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GRENELL: The midterm elections and Iran

The midterm elections may be the last chance to stop the Obama administration from reaching a disastrous nuclear deal with Iran.

Federal Health Officer Dr. Rupert Blue, the bubonic plague virus, a view of San Francisco in 1904 and a rat caught and exterminated in the city       The Washington Times

Unwelcome as the 1900-1904 plague

If Americans suspected of carrying the Ebola virus are upset about federal and state quarantine regulations and threaten court action, it brings to mind a situation that existed in San Francisco from 1900 to 1904 when bubonic plague cases arose in the city’s Chinatown.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton, right, campaigns for Maryland Democratic gubernatorial candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, left, during a rally at the University of Maryland, Thursday, Oct. 30, 2014, in College Park, Md. (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

Signs of a coming Republican wave

It’s almost a foregone conclusion that President Obama and the Democrats are going to suffer a humiliating defeat in next week’s midterm elections.

Illustration by TOM, Trouw, Amsterdam, Netherlands

Desperate for a deal with Iran

President Obama thinks he has succeeded in remaking America, but so far his foreign-policy legacy has been a flop.

Illustration on increasing American cultural and political support for life by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pro-life wins at the ballot box

With the recent collapse of the liberal establishment’s favorite “war on women” screed, it’s time to acknowledge a little discussed political truth: Life is a winning issue.

Donald Trump poses for photographs during a ground-breaking ceremony for the Trump International Hotel on the site of the Old Post Office in Washington on July 23, 2014. (Associated Press) **FILE**

‘A new kind of hell to pay’

- The Washington Times

“Muddling through” is not an inspiring strategy for any president. Barack Obama’s administration is a muddle, as anyone can see, and everyone can see that he’s through as a leader, just when a leader is needed to reassure a frightened nation.

Regaining congressional prerogatives

The House and Senate leadership of the next Congress should establish a Joint Committee on Regaining and Defending Congressional Prerogatives and Responsibilities.

Liberties Lost Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The presumption of liberty

In the years following the adoption of the Constitution, before he was secretary of state under President Thomas Jefferson and then president himself, James Madison, who wrote the Constitution, was a member of the House of Representatives.

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Former Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks during a "Women for Maloney" event in Somers, N.Y., Monday, Oct. 27, 2014. Clinton was there to support Rep. Sean Maloney who is running against Nan Hayworth in New York's 18th congressional district. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

EDITORIAL: The politics of pander

A secretary of state could, for example, spark a nasty international incident by mixing up the Republic of China and the People's Republic of China, two nations that don't get along. The "reset button" in U.S.-Russian relations aside, Hillary Clinton's gaffes as the nation's chief diplomat didn't encourage many full-scale invasions.

This undated file image shows the website for updated HealthCare,gov, a federal government website managed by the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service. HealthCare.gov, the online portal for health insurance under President Barack Obama’s health care law, has been revamped as its second enrollment season approaches. And other major provisions of the Affordable Care Act are taking effect for the first time. A look at website and program changes for consumers and taxpayers: Old: 76 screens to muddle through in insurance application. New: 16 screens _ for the basic application that most new customers will use. But about a third of those new customers are expected to have more complicated cases, and how they’ll fare remains to be seen.  (AP Photo/file)

The facts behind Obamacare's numbers

"Is the Affordable Care Act Working?" reads a recent headline in The New York Times. The editors then consider a series of questions, the first of which is pretty basic: "Has the percentage of uninsured people been reduced?"

House Teetering Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Reinflating the housing bubble

The Obama administration announced it wants to provide a little more juice to the now-lackluster housing market by bending the home lending rules to make it easier for banks to make loans and marginal buyers to take on a mortgage.

BOOK REVIEW: 'What Fools These Mortals Be!'

Creating a memorable cartoon, be it a single illustration, comic strip, comic book or animated feature, is an enormous achievement. Creating a memorable editorial, or political, cartoon is the equivalent of drinking from the nectar of the gods.

IRS Extinguishes Liberty Torch Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Either liberty or the IRS

After last week's ruling wherein a federal court failed to permanently bar the Internal Revenue Service from targeting conservative groups, there can be no doubt that liberty and the IRS are incompatible.

This undated handout image provided by Gehry Partners, LLP shows an aerial perspective of Eisenhower Square looking along Maryland Avenue, SW and Independence Avenue in Washington. A key arts panel has approved a revised design for a memorial to honor President Dwight D. Eisenhower in Washington, which could clear the way for groundbreaking. The U.S. Commission of Fine Arts voted Thursday, Oct. 16 to approve Frank Gehry's design. A federal planning agency also recently approved the design. (AP Photo/Gehry Partners, LLP)

Building Ike’s memorial

The history of Washington's memorial wars proves that the Eisenhower Memorial will ultimately be built.

Illustration on equal rights and fair opportunities in American society by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'Careful' discrimination is still discrimination

In 2004, a young Illinois state senator took the podium at the Democratic National Convention and proclaimed, "There is not a black America and a white America and Latino America and Asian America; there's the United States of America."