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Illustration on Obama's undermining of the U.S. military by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Undermining the military

When President Obama announced that he was going to “fundamentally transform” America, not many Americans understood the full depth of that statement. Based on an assessment of his policies over the last six and half years, clearly one of Mr. Obama’s objectives has been to diminish America’s standing and leadership role throughout the world. One result has been that our allies now don’t trust us and our enemies don’t fear us — the worst possible combination.

President Johnson signs Medicare legislation July 30, 1965.                Associated Press photo

Medicare at age 50

Diehard defenders of President Obama’s continuing, wretched rollout of the Affordable Care Act may be quick to point out that other government programs, most notably Medicare, also had rocky starts. But the historical record doesn’t support such nonsense.

Illustration on courtesy, respect and rules in the U.S. Senate by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When tough talk roils the decorum of the Senate

The United States Senate has a long and justly celebrated tradition of comity and respect among members. Although there have been occasional exceptions throughout history, on the whole, senators have taken great care to treat each other with courtesy and respect, both in private discussions and in public deliberations.

Peace Through Strength Bunker Bomb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Reviving ‘peace through strength’

Ever since the Ayatollah Khomeini and his Islamist storm troops took over Iran in 1979, the driving force of the country’s rulers has been (1) destroy Israel; (2) establish Iran as the hegemonist of the Middle East; and (3) drive out all Western influences from the region. Their efforts to create a nuclear arsenal has been part of their strategy to accomplish these goals.

Illustration on the controversy stirred during the creation of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Surviving ‘a perfect storm’ of opposition

Just two months ago, the nation marked the 40th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, and many of the stories in the media were illustrated with images of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the Mall, which over the past three decades has become an American cultural icon — symbolizing that difficult period in our history. Yet, that memorial, as we know it today, almost didn’t happen.

Pinocchio (Associated Press)

When the Big Lie becomes the legacy

- The Washington Times

Maybe the Christian thing to do is to cut John Kerry a little slack. He hit his head harder than the doctor thought when he fell off his bicycle in Switzerland.

Presidential candidate Donald Trump    Illustration by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Let Trump be Trump

Politics — and politicians in a democracy — are a true reflection of society’s virtues and faults at a given window in time.

Illustration on the dominance of the U.N in the Obama/Iran nuclear arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fantasists, bumblers and Iran

First the Obama administration denied that any secret side deals were made when they negotiated the agreement that they insist us will prevent Iran from producing and deploying nuclear weapons. Secretary of State Kerry assured us that it was a “fantasy” to believe there could have been a better deal, and the president said the only alternative is war.

Alternative delegate from Jean, La., Billy Durnley wears a large elephant buckle at the Republican National Convention, Tampa, Fla., Tuesday, August 28, 2012. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

Creating a case for conservatism

Being conservative in a politically correct culture has never been easy. Whether you’re a politician trying to explain a controversial sound-bite, or a voter attempting to defend your stance on a hot-button issue to co-workers, you either grow a thick skin — or learn to keep quiet.

Illustration on ending taxpayer funding of Planned Parenthood by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The moral terrorism of Planned Parenthood

Like many of you, when I first heard the undercover video of a Planned Parenthood official discussing in a detached and macabre manner the selling of aborted baby parts, I was physically sickened.

Illustration on the Obama Iran nuclear arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Peace for our time’

Banner headlines in a prominent national newspaper read “NUKE DEAL PAVES WAY FOR NEW ERA: Sworn Foes U.S., Iran Aim To Bury Hatchet” — without sarcasm. For critics of the Iran nuclear deal, such undeserved praise is ominously reminiscent of the adulatory press that greeted British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain and his ill-fated Munich agreement, upon returning from meeting Adolph Hitler in Nazi Germany on the eve of World War II, declaring, “Peace for our time.”

Related Articles

Robot rights rule!

The season of the Theater of the Absurd continues. After the Supreme Court twisted the clear meaning of plain English words to save Obamacare and bless same-sex marriage, after Iran hoodwinked Barack Obama into preserving and expanding its nuclear program, after Bruce Jenner remade himself (herself? itself?) into a buxom synthetic female, no one should be surprised when R2D2 wakes up to demand his civil rights, too. This might not be what Mr. Obama had in mind, but a conscientious radical accepts everything new, bad or not.

Time for John McCain to go

Though not even close to having decided upon my choice of presidential candidate 2016, I support Donald Trump's interpretation of Sen. John McCain, Arizona Republican ("Trump fires back after 'crazies' remark: McCain a hero 'because he was captured,'" Web, July 18). I am not a McCain fan. Mr. Trump speaks his mind and more of what he has been saying should be said across this nation of ours.

Scaffolding continues to go up on the dome of the U.S. Capitol Building, Washington, D.C., Thursday, September 18, 2014. (Andrew Harnik/The Washington Times)

End run by the credit unions

George Stigler won the 1982 Nobel Prize in Economics for work that changed forever the way economists look at government regulation of business and industry. Before Mr. Stigler, a colleague of Milton Friedman in the Chicago school of economics, the economists and politicians accepted the argument that government regulatory agencies, established to protect the public from abuse, accomplished exactly that. After Mr. Stigler's groundbreaking work, that sentiment was shared not so much.

Illustration on animal rights groups assault on Christianity by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Gospel according to PETA

The decline of Judeo-Christian values in the United States is a topic of concern that's been analyzed greatly over the past decades. Less discussed is this: What if the left co-opts these values?

Joining military could save lives

The incarceration of thousands of black men in America should not be upstaged by the rash of killings of unarmed black people at the hands of law-enforcement officers across the country. Are there any real solutions to stopping the bloodshed and helping black families deal with the issues that stem from growing up in fatherless households? In short, yes.

Illustration on family factors affecting U.S. employment by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why aren't more Americans working?

Has America entered a "new normal" defined by lower economic growth and declining workforce participation? Some evidence may suggest that is the case, but a closer look reveals it is too soon to make that claim.

FILE - In this June 16, 2015, file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, , R-Ky., speaks to members of the media following the weekly Republican luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington. McConnell said July 20 he hopes to announce soon that he and Sen. Barbara Boxer of California have reached an agreement on a transportation bill. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Working on the railroad

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, whose rage at Democrats for the way they ran the Senate when they were the majority, is using some of their tactics to push a six-year highway bill through the Senate. Revisiting the highway funding debate must make senators believe they're caught in a remake of "Groundhog Day" because they've had to pass some 60 short-term extensions in recent years. Mr. McConnell wants to end that, pass a multiyear bill and move on.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Novel Habits of Happiness'

Isabel Dalhousie philosophizes the way some people drink. There is nothing that she won't contemplate, analyze or nitpick, from meerkats in the zoo to the difference between a good submarine (the crew doesn't swear or drink) and a bad submarine which of course must be nuclear.

Secretary of State John Kerry. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Facing the devil in the details

The details of President Obama's deal with Iran continue to leak, like muddy water from a bucket left to rust in the weeds. Several congressmen who lately called on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna learned that there are secret "protocols" to the agreement Mr. Obama made with the mullahs of Tehran. Mr. Obama and the talking heads on television argue lamely that this is "always the way with such undertakings."

Illustration on the FDA labeling of Kratom as "dangerous" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An excuse for crushing kratom

Last year, Americans spent an estimated $374 billion on prescription drugs, up 13 percent from the year before. These drugs include OxyContin, Vicodin, Percocet and others that the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for sale without regard to their potential for abuse.