Skip to content


Featured Articles

George H. W. Bush   Associated Press photo

Weak, confused and ‘unable to grasp’

- The Washington Times

Many bad things happen when a leader is weak, confused and forever in search of a credible reason to do nothing. For all his softness on Islam, Barack Obama has little insight into the men who send out mobs to cry “death to America.” He can’t imagine that men can listen to the call to evening Muslim prayer, which so captivated him as a boy growing up in Indonesia — “the prettiest sound on Earth” — and be inspired to dream of bringing down death on America.

Illustration on NOAA's climate change fictions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

NOAA’s climate change science fiction

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is the nation’s leading collector of climate data. Every day, NOAA analyzes vast amounts of data to predict changes to our climate, weather, oceans and coasts. The agency also publishes monthly temperature averages across the nation and compares those numbers to historical temperature records.

The Invincible Obama Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Behind Obama’s lack of leadership

President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki killed more than 200,000 civilians but stopped a war that had already killed tens of millions and could have wiped out millions more.

Illustration on Obama's undermining Arctic oil exploration and production by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tapping into energy obstructionism

When the Obama administration moved to embrace offshore energy exploration in Alaska earlier this year, skeptics raised a leery eyebrow. Could an administration so hostile to fossil fuels actually change its stripes?

U.S.-Iran Policy Paradox Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Mideast paradox

Most students of Physics 101 have been exposed to a well-known thought experiment called “Schrodinger’s Cat.” In this experiment, renowned Danish physicist Erwin Schrodinger illustrates an absurd feature of quantum theory that allows a hypothetical cat to be both be alive and dead at the same time. This, however, is impossible, a paradox.

Illustration on giving thanks for the American military by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Grateful for American muscle

We Americans have much to be grateful for. Every year we gather together with friends and family to celebrate the Thanksgiving holiday. When we do, we should be grateful as well for the service of the American military in far-flung outposts.

Internal Revenue Service Commissioner John Koskinen answers to the House Oversight Committee in the panel's continuing probe of whether tea party groups were improperly targeted for increased scrutiny by the government's tax agency, at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, March 26, 2014. Earlier this month, IRS official Lois Lerner was called to testify about the controversy but refused to answer questions by committee Chairman Darrell Issa, R-Calif., and invoked her Fifth Amendment rights at least nine times. Associated Press Photo

Impeach IRS chief John Koskinen

After revelations that the Internal Revenue Service was restricting political speech and targeting conservative and tea party groups, John Koskinen was appointed to head the agency, promising reform and transparency.

The monument to General Gouverneur K. Warren at Gettysburg     The Washington Times

A Thanksgiving message in bronze

In the fall of 1865, America marked its first Thanksgiving since the end of the Civil War. Seven months earlier, after Robert E. Lee had surrendered on April 9, the North held a spontaneous jubilee. Cannons boomed, fireworks illuminated the night sky, bands played, people sang in the streets and crowds cheered the savior of the Union, Abraham Lincoln.

Religious Roots of Thanksgiving Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Proclaiming a day of Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is the time when America’s religious roots and traditions are publicly displayed. While we think of feasting at tables filled with food and drink, and imagine the Pilgrims in Plymouth Colony inviting neighboring Indians to join them to celebrate a plentiful harvest, Thanksgiving Day has a much more religious meaning. It was not uncommon in the 17th and 18th centuries for individual colonies to set aside days for prayers of gratitude to our Lord.

An American flag sits in front of gravestones on Veterans Day at San Francisco National Cemetery in the Presidio of San Francisco, Wednesday, Nov. 11, 2015. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)

A refugee’s tale of Thanksgiving

As I grew up in America, I came to realize that the most effective antidote for fear is not courage, but gratitude.

Illustration on the processing of national security intelligence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Memo to presidential campaign advisers

This memorandum is addressed to the brave souls advising presidential candidates. As you know, the recent terrorist attacks in France — and in Mali, Nigeria, Cameroon, Egypt, Lebanon, Turkey and Israel — have altered the political landscape. With less than a year to go before the 2016 election, the landscape may stay altered even if there are no more attacks — and that seems unlikely.

Related Articles

Illustration on the need for streamlines conceal carry permits in Washington, DC by Alexander Hunter/the Washington Times

Fighting ISIS with concealed carry

Following the recent Paris attacks, the Islamic State recently announced its intention to "strike America at its center," in Washington, D.C. Our response should be swift and decisive.

The Battle for Israeli Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The return of a 47-year-old headline

I was thumbing through an old magazine over the weekend. It was 47 years old to be exact, and I came across a surprisingly prescient piece entitled wittily, "The Arab, the Jew, and the Pickle." What particularly caught my eye was that the piece was written by me in what is now called The American Spectator. Imagine that.

France and Russia join forces to fight terror

It's been a couple of weeks that shook the world -- a world that watched in horror a series of tragic acts in Russia, Lebanon, France, Nigeria, Mali, and other places perpetrated by terrorist organizations.

Thanksgiving dinner. (Associated Press)

Restoring a sense of gratitude

Many Americans still believe in this nation's enduring principlesIt's easy, alas, for our gratitude to become perfunctory -- more something we say than something we feel. But take it from someone who has traveled to many countries: A look at what some people around the globe endure can make your appreciation genuine.

Illustration on advances in the world's situation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A bounty of good news

Your Thanksgiving dinner is going to be less expensive. This year the average person will need to work 2 hours, 21 minutes and 57 seconds to pay for all the items in a standard Thanksgiving dinner for 10 people -- a work reduction of one minute and 8 seconds from last year.

Former President George W. Bush speaks at the George W. Bush Institute at Southern Methodist University in Dallas on Feb. 19, 2014. (Associated Press) **FILE**

How Obama cooks the terrorism numbers

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama has given an eloquent testimony to a Christian faith, but his sympathies are always with Islam. He insisted from Asia that "99.9 percent of Muslims worldwide reject terrorism," and that's good news, if true. But it clearly is not.

Black-eye Friday Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Wal-Mart's protests won't sell

For most Americans, Black Friday is the time to shop around for great deals on new Christmas gifts. For Big Labor, it's an opportunity to steal the headlines and advance its agenda.

U.S. President Barack Obama attends the 10th East Asia Summit at the 27th ASEAN Summit in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Sunday, Nov. 22, 2015. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)

President Obama's overseas offensive

When a president goes abroad to defend his strategy for defeating an enemy — and the right word here is "enemy," not "rival" or "adversary" — it's a concession that whether he says it explicitly or not, his strategy has failed. Even members of his own party have at last put partisan loyalty aside and openly challenged the president's failed "leadership from behind."

In this Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015 photo, opposition presidential candidate Mauricio Macri waves to supporters during the closing campaign rally in Humahuaca, Jujuy, Argentina. Macri will face the ruling party candidate Daniel Scioli in a Nov. 22 runoff. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Hope for change in Argentina

There's something hopeful to sing about in the Argentine. The election of Mauricio Macri, 56, the center-right mayor of Buenos Aires, as the new president is an attempt — the latest — to write permanent finis to the Peronista epoch in the nation's history.

Syrian 'Tourist' Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Terrorists as 'tourists'

President Obama has put a new twist on the Islamic invasion now taking place across Europe and the United States. Speaking to reporters last week during his visit to the Philippines, the president compared Syrian refugees to "tourists," saying they are no bigger a threat than people who come to sightsee and visit attractions.

An Israeli policeman collects evidence next to a body of a Palestinian attacker at a West Bank petrol station near Jerusalem, Monday, Nov. 23, 2015. A Palestinian stabbed an Israeli man to death before he was shot dead by security forces. (AP Photo/Mahmoud Illean)

Where terror lurks every day

Think back to October 2002, when the Beltway sniper and his young accomplice paralyzed the Washington region for three weeks, sowing fear and keeping people from pumping gas, buying groceries, holding soccer practices or venturing from their homes. Ponder what just happened in Paris.

Persecution of Christians by Muslims Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No Christians and persecuted minorities allowed

Standing before the cameras in Turkey, President Obama found his safe place to indict half his countrymen for raising the issue of religion in their concern over his plan to open America's gates to tens of thousands of Muslim "refugees" from Syria. Subjecting refugees to a religious test runs counter to American values, said Mr. Obama.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Christian Persecutions in the Middle East: A 21st Century Tragedy'

As the latest terrorist atrocity in Paris demonstrates, radical Islam exhibits a veritable blood lust at the retail level. While politics undoubtedly was behind the attack -- French planes had been bombing Islamic State territory for more than a year -- the killers deployed theology to justify slaughtering 130 common people just going about their lives.

Illustration on President Obama, the tortured genius by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

President Obama, a 'tortured genius'

A U.S. Navy SEAL teammate and friend once described the worst type of leader as a "tortured genius." By this, he did not mean the artist or musician suffering from inspired hysteria, but someone who, no matter how obvious the failing or how fair and valid the criticism, accepts no blame and denies all responsibility. In the mind of such a leader, the rest of the world simply can't see the "genius" in what they do.

Action needed to fix Obama policies

Major disappointments, frustration and the loss of hope can result in great anger. Much of America, especially the black community, is hurting economically. This follows the very high hopes the black community had in 2009 when President Obama came to power. Today, however, black wealth is actually much less than it was in 2009 and the poverty rate is higher.

Time to 'shout' so leaders hear

Some of us will remember the iconic rant of TV anchorman Howard Beale as portrayed by Peter Finch in the 1976 movie "Network." In the film, lead character Beale is an aging and now unttractive newscaster about to get the 'ax.' Plummeting ratings have demanded his head. On the very night which is to be his last, Beale bares his soul, tormented — but not because this is the end of his career, but because it is the end of the civilized world as he knew it.

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus (Associated Press)

'Great enthusiasm for the GOP': Republican Party has a record-breaking streak of fundraising

- The Washington Times

The Grand Old Party still has many grassroots fans, and the war chest continues to grow. Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus says the organization raised a record-breaking $8.7 million in October, bringing their total in the 2016 election cycle to $89.3 million. Ninety nine percent of the donations are $200 or less; the average donation was $69.

Confused about the enemy

Since the horrific Paris terror attacks, President Obama and the Democrats want you to think that defending ourselves from Islamic terrorism will only make things worse. Bombing the Islamic State, you see, will make it easier for them to recruit.

Illustration on refugees and the visa waiver program by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Entering the country visa-free

In the wake of the Paris terrorist attacks, Americans are more worried than ever about an attack on the United States. Their concerns are aggravated when they hear Washington debating the Visa Waiver Program (VWP), something most people had never heard of before. But it is critical to the security of our nation. The Visa Waiver Program allows visa-free entry to our country.