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Sheldon Adelson. (Associated Press)

Now it’s time to pay for the fun

- The Washington Times

Money is not the mother’s milk of politics, as the bundler’s cliche goes, but homemade vanilla ice cream, rich and creamy. Donald Trump hasn’t been getting any. Not much and not lately, anyway.

Saudi Handgun Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The myth of Saudi support for terrorism

Last Friday, the infamous “28 pages” from the 2002 Congressional Joint Inquiry into the 9/11 attacks were declassified. For years, this final section of the report was kept from the public, which led some to believe that it contained evidence that the Saudi Arabian government was behind the attacks, either indirectly by financing al Qaeda or directly by providing support to the actual terrorists on the planes.

Illustration of Ted Cruz as Brutus by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ted Cruz writes a political suicide note

- The Washington Times

Cleveland — As Charles Krauthammer put it, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz wrote “the longest suicide note in U.S. History,” and it was a disjointed, contradictory one that revealed a deeply conflicted and narcissistic man. A principled stand for the party and country? Hardly.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a press conference with Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson at the Foreign Office in London, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool)

The nightmarish results of Muslim outreach

When President Obama entered office, he dreamed that his hope-and-change messaging and his references to his familial Islamic roots would win over the Muslim world. The soon-to-be Nobel Peace Prize laureate would make the United States liked in the Middle East. Then terrorism would decrease.

Iran Missile Factory Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Iran delusions

July 14 was the first anniversary of President Obama’s nuclear agreement with Iran. Because the agreement renders our intelligence community deaf and blind to Iran’s nuclear weapons program, the new report from a German intelligence agency that Iran is violating the deal comes as no surprise.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton addresses the The National Education Association (NEA) Representative Assembly in Washington, Tuesday, July 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

Apple polishing on the stump

Hillary Clinton took pandering to a new level when she addressed delegates to the National Education Association’s (NEA) convention on July 5.

Illustration on the loss of fighting spirit in the U.S. armed forces by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Don’t give up the ship’

The recent release of the investigative report on the “surrender” of two U.S. Navy heavily armed, 48-foot Riverine Coastal Patrol Boats in the North Arabian Sea on Jan. 12 to slightly smaller, armed Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps Navy center-console fishing-type boats was more than an embarrassment for the Navy.

Illustration on Trump's acceptance speech by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The speech Donald Trump should give tonight to win it all

- The Washington Times

Tonight in Cleveland, Donald Trump will accept the Republican nomination for president of the United States. His ascent is the most astonishing political story of our lifetimes, and he achieved it with breathtaking fearlessness, cleverness, wit and smarts. Most importantly, he had from the start an extraordinary sixth sense of the anger, betrayal and anxiety roiling voters and driving their desire to smash the existing order.

Erdogan and the Brotherhood Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The jihadis in France, the Islamists in Turkey

Streets ran red with blood in both France and Turkey last week. A terrorist atrocity and an attempted coup are quite different events. But underlying both is this question: How are the most dynamic forces within the Islamic world shaping the 21st century?

Anti-EU Movement Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Europe’s challenge after Brexit

New surveys released this week by Britain’s EEF manufacturers’ organization and by PricewaterhouseCoopers predict that the United Kingdom’s June 23 vote to leave the European Union will result in economic slowdown. That may or may not prove true.

Election Day Turnout for Trump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Patrick Henry moment

In his column, “The election to terrify us all,” Wesley Pruden warns, “This might be remembered as the year when they gave an election and nobody came. The millions stayed home, the champagne went uncorked, and everybody lived in semi-misery ever after.”

Shia, Sunni and Christian Iraqis pray together in Baghdad at the site of the July 6 truck bombing, the worst such attack since 2003. Associated Press photo

Iraqis united by atrocity

The hell of jihadi terrorism is burning in the hearts of Iraqi citizens even weeks after the worst-ever terror bombing in Baghdad on July 3. The death count is now well above 300, including 172 people whose corpses could only be identified by DNA tests.

Illustration on the relationship between honor killings an Islamist terrorism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Honor killings’ and Islamic terrorism

The world is in chaos, as Islamic violence is setting the tone with terrorism. Whether it be Orlando or Nice or the Bavarian train slasher, we’re all told it was a “lone wolf” transformed into a monster by “radicalization,” one of the left’s favorite fabricated explanations.

Related Articles

Illustration on the potential impeachment of a President Hillary Clinton by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary's historic hat trick

The presidential election year of 2016 has been a remarkable one. For the first time in the history of the United States, a woman is the presumptive nominee of a major political party. Add to that the doubly historic incidence of the first spouse of a previous president being nominated for the same office by the same major political party.

Chart to accompany Moore article of July 18, 2016

Girding for the annual funding fight

The worst-kept secret in Washington, D.C. is that Congress will once again fail to do its most basic constitutional job and pass legislation to fund the federal government beyond the end of the current fiscal year on September 30.

FILE - In this Feb. 10, 2016 file photo, Internal Revenue Service (IRS) Commissioner John Koskinen testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. House conservatives on July 13, 2016, have taken the first step to force an impeachment vote on Koskinen. Conservatives accuse Koskinen of gross negligence, arguing he stonewalled their investigation into IRS targeting of conservative groups. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

When bullies get pushback

The most important thing to learn about bullies is that they don't expect resistance, and when it comes, they often back down -- but not if the pushback isn't serious.

Stifling Cost of Government Regulations Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

'Government is the problem, not the solution'

On its face, government regulation is good. It delivers clean air and water. It stops black lung and other diseases. It interdicts miscreants who would lure you into bad investments and disciplines those who falsely promise million-dollar investment returns. Government is your protector, your friend.

Trump a changed man

Many Republicans and conservatives have one big thing in common these days: They don't trust Donald Trump. In him they see a man who has been a Democrat and has supported liberals, including the Clintons, for years. It certainly is easy to see why people distrust him, particularly when he is so bombastic, insulting and demanding.

View of the famed Promenade des Anglais scene of the Thursday's attack in Nice, southern France, Sunday, July 17, 2016 three days after a truck mowed through revelers. French authorities detained two more people Sunday in the investigation into the Bastille Day truck attack on the Mediterranean city of Nice that killed at least 84 people, as authorities try to determine whether the slain attacker was a committed religious extremist or just a very angry man.(AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Destroying radical Islam

The intelligence and law-enforcement authorities continue to sort out the career of Mohamed Lahouaiej Bouhlel, the author of the latest unspeakable outrage in France, and Omar Mateen, who inflicted the greatest mass killing in American history. Still to be sorted out is the confusion over strategy in Washington. To put it down to "confusion" is the kindest interpretation. Willful blindness and incompetence might be other interpretations.

Sea-claims ruling biased

In order to grant the Philippines a favorable ruling, the Permanent Court of Arbitration classified all islands in the South China Sea as "reefs" ("U.S., allies watch for challenge from China on court ruling over sea claims," Web, July 12). It even classified Taiping Island as a "reef."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Authors in Court: Scenes From the Theater of Copyright'

Mark Rose, research professor of English at the University of California, Santa Barbara, engagingly tells us that he is "a Shakespearean by trade, not a lawyer." He then goes on to confess that "Nonetheless, I have some experience in legal matters, having served as an expert witness in copyright infringement cases for thirty-five years" and that he has lectured and written extensively about copyright and its history.

In this June 16, 2016 photo, CIA Director John Brennan testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, before the Senate Intelligence Committee.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The 28 pages on 9/11

The U.S. House Intelligence Committee finally released 28 pages of the long-suppressed findings of its investigation into the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center in lower Manhattan, and the interesting stuff appears to have been written between the lines. A reasonably talented sixth-grader can connect some of the dots.

Boris Johnson. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A rousing week for the Gaffe Patrol

- The Washington Times

The Gaffe Patrol, that brave and courageous squadron of the media that sets out to seek and destroy politicians and others who inadvertently say something to offend the code of political correctness, has had a remarkably good week here in the Lower 48.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Ghost Sniper: A Sniper Elite Novel'

With the take-down of Osama bin Laden, the most wanted man in the world, and other bold and brave military actions, the U.S. Navy SEALs and other special operations groups are respected and admired greatly. Although the elite special operators perform in a high state of operational security and secrecy, much has been written about them, as the public is very interested in these seemingly larger-than-life military men.

Washington Nationals manager Dusty Baker (12) signs for fans before a baseball game against the Cincinnati Reds, Saturday, July 2, 2016, in Washington. The Reds won 9-4 in ten innings. (AP Photo/Nick Wass) **FILE**

D.C. sports fans don't need to prove anything

The Nationals crowd, as well as the team, is now being graded about how they will perform the rest of the season. Nationals manager Dusty Baker indicated while they watch a first-place team, the home crowd isn't exactly in first place.

Illustration on the myth of free college by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The pipe dream that is 'free college'

Hillary Clinton's plan to make college free for low- and middle-income families does not address the most fundamental challenges in higher education. No matter who pays, universities have become costly and wasteful and do a poor job of equipping young people to earn a living.

Illustration on Soros funded radical organizations by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Beware the Soros zombies

Billionaire George Soros has funded liberal organizations intent on bringing confusion, disarray and trouble to the Republican National Convention in Cleveland next week.