Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Chicken Little

Nobody does hysteria like the media

- The Washington Times

Chicken Little will have company when the sky falls on the British isles and the world ends, which the European Union, The New York Times, The Washington Post, the BBC, CBS, NBC, ABC and Barack Obama can now say with confidence will be at 2:20 in the morning next Thursday (just in time for the late final editions).

Illustration on U.S. job opportunities and economic stagnation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Brexit’ strikes back at the elites

Last week, Britain voted to leave the European Union, freeing itself from international governance. Just as the United States would recoil at the thought of Canadians making laws that trump U.S. governance were that a provision of the North American Free Trade Agreement, Britain is evidently fed up with ceding its sovereignty to unelected bureaucrats in Brussels as part of its international agreements.

In this photo taken, March 17, 2016, people rally in front of the San Luis Obispo County government building in support of Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in San Luis Obispo, Calif. Pacific Gas & Electric Co. and environmental groups said Tuesday, June 21, 2016, that they've reached an agreement that will close the Diablo Canyon plant, California's last nuclear power plant, by 2025. (David Middlecamp/The Tribune (of San Luis Obispo) via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

How ‘greens’ add to greenhouse gases

Listening to environmentalists talk about the threat of climate change is like hearing some lost passage of the Book of Revelation with predictions of flooded cities, wildfires, hurricanes, failing crops and swarms of disease-bearing mosquitoes.

Illustration on America's military strength versus tyranny by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The enduring strength of America

As we soon pause to celebrate the anniversary of our nation’s independence, it seems appropriate to consider the vital role played by the American military in the creation of our nation and its transformation of our world.

Illustration on the Brexit vote. (Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times)

What the British revolt signals

Oh what a difference a break makes. On Thursday, our English cousins across the pond voted to leave the European Union. For some reason, they had enough of unelected bureaucrats issuing rules and regulations ruining their lives and throwing the future in the dustbin.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's economic plans by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary pleads for four more years

“People are working harder and longer just to keep their heads above water. And to deal with the costs, the everyday costs, the costs of basics like childcare and prescription drugs that are too high. College is getting more expensive every day. And wages are still too low and inequality is too great. Good jobs in this country are still too hard to come by.”

Illustration on Chinese drugs coming through Mexico by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Drugs and thugs

On June 9, The New York Times ran this headline on Page A1: “Drug That Killed Prince Is Making Mexican Cartels Richer, U.S. Says.” The first line of the story reads, “The drug that killed Prince has become a favorite of Mexican cartels because it is extremely potent, popular in the United States — and immensely profitable, American officials say.”

Eco-Terrorism Damage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Greenpeace under fire

Governments and courts around the world are finally cracking down on the eco-terrorist organization Greenpeace. The crackdown, which is long overdue, couldn’t happen to a more misguided bunch of people.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The bad moon rising over Hillary

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton won’t be able to say she didn’t see the bad moon rising. Donald Trump gave her a blistering introduction this week to Presidential Politics 102, which differs in a remarkable way from Politics 101, which she encountered in her first attempt in 2008 and before that as the managing partner in Bubba’s two campaigns.

Illustration on the Obama administration's plans for the fossil fuel industry by Greg groesch/The Washington Times

Why Exxon is not the problem

For more than 200 years, the American birthright has provided protection against the threat that one’s head might hang on London Bridge — or the Key Bridge, if you prefer — for disagreeing with the government.

Illustration on the struggle for Kurdish independence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Kurdish independence matters

If the next U.S. president wants “to put America first” he might look toward the Kurdish north of Iraq. There the long-standing question of Kurdish independence scares Washington into a tired reflex that quashes important U.S. interests beneath an unwavering policy to promote the fiction of a unified Iraq.

Illustration on the Republican alternative to Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ryan’s Obamacare liberation

Paul Ryan’s House Republican Task Force on health policy reform released on Wednesday the Republican majority’s unified plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. Republicans should not be shy about making this reform the centerpiece of this year’s election.

Illustration on the dangers of Obama, the ideologue by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ideologues make for dangerous politicians

Hillary Clinton is a seasoned liberal politician, but one with few core beliefs. Her positions on subjects such as gay marriage, free-trade agreements, the Keystone XL pipeline, the Iraq War, the Assad regime in Syria and the use of the term “radical Islam” all seem to hinge on what she perceives 51 percent of the public to believe on any given day.

Related Articles

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron delivers a speech at a Britain Stronger In Europe event during campaigning for people to vote to remain inside the EU in Birmingham, England,  Wednesday June 22, 2016.  On Thursday Britain votes in a national referendum on whether to stay inside the EU, a momentous decision with far-reaching implications for Britain and Europe. (Geoff Caddick / Pool via AP)

Decision time in Britain

These are not encouraging days for the "elites" and the political "establishments" of the world. Voters are fed up everywhere, and looking not only for ways out of the mess but for ways to punish the authors of the misery. A president's/prime minister's/premier's lot is not a happy one.

Character quality ignored

"Hillary Clinton's honesty problem may end up not being much of a problem at all," writes Ben Wolfgang ("Hillary Clinton still backed by voters, with honesty issues aside," Web, June 19). Indeed, that which was once regarded as imperative among most voters — character — is no longer a matter of paramount concern, even when it comes to the election of the president of the United States.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gestures as she "sighs" talking about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a rally in Raleigh, N.C., Wednesday, June 22, 2016. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Character no longer counts

Ranking right up there with the line, "Other than that, Mrs. Lincoln, how did you like the play?" is this recent headline in The Washington Times: "Honesty issues aside, voters still back Hillary Clinton, poll shows."

Ensemble cast in a scene from the Broadway musical "Hamilton"

Hip-hop civics, as taught by Donald Trump and 'Hamilton'

Race matters, but it's not all that matters. That's the lesson of "Hamilton," the Broadway musical that "everyone" is pulling strings to see. (My 17-year-old grandson and I lucked out.) "Hamilton" teaches a little history, using rap and music as the sugar to make the history go down.

FILE - In this June 7,2016 file photo, Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Democrats get their long-sought votes on gun control a week after the massacre in Orlando, Florida, but the prospects for any election-year changes in the nations laws are dim. Cornyn is pushing a measure that would allow the government to delay a gun sale to a suspected terrorist for 72 hours, but require prosecutors to go to court to show probable cause to block the sale permanently.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Half-cocked about guns

A broken heart can be slow to heal, and the heart of a parent who has lost a child never will. The bereaved families of shooting victims deserve to assuage their grief in any way they can, and to demonstrate that their beloved did not die in vain. But it's important that sorrow not make things worse.

Much change, no hope

In 2008 I contributed $5,002 to 55 different charities. In 2015 I contributed $1,775 to 25 different charities. In seven years even my contributions to my local parish were cut almost in half. That's a 64.5-percent reduction in overall charitable giving.

GOP, not Trump, real problem

It's easy to say that Donald Trump is an obnoxious, egomaniacal buffoon, but the real story might be a little subtler and a little more complex (not that it makes him any more desirable as president).

Syrian President Bashar Assad listens to  Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu during their talks in Damascus, Syria, Saturday, June 18, 2016. Russia's defense minister visited Syria on Saturday to meet the country's leader and inspect the Russian air base there, a high-profile trip intended to underline Moscow's role in the region. (Vadim Savitsky/ Russian Defense Ministry Press Service pool photo via AP)

A misplaced protest in Syria

Fifty-one career diplomats have signed a protest to the Secretary of State and President Obama condemning U.S. policy, or lack of a good one, in Syria. Their point, that the United States should do everything it can to unseat the barbarous regime of Bashar Assad, is well taken — everywhere but at the White House.