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Robert E. Lee. (Associated Press)

The showboating student, hard at work

- The Washington Times

There is much to do for the student with awakened conscience. Scrubbing out the moral stains on America, to make the grove of academe the bright spot of the fruited plain, is a job bigger than anyone first imagined.

Illustration on advice to the GOP on reducing the size of government by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Cutting government down to size

The GOP debates so far have shown that the Republican presidential candidates are far from united on how best to boost the economy. Tax and regulatory reform are critical. But as a first step they should consider following the path Democrats took immediately after World War II: shrink the government.

Illustration on justified concerns over receiving Syrian "refugees" into the United States by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A compassionate and cautious approach to refugees

Americans always have welcomed those fleeing danger and oppression abroad. Some of the earliest Americans crossed the Atlantic to escape religious persecution in Great Britain.

Intelligence Failure Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The CENTCOM Syndrome

Every member of the military has a personal duty to report the facts they encounter truthfully to their superiors. That goes for everyone from the lowliest private to the four-star generals who report directly to the president.

Illustration on the Republican response to the Democrats' championing of the $15 minimum wage by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Working a wedge issue

Given the increased polarization of the electorate, expect to see more issue-based fighting to influence the opinions of independent voters. These are the voters who do not follow the letter after a candidate name. They have a different North Star than party designation.

Illustration on fighting terrorism with energy independence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The ill-timed climate change talk

President Obama has been mocked and appropriately so for his ludicrous comment that the upcoming climate change summit in Paris will be a “powerful rebuke” to the terrorists. No. This summit is a powerful rebuke to common sense.

U.S. Donation to Terror Group Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Funding terrorists

The United States, in the form of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) is providing $100,000 to an organization directly linked to financing terrorism.

Illustration on the monetization of refugees by the United Nations and U.S. government agencies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Creating isolation, not assimilation

Despite the exposure refugee resettlement has received lately, there has been little discussion of how the program actually operates.

Magical Rate Increase Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Obama ducks responsibility

The Federal Reserve is President Obama’s last chance for ducking responsibility for America’s weak economy. For seven years, Mr. Obama and Democrats have blamed George W. Bush and Republicans for an economy that has underperformed throughout this administration. With that excuse growing ever less plausible, and an election looming, Mr. Obama and Democrats need a new economic excuse; higher interest rates from the Fed offers them just that.

Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko, right, and Azerbaijan President Ilham Aliyev pose for a photo in Minsk, Belarus, Saturday, Nov. 28, 2015. Aliyev arrived in Belarus for a two-day official visit. (AP Photo/Sergei Grits)

Hypocrisy from Foggy Bottom

On November 1, Azerbaijan’s ruling New Azerbaijan Party won 70 of a 125 seats in that country’s parliament in an election largely boycotted by the main opposition party.

George H. W. Bush   Associated Press photo

Weak, confused and ‘unable to grasp’

- The Washington Times

Many bad things happen when a leader is weak, confused and forever in search of a credible reason to do nothing. For all his softness on Islam, Barack Obama has little insight into the men who send out mobs to cry “death to America.” He can’t imagine that men can listen to the call to evening Muslim prayer, which so captivated him as a boy growing up in Indonesia — “the prettiest sound on Earth” — and be inspired to dream of bringing down death on America.

Illustration on NOAA's climate change fictions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

NOAA’s climate change science fiction

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is the nation’s leading collector of climate data. Every day, NOAA analyzes vast amounts of data to predict changes to our climate, weather, oceans and coasts. The agency also publishes monthly temperature averages across the nation and compares those numbers to historical temperature records.

The Invincible Obama Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Behind Obama’s lack of leadership

President Truman’s decision to drop the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki killed more than 200,000 civilians but stopped a war that had already killed tens of millions and could have wiped out millions more.

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Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan gestures as he talks during a news conference at the end of the G-20 summit in Antalya, Turkey, Monday, Nov. 16, 2015. The leaders of the Group of 20 wrapped up their two-day summit near the Turkish Mediterranean coastal city of Antalya Monday against the backdrop of heavy French bombardment of the Islamic State's stronghold in Syria. The bombings marked a significant escalation of France's role in the fight against the extremist group. (Anadolu Agency via AP, Pool)

A new crisis in an old place

These are scary times. Miscalculations can be expensive, paid for by everyone. The shooting of a mere archduke set off World War I, and Japanese militarists thought they saw an unarmed America too proud to fight, and ordered the raid on Pearl Harbor. The Arab nations thought Israel would fold under attack, and started two wars that ended with the Arab nations folding like the accordion.

Recall Roosevelt's message

President Franklin D. Roosevelt gave his 1941 State of the Union address to Congress as Europe was going up in flames. A true leader, Roosevelt spoke of the values that this nation, while imperfect, tried to make a reality.

In this Feb. 11, 2014, file photo, then-Defense Intelligence Agency Director Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Lauren Victoria Burke, File)

When the spooks get it wrong

Washington is awash in intelligence agencies, some of civilians and others of the military services, 17 by one count, and a lot of what they produce is gobbledygook. Like all bureaucracies, the intelligence agencies want to protect their turf first, and writing in words (many coined on the spot) that only a small audience can understand is a way of protecting the turf.

The Approval of Technical Wrong Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the gun-ignorant make gun laws

When the state of Maryland quietly killed off its 15-year, $5 million social experiment in gun control -- so-called "ballistic fingerprinting" -- it served up the latest example of people who know nothing about firearms making technical laws about guns. The news of this latest failure (not a single crime solved in 15 years) followed New York shutting down a similar program, and it generated from gun owners and gun makers a tired "We told you so."

Air Force Tech Sgt. Aaron Allmon           Associated Press photo

A military witch hunt that almost succeeded

Along with many Americans, I salute The Washington Times for having the courage to not only report on the Air Force general court martial persecution-prosecution of Air Force Tech Sgt. Aaron Allmon, but to continue following this case with a series of updates from the courtroom trial in Minot, N.D., until the court martial concluded on Nov. 14.

NATO Safe Area for Refugees Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Responding to humanitarian catastrophe

The international community just celebrated the 20th anniversary of the Dayton Accords, a landmark peace agreement that brought an end to the Bosnian War and a grave humanitarian crisis in the Balkans.

BOOK REVIEW: 'American Dreams: Restoring Economic Opportunity for Everyone'

Political polls, although increasingly iffy and unreliable, have become a growth industry, with the national media, caught up in a relentless wave of cutbacks and downsizing, routinely using them as primary sources for stories -- a practice no editor would have countenanced not too many years ago.

Illustration on the processing of national security intelligence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Memo to presidential campaign advisers

This memorandum is addressed to the brave souls advising presidential candidates. As you know, the recent terrorist attacks in France -- and in Mali, Nigeria, Cameroon, Egypt, Lebanon, Turkey and Israel -- have altered the political landscape. With less than a year to go before the 2016 election, the landscape may stay altered even if there are no more attacks -- and that seems unlikely.

Illustration on the need for streamlines conceal carry permits in Washington, DC by Alexander Hunter/the Washington Times

Fighting ISIS with concealed carry

Following the recent Paris attacks, the Islamic State recently announced its intention to "strike America at its center," in Washington, D.C. Our response should be swift and decisive.

The Battle for Israeli Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The return of a 47-year-old headline

I was thumbing through an old magazine over the weekend. It was 47 years old to be exact, and I came across a surprisingly prescient piece entitled wittily, "The Arab, the Jew, and the Pickle." What particularly caught my eye was that the piece was written by me in what is now called The American Spectator. Imagine that.

MS St. Louis, 1939. The Voyage of Doom.

Stopping the next Holocaust

By now, in the days following the Paris massacre and the Brussels lockdown, many Americans have been reminded of the awful fate of the S.S. Saint Louis. In 1939, fleeing the impending doom of the Holocaust, some 900 Jews boarded the cruise ship in Hamburg, Germany, and crossed the Atlantic.

France and Russia join forces to fight terror

It's been a couple of weeks that shook the world -- a world that watched in horror a series of tragic acts in Russia, Lebanon, France, Nigeria, Mali, and other places perpetrated by terrorist organizations.

Thanksgiving dinner. (Associated Press)

Restoring a sense of gratitude

Many Americans still believe in this nation's enduring principlesIt's easy, alas, for our gratitude to become perfunctory -- more something we say than something we feel. But take it from someone who has traveled to many countries: A look at what some people around the globe endure can make your appreciation genuine.

Illustration on advances in the world's situation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A bounty of good news

Your Thanksgiving dinner is going to be less expensive. This year the average person will need to work 2 hours, 21 minutes and 57 seconds to pay for all the items in a standard Thanksgiving dinner for 10 people -- a work reduction of one minute and 8 seconds from last year.

Former President George W. Bush speaks at the George W. Bush Institute at Southern Methodist University in Dallas on Feb. 19, 2014. (Associated Press) **FILE**

How Obama cooks the terrorism numbers

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama has given an eloquent testimony to a Christian faith, but his sympathies are always with Islam. He insisted from Asia that "99.9 percent of Muslims worldwide reject terrorism," and that's good news, if true. But it clearly is not.

Black-eye Friday Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Wal-Mart's protests won't sell

For most Americans, Black Friday is the time to shop around for great deals on new Christmas gifts. For Big Labor, it's an opportunity to steal the headlines and advance its agenda.

U.S. President Barack Obama attends the 10th East Asia Summit at the 27th ASEAN Summit in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, Sunday, Nov. 22, 2015. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)

President Obama's overseas offensive

When a president goes abroad to defend his strategy for defeating an enemy — and the right word here is "enemy," not "rival" or "adversary" — it's a concession that whether he says it explicitly or not, his strategy has failed. Even members of his own party have at last put partisan loyalty aside and openly challenged the president's failed "leadership from behind."

In this Thursday, Nov. 19, 2015 photo, opposition presidential candidate Mauricio Macri waves to supporters during the closing campaign rally in Humahuaca, Jujuy, Argentina. Macri will face the ruling party candidate Daniel Scioli in a Nov. 22 runoff. (AP Photo/Natacha Pisarenko)

Hope for change in Argentina

There's something hopeful to sing about in the Argentine. The election of Mauricio Macri, 56, the center-right mayor of Buenos Aires, as the new president is an attempt — the latest — to write permanent finis to the Peronista epoch in the nation's history.

Syrian 'Tourist' Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Terrorists as 'tourists'

President Obama has put a new twist on the Islamic invasion now taking place across Europe and the United States. Speaking to reporters last week during his visit to the Philippines, the president compared Syrian refugees to "tourists," saying they are no bigger a threat than people who come to sightsee and visit attractions.