Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Sen. Elizabeth Warren. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Democrats search for another Lost Cause

- The Washington Times

Union scouts have already discovered Robert E. Lee at the gates of the city, lining up the gallant Pelham’s artillery to fire the opening round, and Stonewall Jackson and Jeb Stuart are expected to arrive on a night train from the Shenandoah Valley.

Illustration on diplomatic options for North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Red-teaming’ the diplomatic option in Korea

Should President Trump meet personally with Kim Jong-un? John Glover, a graduate student at George Mason University wrote an article advocating such a meeting and, frankly, I think that he’s on to something.

Trump's Go-ahead for Infrastructure Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Repairing, updating and expanding infrastructure

One of the biggest barriers to investment in infrastructure all across the United States is the long, costly, and unpredictable permitting process. If you have any doubts, just consider the Keystone XL pipeline extension.

Hatred of the Jews returns with a flourish

Anti-Semitism and white supremacy are far from dead in the United States of America. That’s what this past weekend’s violence told the world.

Illustration on men and women in the workplace and attitudes on gender roles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scapegoats, dupes and gulls

Identity politics has gone over the top, and the flood of intolerance is drenching everyone. What began as a campaign to re-right injustice has created injustice. What was meant to change attitudes toward intolerance has become intolerance enthroned.

Illustration on North Korea's backing down by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Armageddon postponed

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un appears to have blinked and President Trump can claim a foreign policy victory and justification for his strategy.

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

Charlottesville and the loss of America’s sanity

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, bombarded in a speech on infrastructure with repetitive and aggressive questions about Charlottesville, made clear — again — that violence, bigotry and racism in all its many forms, in all its various shapes, were not to be tolerated. He dared to defend his initial Charlottesville comments, and for that, the mainstream media has determined, he must die.

Illustration on the challenges of setting standards for selective immigration policy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Immigration reform for a more prosperous America

America’s immigration policy sorely needs modernization. By endorsing reforms offered by Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue, President Trump offers Congress an opportunity to better consider how new arrivals can contribute to national prosperity.

Illustration of Paul Nitze     The Washington Times

The road not taken to nuclear disarmament

Why have so many been so shocked by this latest episode of brinkmanship over the threat of a nuclear war with the unhinged dictatorship in North Korea? It is worth remembering that we have had plenty of warning that such a horrific showdown was headed our way. Indeed, 18 years ago, America’s leading authority on nuclear arms strategy explicitly laid out the stark risks that faced us unless we changed our ways.

Jihad Axis Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Qatar crisis

Qatar’s role in undermining the stability of the Sunni Islamic world is undisputed, and is on a par with that of Iran. Qatar has used the Doha-based Al Jazeera media network to conduct a propaganda war against its Sunni rivals, and also provided massive funding for terrorist militias to undercut its less-jihadist Sunni neighbors.

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

The deadly impact of identity politics

In the aftermath of the horror of the Charlottesville riot, there’s been less condemnation by the media and the left of the neo-Nazi that is charged with murdering Heather Heyer and injuring at least 19 others than there has been of President Trump.

Illustration on the need for a U.S. comprehensive peace strategy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

In search of a grand U.S. strategy

Richard Nixon’s rapprochement with China, the end of the Cold War, President Obama’s outreach to “the Muslim world,” the growth of the (largely American-funded) United Nations — weren’t such developments supposed to lead to a safer world, one in which the “international community” would embrace “universal values” and pursue common interests — peace and security key among them?

Related Articles

Illustration on Kim's attachment to nuclear weapons by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'Juche' or consequences

- The Washington Times

Its ideological commitment to nuclear weapons means North Korea will never disarm peacefully

Mr. Trump's LGBT tweets

The Washington Times

Lawyers are always looking for clients, but — until now — they have to find a client who has actually suffered harm before filing a lawsuit seeking damages for harm. But lawyers for five newly reconstructed women, each identified only as Jane Doe to preserve anonymity, have filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court in Washington arguing that President Trump's tweet that he would bar transsexuals from serving in the military services violates both the Equal Protection clause of the 14th Amendment and the due process clause of the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution.

In this Sept. 24, 2011, file photo, George Soros speaks during a forum at the IMF/World Bank annual meetings in Washington. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta, File)

George Soros hitting U.S. Lobby Town hard

- The Washington Times

Billionaire George Soros, no doubt still reeling from the White House win of President Donald Trump, has decided to pour even more money into Congress, in hopes of furthering his progressive visions, a new report finds. And this, ladies and gentlemen, is why you shouldn't trust any member of Congress

Alissa Ellis chants while blocking an intersection during a rally Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Durham, N.C. Protesters toppled a nearly century-old statue of a Confederate soldier Monday at the rally against racism. The Durham protest was in response to a white nationalist rally held in Charlottesville, Va., over the weekend. (Casey Toth/The Herald-Sun via AP)

Confederate statues today, book burnings tomorrow

- The Washington Times

A crowd of ignorant protesters pulled down a bronze Confederate statue that stood before a county government building in Durham, North Carolina -- the angry national backlash to the Charlottesville brouhaha over the Robert E. Lee monument.

President Donald Trump walks across the tarmac to board Air Force One at Morristown Municipal Airport, Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. Trump is traveling back to Washington to sign an executive order at the White House and then later today travels to New York City. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump on Charlottesville: Danged if he does, danged if he doesn't

- The Washington Times

The immediate aftermath of the widely reported Charlottesville violence wasn't so much a media look at the issues, or the car-plowing suspect and victims, or even the demographics of the protesters -- that many came from out of state to stand strong against a small-town statue of Robert E. Lee -- as it was a cause to criticize President Donald Trump. But why all the angst against the president?

How a screenwriter faced his own 'High Noon'

Some books are interesting but not entertaining, while other books are just the opposite. But every once in a while a book comes along that it is both entertaining and interesting. Glenn Frankel's "High Noon" is such a book. It is the best nonfiction book I have read in a decade.

Illustration on Kim's attachment to nuclear weapons by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'Juche' or consequences

"Juche" -- the ideology of North Korea -- compels unquestioned obedience to the "supreme leader," who is exalted as the greatest source of political thought. It is enforced by fear and murder even among the elite and accounts for the Kim regime's paranoia and belligerence.

Illustration on white supremacist groups by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tragedy in Charlottesville

In the South during the Jim Crow era, the "one-drop rule," codified into law, asserted that if a person had just one drop of African-American blood, they were considered "black." I wonder what we'd learn if we gave former KKK leader David Duke and the "white nationalists" who caused havoc in Charlottesville last Saturday a DNA test to determine their racial makeup?

Benjamin Franklin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A riot with an unwelcome lesson

- The Washington Times

The media mob wasted no time in descending on Charlottesville, and the first order of business was to exploit the bigotry, tragedy and evil to make it the work of the Republicans, conservatives, and above all, Donald Trump.

Illustration on the challenge for Trump posed by North Korea by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

Making the best of a bad nuclear hand

- The Washington Times

That so many of the nation's leading Democrats believe President Trump poses a greater threat to world peace than the mad dog leader of a nuclearized North Korea says more about them than either the president or Kim Jong-un.

A THAAD missile being launched       Associated Press photo

Toward a more muscular missile defense

An air of fatalism surrounds much of the coverage of the escalating tensions between North Korea and the United States. If Pyongyang launched a missile at us or at one of our allies, the feeling goes, we could do nothing but brace ourselves for catastrophic damage and loss of life.

Only children can defy perceptions

"Breaking the 'only child' stereotype mold" (Web, Aug. 11) asserts that only children continue to debunk the myth of being selfish, spoiled and self-centered. As an only child, I can attest to the fact that since my singular entrance into the world, I have experienced bias, which is shattered as individuals get to know me.

The USS Gerald Ford         U.S. Navy

'A 100,000-ton message to the world'

As an old Navy man who served as a young enlisted sailor on the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk during the Vietnam War, I was pleased and proud to see the U.S. Navy's newest aircraft carrier, the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), join America's fleet.

People watch a TV screen showing a local news program reporting about North Korean military's plans to launch missiles into waters near Guam, with an image of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, at Seoul Train Station in Seoul, South Korea, Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017. North Korea said Tuesday that leader Kim Jong Un was briefed on his military's plans to launch missiles into waters near Guam as part of an effort to create "enveloping fire" near the U.S. military hub in the Pacific. The letters read "Kim Jong Un, would watch a little more U.S.'s behavior." (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

A wise word from the past

"Experience is the teacher of all things," said Julius Caesar. The mighty ruler of Rome would know, but considering the ancient emperor's pointed encounter with sharp knives some things can be better learned through observation at a safe distance.

'Far right' not to blame

As odious as we may find those "white nationalists" or neo-Nazi groups, they were not the responsible parties for the violence in Charlottesville last weekend ("Pence calls white supremacists 'dangerous fringe groups,' defends Trump's call for unity," Web, Aug. 13).

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One during his departure from Andrews Air Force Base, Md., Monday, Aug. 14, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Mr. Trump's LGBT tweets

Lawyers are always looking for clients, but -- until now --they have to find a client who has actually suffered harm before filing a lawsuit seeking damages for harm. But lawyers for five newly reconstructed women, each identified only as Jane Doe to preserve anonymity, have filed a lawsuit in the U.S. District Court in Washington arguing that President Trump's tweet that he would bar transsexuals from serving in the military services violates both the Equal Protection clause of the 14th Amendment and the due process clause of the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution.