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Sebastian Kurz     Associated Press photo

An Austrian thumb in the eye of the elites

- The Washington Times

The elites everywhere are having a hard time. When the peasants no longer salute, tug a forelock and obey with a whimper, even if with a snarl and a whine, you know you’ve lost your mojo.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Oct. 17, 2017.

Schooling the U.S. on economic freedom

Once again, there is more evidence that economic freedom leads to success. Many of the former communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union have made enormous economic progress from the time they became free almost three decades ago.

Illustration on Richard Nixon's role in the Vietnam War by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A faulty retelling of ‘The Vietnam War’

When Richard Nixon was in the White House, I was in Vietnam and he was my commander in chief. When I was on Ronald Reagan’s National Security Council staff, I had the opportunity to brief former President Nixon on numerous occasions and came to admire his analysis of current events, insights on world affairs and compassion for our troops. His preparation for any meeting or discussion was exhaustive. His thirst for information was unquenchable and his tolerance for fools was nonexistent.

Illustration on China's designs on the electric car market by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The race for electric vehicle dominance

General Motors and Ford are scurrying to realign for what many believe are the next big things — driverless and electric vehicles (EVs) — but don’t look to Detroit, Japan or Germany for the mighty impulse that transforms personal transportation. With the world’s largest car market and savvy government policies, the advantage goes to China.

Illustration on NATO' difficult situation with member nation Turkey by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saving NATO from Turkey

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, known as NATO, faces an existential problem.

A Game of Political Football Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Republican team with no offense

Is the Republican Party in trouble? The primary fight defeat in Alabama and the quick retirement signal by Sen. Bob Corker are not the only straws in the wind. Current polling shows Republicans trail Democrats by 8 percentage points in a generic 2018 House race.

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017, in Andrews Air Force Base, Md., en route Greenville, S.C., for a fundraiser for South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Toward a better nuclear deal with Iran

To hear President Trump’s political opponents describe it, the decision to decertify the Iran Deal is a major miscalculation — a needlessly provocative action that could even bring all-out war.

While early voting may seem more convenient, it actually decreases turnout. (Associated Press/File)

Early voting disadvantages seem to outweigh benefits

Early voting — opening a limited number of locations where people can cast their ballots prior to Election Day — is a “reform” that states should reconsider. Its disadvantages seem to outweigh its benefits.

Illustration on pro-active measures for protecting American cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s aggressive cyberwar

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s regime has been highly aggressive in pursuing cyberwar and cyberespionage at least since its 2007 attacks on the Estonian government. The fact that it is routinely attacking U.S. defense and intelligence cyber-networks can be no surprise.

Illustration on the history leading up the North Korean nuclear crisis by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How we got to a nuclear North Korea

President Trump and his Cabinet have said repeatedly that the present state of affairs with North Korea represents 25 years of American foreign policy failure going back over at least three presidents — Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Reviewing this disaster, there are at least three major mileposts.

American Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A better deal with NAFTA 2.0

America’s trade negotiators are now in the process of crafting a 2.0 update of the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Fortunately, it now appears that Donald Trump’s intention on NAFTA is to mend it, not end it. The trade deal has been a stunning economic success for all three nations: Canada, Mexico and the United States. Freer trade has meant steady increases in the volume of trade, greater competitiveness and lower prices.

Pope Francis, left, asperges incense in front of an icon of Mary and baby Jesus as he celebrates a canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

A step toward ending injustice in abortion

Human liberty and dignity notched a big win earlier this month. The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act is a landmark step adding further protections for the unborn by criminalizing abortions performed after 20 weeks into a pregnancy.

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Illustration on trump's destructive attitude toward Republicans by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

President Trump's stalled agenda

This has been a rough week or two for President Trump. Most job approval polls are plunging, his secretary of State called him a "moron," and the Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman says his behavior could put the U.S. "on the path to World War III."

Efrain Diaz Figueroa talks to volunteers from "Caritas" at the remains of the house of his sister destroyed by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Monday, Oct. 9, 2017. Figueroa, who was visiting for a month at her sister Eneida's house when the Hurricane Maria hit the area, also lost her home in the Arroyo community. He waits for a relative to come from Boston and take him to Boston. He says that he is 70 years old and all his life working can't continue in these conditions in Puerto Rico. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

Exploiting aid to Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico is a mess. But it was a mess before Hurricane Maria swept through with new misery three weeks ago. Electricity is still at a premium. By one estimate, electric power has been restored to only 10 percent of the island's customers.

Figuring Out Paddock Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The making of the Las Vegas murderer

It's been a long week since the largest mass shooting on American soil, which shocked a nation battered by natural disasters. As the FBI searches the killer's house a second time, we have a picture of how the attack took place, the meticulous planning and the heroism of first responders and everyday Americans. What remains a mystery is why? What caused a 64-year-old retired accountant of comfortable means to abandon the high life of a professional gambler and slaughter 58 innocent people?

Gubernatorial candidate Ralph Northam is part of the new trend for Virginia Democrats, who have found that their path to victory runs through the growing suburbs of Washington and Richmond, and the Tidewater area. (Associated Press/File)

The Democratic dilemma in Virginia

The race for governor of Virginia looked like a slam dunk for the Democrats only a fortnight or so ago, and now it doesn't. Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, the Democrat, is still the betting favorite (for people who do that sort of thing), but his double-digit lead in the public-opinion polls has been cut in half.

Millions of dollars in 'oppression'

What does "systemic oppression" look like in 2017? Apparently, a lot like $14.2 million, or the approximate worth of 49ers' safety Eric Reid's contract over the past five years. Where do I line up for such hardship?

Let Taiwan into UNFCCC

The 23rd session of the Conference of Parties (COP23) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), which will take place next month in Bonn, Germany, is capturing worldwide attention. COP23 is the latest in the series of Conference of Parties meetings that are signatory to the Kyoto Protocol, an international treaty through which member states commit to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions.

Mysteries among books and their rare abodes

"Bibliomysteries," a bibliomystery collection edited by Otto Penzler is a rare prize, and if you can wrench yourself away from the Caxton library, you can find the strangest story of all in the account of how pronghorn antelope were taken from Wyoming to Berlin

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly began by saying, "Although I read it all the time, pretty consistently, I'm not quitting today." (Associated Press)

The general schools doltish press corps

- The Washington Times

Gen. John Kelly stepped to the podium in the White House briefing room and delivered a bare-bottom, wire-brush, red-rash public spanking of the political press Thursday-- the likes of which we have never seen in the age of modern media. Except, perhaps, every single time President Trump addresses the media or hurls fiery bolts of Twitter lightning in their general direction.

Boy Scouts of America leaders say they will start developing the next generation of female leaders and allow families to participate in outdoor activities together. (Associated Press/File)

Boy Scouts are for boys, not girls

- The Washington Times

The Boy Scouts of America just announced it was going to allow girls to take part in its scouting program -- to earn the group's highest leadership rank, the Eagle Scout. This is a mistake. Boy Scouts should stay all boy; similarly, the Girl Scouts should stay all girl.

In this June 5, 2017, file photo, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks in Baltimore. Clinton says she's "shocked and appalled" by the revelations of sexual abuse and harassment being leveled at Harvey Weinstein. She says in a written statement on Oct. 10, that the behavior being reported by women "cannot be tolerated." (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

Hillary Clinton, 'appalled' by Harvey Weinstein, still hedges on money

- The Washington Times

Well, finally and at last, and about freaking time. Hillary Clinton came out on CNN on Wednesday to say she was "sick" and "shocked" and "appalled" over the whole Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment-slash-rape allegations floating about the media. But her vow to return Weinstein dollars? Well now, we'll see. Her words suggestion something else.

Then-Attorney General Eric Holder speaks at the Justice Department in Washington, in this March 4, 2015, photo. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) ** FILE **

NFL kneelers -- all hail the Eric Holder

- The Washington Times

What an interesting connection between one leading voice in the pro-anthem kneeling movement, NFL Players Association executive director DeMaurice Smith, and former attorney general, Eric Holder. The former actually worked for the latter. Figures.

In this Nov. 14, 2013, file photo, producer Harvey Weinstein attends the New York premiere of "Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom" in New York. Weinstein faces multiple allegations of sexual abuse and harassment from some of the biggest names in Hollywood. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)

Harvey Weinstein's late accusers

Hillary Clinton: Woods walker, Chardonnay drinker, screamer-into-pillows, sore loser. And now? The recycled claim of Feminist Icon Supporter of All Women. The feminist bar is very low these days.

The honor Jerry Lewis deserved

Legendary entertainer and philanthropist Jerry Lewis has died, after receiving awards from Paris, France, and all over the world, but not from the president of the United States. Why did we deny this icon the opportunity to smell the roses of his success while he lived?

Illustration on preventing Iranian nuclearization by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Iran must be denuclearized

America must not permit Iran to produce nuclear weapons. If a rogue state, the world's No. 1 supporter of terrorism, is allowed to go into the production of nuclear weapons, no other state can be denied them. Proliferation -- in self-defense -- will go wild, and the result will be a world of nuclear horror and chaos, from which there is no return. Here's how it will happen -- and how it can be avoided.