third leading cause of cancer death in both men and women in the United States, the stigma of colon cancer screenings still exists in the United States and abroad.

Illustration on the Iranian nuclear threat to Israel by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

How a bad Iran deal could destroy Israel

In 1982, during one of many visits to Israel, I had the opportunity to speak with Prime Minister Menachem Begin, who told me, "Israel needs friends." He added that in the end, his nation could not trust any nation with its fate and security. The protection of Israel, he said, was ultimately the responsibility of Israelis.

Chart to accompany Rahn article

Surprising Peru

When someone mentions Peru to you, what is the first visual image that pops into your head? Inca Indians with their llamas in the Andes Mountains, looking at the some of the stone ruins of their ancient civilization? Yes, Peru still does have some of that, but most Peruvians are now employed in an increasingly rapid-growing and diverse economy.

Obama the duplicitous one

"Words matter," was White House press secretary Josh Earnest's recent explanation of the Obama administration's intent to reassess its support for Israel regardless of Israeli Prime Minister Netanyahu's clarification of his campaign comments "Benjamin Netanyahu win forces Obama to re-evaluate Middle East peace strategy," Web, March 18). But as words and actions go, President Obama has been the duplicitous one.

How Ronald Reagan countered a nuclear threat

Life and professional partners, the Andersons completed this, their last book together, not long before Martin passed away. It is a model of careful research and clear writing and a tribute to a man, Ronald Reagan, whose vision of a world without nuclear weapons and his determination to bring it about led to the end of the Cold War.

U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement Director Sarah Saldana holds up a counterfeit flask during a counterfeit ticket and merchandise news conference for NFL Super Bowl XLIX football game in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Morry Gash, File)

Immigration out of control

Statistics can be a cure for insomnia, but sometimes they can deliver the jolt of a thunderclap. Here's a thunderclap with a number on it: 165,527. That's the number of illegals in the United States who have been convicted of a crime and were turned loose by the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, an agency of the Department of Homeland Security.

President Barack Obama, center, watches the player's introductions of the Princeton vs Green Bay women's college basketball game in the first round of the NCAA tournament in College Park, Md., Saturday, March 21, 2015. Obama's niece Leslie Robinson, plays for Princeton. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

American stalker

In 1983, the No. 1 song of the year was "Every Breath You Take" by the rock band The Police, written by their lead singer Sting. At the time, many people thought the song was about a stalker, and we were right. Sting has since noted, "I didn't realize at the time how sinister it is. I think I was thinking of Big Brother, surveillance and control."

FILE - In this Feb. 25, 2015 file photo, the Homeland Security Department headquarters in northwest Washington, Tuesday, Feb. 24, 2015. on Wednesday, President Barack Obama signed a law funding the Homeland Security Department through the end of the budget year. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

A bureaucracy at bay

No department of the government has a mission more important than the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), created after Sept. 11, 2001 to defend and protect the towns and cities, the farms and factories of the American homeland. It ought to be one of the most attractive places in Washington to work, inspired by pride and sacrifice to deliver a job well done. But it isn't. It's one of the worst.

Becky Domokos-Bays, the Director of Food and Nutrition Services at Alexandria City Public Schools, holds up a tray of food during lunch service at the Patrick Henry Elementary School in Alexandria, Va., Tuesday, April 29, 2014. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Indigestion in the lunchroom

Hardly anyone has a fond memory of the school cafeteria. The gray meat, if meat is what it was, and peas, Jell-O and oily pizza are best forgotten. Many have tried to improve school lunches but sometimes a tater tot is best left a tater tot. Enter Michelle Obama, the first lady of the steam table. Her good intentions have only done for the school lunch what Obamacare has done for health care, with loud fanfare, more government guidelines and greater costs. With government "help," the lunchroom offers only more kale.

Illustration on Obamacare's fifth anniversary by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obamacare's five years of failure

On March 23, 2010, exactly five years ago today, President Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act into law. Virtually no one had actually read the law, and still fewer understood the full implications of a government takeover of health insurance markets. Now, five years later, we are experiencing these effects firsthand.

Hillary good news/bad news illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats need Hillary, but do they want her?

Democrats need Hillary Clinton in 2016, but increasingly are asking if they want her. Democrats need someone who can take the focus off President Obama and smooth over their growing intraparty split and Hillary is their one candidate who potentially could do both. However, Mrs. Clinton's penchant for unforced errors leaves Democrats wondering if the reward she could bring, is worth the risk she will bring.

Mandatory voting illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Vote — or else

It's not enough to propose liberal ideas. Eventually, you must use force against your fellow citizens if they don't embrace them. Coercion is at the heart of the liberal enterprise.