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Illustration on the deteriorating economy by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

A slam dunk for Republicans

A menacing black cloud is looming over our economy that should make the 2016 presidential election a slam dunk for Republicans — depending on who the GOP nominates this summer.

Millennials’ time to choose

The younger generation is tired of the set party rhetoric that permeates every area of society and we are ready for it to change.

Illustration on the need for impartiality in the courts by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Being fair and neutral

Americans rely on fair and impartial courts to safeguard the rights and freedoms they hold dearest. We can be confident in the courts’ authority to safeguard those rights only if we believe that judges are upholding the rule of law, ensuring fairness and fulfilling their obligations with objectivity and neutrality.

Difficult Diplomacy with Bahrain Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Bahrain bullies

Bahrain King Hamad al Khalifa visited President Vladimir Putin in Russia this week in a perfectly-timed reminder of how drastically the Obama administration has failed to handle relations with the small Gulf kingdom over the last five years.

Illustration of various valentines and postcards sent to Congress in support of Woman's suffrage             The Washington Times

Veiled valentines and suffragettes, 1916

The story of the women’s movement for the 19th Amendment or — voting rights amendment — is well known, in terms of the dramatic public demonstrations — from picketing, parades, prison sentences and hunger strikers.

Illustration on the truth about gun control by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Why gun control is a loser for the Democrats

There is nothing so comforting as a closely held prejudice, even when it repeatedly harms you. The white-hot passion of Democratic politicians to restrict and even strip Americans of their constitutionally guaranteed right to buy, own, keep, shoot and carry firearms continues as a monument to self-abuse.

U.N. Policies on Global Warming Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The politics behind the anti-fossil fuels campaign

History shows Earth’s climate goes through cycles, long and short, tied to a variety of natural factors. In the latter part of the 20th century, some scientists began to wonder about the causes of a modest warming, then cooling, then warming, which had been occurring since the mid-1800s. They also began to worry about the possible implications of continued warming.

After a speech at the Illinois State Capitol, President Barack Obama stops at the Hoogland Center for the Arts in Springfield, Ill.(Terrence Antonio James/Chicago Tribune via AP)

Obama is no incompetent

While he was mocked for his performance in the last debate and had a disappointing showing in New Hampshire, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio said what none of his rivals are willing to admit: “Let’s dispel [sic] with the fiction that Barack Obama doesn’t know what he’s doing. He knows exactly what he’s doing. He is trying to change this country” — with astonishing success.

Illustration on unconventional war by Linas Garsys/The Washington Tmes

Winning an unconventional war

War is — and always will be — hell. The Law of Armed Conflict is not meant to change that — only to make it a little less hellish. There are weapons you agree not to use. In exchange, your enemy doesn’t use those weapons against you. You treat captured combatants humanely. You expect the same when your soldiers are taken prisoner.

Draining Military Morale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The military’s malaise

There’s a cloud of malaise worthy of Jimmy Carter that has settled over the nation’s military. The man who should be able to clear away the cloud, Defense Secretary Ashton Carter, won’t be able to do anything about it.

This image provided buy the Library of Congress shows an artists rendering of the surrender of Confederate General Robert E. Lee to Union General Ulysses S. Grant at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865. (Associated Press)

Historical loops of presidents and wars

This Presidents Day, when we commemorate the past and present leaders of this country, it’s also a time for Americans to reconsider the patterns of American power through our history and consider where they want the pattern to continue as we get ready to elect a new leader into office.

Illustration on the mediocre U.S. economic recovery by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

An economy mired in mediocrity

For seven years, President Obama’s economic recovery has been all “faux” and no “go.” The one thing America elected him to do in 2008 — restore the economy — still remains effectively undone as growth continues to be lackluster. It has become clear that when it comes to America’s economy, he takes a uniquely fatalistic approach to its performance.

Related Articles

Protestors against asylum seekers being deported, gather for a rally in Sydney, Australia, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. Australia was resisting mounting international pressure not to deport child asylum seekers, with a minister warning on Thursday that allowing them to stay could attract more refugees to come by boat. (AP Photo/Rob Griffith)

Australia's migrant tide

The immigrant surge throughout the world is not just south to north. Migrants are surging to Australia, too, and Australia's highest court has ordered a temporary respite from a migrant threat like that in Europe and North America.

Comparing Abortion to the Holocaust Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How abortion dehumanizes everyone

Over 50 years ago, Adolf Eichmann, the architect of Nazi Germany's machinery of death, was executed by hanging after his 1961 conviction by an Israeli court.

Logo courtesy of NFL and CBS Sports.

Beer, cheer and a big TV: Americans drop $15.5 billion on their Super Bowl splurge

- The Washington Times

It is a big, bustling, hungry audience: media analysts anticipate that 189 million U.S. fans are expected to watch the fiftieth Super Bowl on Sunday, with another 100 million tuning in worldwide. Big game culture is in force: the National Retail Federation says Americans will spend $15.5 billion on team apparel, decorations and of course the traditional menu of pizza, nachos, beer, hoagies, chili and other goodies - like chicken wings. Americans will scarf down 1.3 million of them according to the National Chicken Council, a meticulous industry group which says this figure is up by 3 percent since last year. Not to be outdone, Dominos expects to sell 12 million pizzas.

FILE - In this July 9, 2015 file photo, a Wall Street sign is seen near the New York Stock Exchange in New York. U.S. stocks moved lower on the last day of the year as the market headed for a sluggish end to 2015. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Who is best to reform Wall Street?

In order to reform the financial industry, the next President needs to understand what the fixes should be or risk an overreaction that makes the excesses worse.

Trump, Cruz not right for U.S.

I have always believed the people of Iowa to generally be good-natured, decent individuals who make up the heartland of America. That image has sustained a hard hit with the stunning and sad selection of Republican candidates Sen. Ted Cruz and Donald Trump as front-runners in the Iowa presidential caucuses.

Article V convention for change

Republican presidential hopeful Sen. Marco Rubio is correct: The federal government is out of control ("Marco Rubio amplifies call for constitutional convention, courts conservative voters"). Our national debt will soon be $20 trillion, and that does not even include the close-to-$100-trillion in unfunded liabilities.

President Barack Obama closes his eyes while a prayer is made at the National Prayer Breakfast in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 4, 2016. The annual event brings together U.S. and international leaders from different parties and religions for an hour devoted to faith. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The profits of doom

"Doomsayer" is probably not on Al Gore's resume but it's as descriptive as "almost president." It perfectly describes the attention he has attracted in the decade since he took to the stage at the Sundance Film Festival and set off global warming fears with his agitprop film, "An Inconvenient Truth."

ASSOCIATED PRESS
Herds of Asian elephants in Malaysia's Taman Negara National Park in Pahang state are apparently larger than feared, according to an examination of the dung they leave behind.

A dilemma for Jumbo

Liberty and freedom are man's natural desires, but like everything else liberation is complicated, as man and elephant are learning in Myanmar, or Burma as it was called for centuries. Myanmar is making its way back into the real world after sitting it out in isolation for almost a hundred years.

Arrogant Iranian Actions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iranian arrogance

Iran's recent capture of two U.S. Navy 47-foot Riverine Command Boats (RCBs) that were on a routine transit from Kuwait to Bahrain on January 12 is another example of the arrogance and contempt Iran holds for America and our political leadership.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Widow'

"The Widow" arrives from England recommended as "twisty psychological suspense" and "an electrifying debut thriller." It's not either of these. It's more like a jigsaw puzzle. From the get-go you know how the final picture looks: in this case, you soon realize that Glen Taylor is the villain who abducted two-year old Bella Elliott.

Russian President Vladimir Putin announced the deployment of S-400 missiles in Syria as he and other officials in Moscow escalated a war of words with Ankara after Tuesday's shootdown, which Turkey claims was justified on grounds that two Russian fighters ignored repeated warnings to change direction after entering Turkish airspace. (Associated Press)

The threat to peace accelerates

Despite his deteriorating economy, Russia's Vladimir Putin is taking an increasingly aggressive tone of support for the Assad regime in Syria. He has tried to keep the Damascus corpse alive but can show little evidence of success against his opponents, some of whom have ties to international Islamic terrorism.

Racism still a U.S. problem

Those who say we no longer have a problem with race relations in the United States are either blind or ignoring the facts. In 1962, my mother became enraged when a cousin, who at the time was a police officer in Dodge City, Kan., said that the "problem" of Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. and the civil rights movement could be solved by marching every black American into the deserts of Nevada and dropping a couple of hydrogen bombs.

Republican presidential candidate, Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, poses for photographs after a campaign event at the Johnson County Fairgrounds, Sunday, Jan. 31, 2016 in Iowa City, Iowa. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Looking for the magic

Iowa isn't about actually winning, but persuading the political correspondents and prospective voters in the states following to think they see a winner. It's not even about delegates won, or the order in which a candidate finishes, but whether the result can be spun as a victory.