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Bankruptcy is the only way Greece can fashion a new beginning

Almost every option facing debt-drenched Greece is bad, but there is only one that will end this Greek tragedy for good. Let Greece go bankrupt. Then let this once-rich nation, hit the restart button to rebuild its economy.

U.S. President Ronald Reagan gestures as Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev looks on after their third session of talks at the Hofdi in Reykjavik, Oct. 12, 1986. (AP Photo/Ron Edmonds)

Obama’s Reykjavik moment

The choice for the president on the Iran nuclear talks is clear: walk away with dignity or appease and submit in disgrace.

Obama’s Clean Power Plan could push millions of minority Americans into poverty

This summer the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will finalize its carbon-dioxide emission regulations under President Obama’s Clean Power Plan. The EPA’s own data projects the regulations will reduce global carbon by less than 1 percent and sea level rise by one one-hundredth of an inch. The price Americans will pay for these “benefits” is layoffs and increased energy rates. Yet for the nation’s most vulnerable, the impacts will be far worse, pushing millions into poverty.

‘Death with dignity’ is often coerced by those with financial interests

Earlier this year, legislation was introduced to the D.C. Council that would legalize physician-assisted suicide in our nation’s capital for an adult patient diagnosed with a terminal condition and less than six months to live. Although this initiative has been introduced in 24 states this year (not passing in any so far), its passage in the District of Columbia this year risks setting a dangerous precedent for the rest of the nation.

(Photo courtesy of The White House)

The surging truth-tellers of the GOP

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump is surging in New Hampshire, and Chris Christie’s back on the hunt, sounding like a born-again contender. They’re both long shots — the Donald is off the board — but they’re making the kind of noise the wiseheads say they can’t make.

Members of left wing parties hold placards reading in Greek ''NO'' next to a Presidential Guard, Evzonas, during a protest outside the Greek Parliament in Athens, Sunday, June 28, 2015. Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras says the Bank of Greece has recommended that banks remain closed and restrictions be imposed on transactions, after the European Central Bank didn't increase the amount of emergency liquidity the lenders can access from the central bank. (AP Photo/Daniel Ochoa de Olza)

The Greeks should vote “no!”

Voting “no” offers Greeks some prospects for better solutions, whereas voting “yes” guarantees penury.

Illustration on the uncontrolled growth of Federal banking regulation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The squeeze of regulatory kudzu

It is called the vine that ate the South. Kudzu was first introduced at the 1876 Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia as an ornamental plant for home gardens. It pretty much stayed that way for half a century, until the federal government got involved. The Roosevelt administration decided that kudzu would be helpful against soil erosion and made it a mission of the Soil Erosion Service to plant kudzu all across the South. Now kudzu covers 12,000 square miles. Kudzu is estimated to smother another 150,000 acres each year.

Energy Independence Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A declaration of energy independence

The United States is closer than ever before to fulfilling the vision of our Founding Fathers. By achieving energy independence, we can achieve freedom from foreign influence.

Fireworks Warning Label Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The sticky legalisms of wacky warning labels

Not too long ago, common sense ruled the day, so called because it was shared by nearly everybody. Common values, commonly understood sense of right and wrong, just and unjust, all expressed in a common language of fairness.

Illustration on raising the minimum wage in light of its effect on Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Puerto Rico’s minimum-wage object lesson

A report released by the Puerto Rican government this week fingers the territory’s minimum wage as a prime factor in its emerging debt crisis. Though its economy is significantly less developed than even the poorest American states, it is still subject to the federal $7.25 minimum wage, 77 percent of its median wage. This high wage floor acts as a significant employment barrier, contributing to the island’s pathetic 43 percent labor force participation rate and its economic stagnation in general.

Illustration on lower-cost tailored television choices by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

TV with a choice

Question: What do rabid football fans, working moms and Clifford the Big Red Dog viewers have in common?

Related Articles

Illustration on connections between Rolling Stone's reporter and the Departmwent of Education in the UVA "rape" case by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Education Department's Rolling Stone reckoning

When one journalist (Chuck Ross of The Daily Caller) made a Freedom of Information Act request of the U.S. Department of Education about possible involvement of federal officials in the now-discredited Rolling Stone story, "A Rape on Campus," the department sent him a box with a CD in it.

 Office of Personnel Management (OPM) Director Katherine Archuleta testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington in June. FILE (Associated Press)

Compromised cybersecurity

We can add cybersecurity to the list of things Washington can't seem to handle. Given the enormous dimensions of recent data breaches suffered by keepers of federal employee records, it's apparent that the government's barriers to hackers are about as airtight as a screen door would be on a submarine. Americans working for the government shouldn't have to worry that their personal information is scrutinized by their counterparts in Beijing. Trust is a two-way street, and a government that compromises the privacy of its own hardly deserves trust.

A book and flowers lay at the scene of the attack in Sousse, Tunisia, Sunday, June 28, 2015. (AP Photo/Abdeljalil Bounhar)

Observing Ramadan with murder

Ramadan is Islam's period of religious reflection and observance, but this year, radical Muslims are making it a ritual of mayhem and murder. An outburst of attacks on innocents last week killed dozens. Traditionally a time of fasting to honor the Prophet Muhammad's first revelation of the Koran, the Islamic holy book, this year the leader of the Islamic State called his followers to make the month-long holiday a "calamity for the infidels." Ramadan comes to an end on July 17, but the killing almost certainly won't.

Illustration on the value of the U.S. Constitution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'We the People'

"We the People." We've heard that phrase so often it's easy to overlook its significance. But as we mark our nation's birthday, we should take a moment to ask ourselves: What is the role of the people?

The Washington Times. (Note: Ex-Im Bank does not directly finance military exports.)

Shut down the Export-Import Bank

Closing down the Ex-Im Bank is an important first step in the battle against the unhealthy marriage between the government and corporate America.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Days of Rage'

DAYS OF RAGE: AMERICA'S RADICAL UNDERGROUND, THE FBI, AND THE FORGOTTEN AGE OF REVOLUTIONARY VIOLENCE

Hillary Clinton spins her wheels

You don't need to be in New York City to notice the Hillary Clown Car is rolling along at full speed. It would, however, be dangerous to underestimate Hillary Clinton, the Democrats' likely nominee for the 2016 presidential contest, but as I've noted several times on Fox News, we are reminded time and again how this woman lost to an unknown, inexperienced lawyer from Chicago in 2008.

A new Hillary Clinton comic book does not leave out Benghazi (Bluewater Productions

Hillary Clinton comic book addresses Benghazi, email questions, 2016 and more

- The Washington Times

Frame by frame, moment by moment: a new Hillary Clinton comic book has now entered the political marketplce. From Bluewater Productions comes "Female Force: Hillary Clinton: The Road to the White House," which asks such probing questions as this: "Can she run on her record? Her likability? And how will lingering questions about Benghazi and her email inform her choice?"

In 2016, one way out

President Obama is making it painfully clear that he will leave a monarchial legacy of social, political and economic pain, severely diminished national security and racial discontent. Indeed, if elected, Hillary Clinton would leave a similar legacy, including gender discontent.

Atrocities aren't campaign stops

When President Obama came forth to condemn the recent slayings at a Charleston church, he delivered a political statement about guns, in effect making the situation about his agenda and disregarding the feelings of the families who were suffering a great loss. Hillary Clinton did the same thing, crafting her public comments about the atrocity in order to serve her own purposes. These two narcissists acted like children saying 'Look at me' instead of politicians giving thoughtful responses to mourners.

National Public Radio has transformed its Studio 4A into a war room for election night coverage. About 60 to 80 people will be answering phones, updating the Web site, NPR.org, and broadcasting live from about 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. on election night. (Barbara L. Salisbury/The Washington Times)

Snark and bias alert

Prime Minister David Cameron is a brave man. He has undertaken to take control and oversight of the prestigious BBC, the government broadcasting system, away from the arrogant elites and put the oversight into the hands of the people who pay for it.

In this April 28, 2015, file photo, demonstrators stand in front of a rainbow flag of the Supreme Court in Washington, as the court was set to hear historic arguments in cases that could make same-sex marriage the law of the land. Gay and lesbian couples could face legal chaos if the Supreme Court rules against same-sex marriage in the next few weeks. Same-sex weddings could come to a halt in many states, depending on a confusing mix of lower-court decisions and the sometimes-contradictory views of state and local officials. Among the 36 states in which same-sex couples can now marry are 20 in which federal judges invoked the Constitution to strike down marriage bans. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

The coup d'etat by the Supreme Court

Five justices of the U.S. Supreme Court are clearly afflicted with the royalty disease. They imagine themselves to be the rightful heirs of Louis XIV of France, who famously declared himself to be the state — "l'etat c'est moi" — with no questions asked. The justices, like the king, think they can do anything they want.

Illustration on medicinal marijuana by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

The curative side of cannabis

Imagine the following scenario: You have a son or daughter who suffers from epilepsy. Seizures wrack your child's body every day. Some days, he or she endures a dozen or more seizures. The condition prevents your child from going to school, from eating normally, from having friends. It also exacts a toll on you and your family. You cannot leave your child alone for any extended period of time, and certain activities, such as sports games, road trips or visits to the movie theater, are off limits.

Chart to accompany Moore article of June 29, 2015

Good roads shouldn't cost more money

It's summertime, and that means millions of Americans cramming in their minivans and crisscrossing around the country on family vacation. But how safe are the roads, and will they be backed up for miles of gridlock?

China's dream is America's nightmare

For decades, China analysts have been asking the question, "What is China's Grand Strategy?" Nowhere, it seemed, had PRC officials ever publicly discussed their country's future place in the world.

Iran Terror Curriculum Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What Tehran teaches its kids

For clues to Iran's long-range strategy, study what the regime consistently teaches its students about war, peace, jihad and the goals of revolution, says an Israeli scholar in Jerusalem. In the "game of thrones" in the Middle East, a thorough study of what is taught in the K-12 curriculum of Iran may tell us more than whispers heard in the ayatollah's court.

Illustration on risks in the current housing market by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Racing to a new housing crisis

Remember when Barney Frank insisted in 2003 that "Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac are not in a crisis," and "I want to roll the dice a little bit more in this situation toward subsidized housing?"

FILE - In this Monday, June 16, 2014 file photo, demonstrators chant pro-Islamic State group slogans as they wave the group's flags in front of the provincial government headquarters in Mosul, 225 miles (360 kilometers) northwest of Baghdad, Iraq. (AP Photo/File)

Nervous: 58% of American voters say President Obama 'too soft' on Islamic extremists

- The Washington Times

"American voters think Barack Obama is too soft on Islamic extremists, and that the U.S. fight against them is going badly," says Fox News analyst Dana Blanton. The network has released a new poll revealing that 58 percent of Americans think the president is too easy on the extremists, including nearly four in 10 Democrats (37 percent) plus 57 percent of independents and 83 percent of Republicans.