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Hiroshima

No second thoughts about a bomb for Hiroshima

- The Washington Times

The pointless debate continues. As reliable as the arrival of the scorching heat and drenching humidity of August, comes the debate (mostly by academics) over whether the United States is guilty of moral outrage for having dropped the atomic bombs on Japan on Aug. 6 and 9, 1945, to put an end to the carnage of World War II.

Illustration on the virtues of the private Donald Trump               The Washington Times

The two Donald Trumps

Love him or hate him, no one has been able to figure out Donald Trump. No one, that is, except Norma Foerderer.

Illustration on Russian advances in the arctic by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Playing catch-up in the Arctic

The U.S. Government Accountability Office says that the Obama administration is forcing our military to measure ice levels in the resources-rich Arctic. The president’s thinking, according to reports, is that shrinking ice could force us to institute a “military and homeland security presence” in the region.

Rica Madrid poses for a photograph as she rolls a joint in her home on the first day of legal possession of marijuana for recreational purposes, Thursday, Feb. 26, 2015, in Washington. Democratic Mayor Muriel Bowser defied threats from Congress by implementing a voter-approved initiative on Thursday, making the city the only place east of the Mississippi River where people can legally grow and share marijuana in private. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Tracking the trends

Why do we follow the news? To be informed, of course. We naturally want to be aware of what’s happening at home and around the world.

Illustration on the civil rights of the unborn by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How the abortion tide turns

Anew Facebook profile photo is beginning to spread on the Internet, especially among members of the rising millennial generation. It’s a picture of a baby within the womb. Superimposed on the baby is an equal sign.

Illustration of myths about the benefits of raising the capital gains tax by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Five myths about capital gains taxes

The late, great Jack Kemp, an architect of the Reagan tax cuts, used to say “without capital, capitalism is just another ism.” Capital is the plant, the machinery, the computers, and trucks that businesses invest in to become productive and efficient providers of goods and services.

Empowering individual workers rather than union bosses

This week, Sen Orrin Hatch, Utah Republican, and Rep. Tom Price, Georgia Republican, introduced a new proposal to rebalance the rights and the law regarding employees and union bosses. The Employee Rights Act (ERA) is a package of widely supported reforms that will stop workplace abuses of both union and non-union employees by big labor unions. The ERA gives individual employees the power to control their own money, personal information, and choice for legal representation in the workplace.

Illustration on arming airline pilots by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Restoring safety in airliner cockpits

Airline pilots have always been armed, except for a period from 1988 to 2002 when passivity in the face of violence somehow seemed logical. After the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, many wondered why pilots were ever disarmed. Congress passed the law that rearmed airline pilots with large, bipartisan, veto proof majorities in both houses of Congress. Rearming airline pilots has proven to be safe, very inexpensive and a highly effective deterrent to those who would use civilian airliners filled with innocent people as weapons of mass destruction.

Illustration on Union violence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Closing a union-violence loophole

On July 20, U.S. District Judge Michael Baylson sentenced Joseph Dougherty, the former boss of Philadelphia-based Local 401 of the Ironworkers union, to 19 years in prison for “overseeing a years-long campaign of sabotage, arson, and intimidation,” as Philadelphia Inquirer staff writer Jeremy Roebuck put it. Mr. Dougherty’s targets were nonunion construction employees and employers.

(Image courtesy of thestar.com).

Life’s a scream on the slippery slope

- The Washington Times

“The slippery slope” doesn’t frighten very many people in Washington because that’s where a lot of politicians live. Life can be comfortable there, and it’s usually quite profitable. But it’s a dangerous piece of real estate for the rest of us.

There’s good news about third-party candidates

The conventional wisdom is that an independent presidential bid by New York billionaire Donald Trump would harm the Republican candidate in 2016. That’s probably incorrect. Most often, significant independent general-election candidacies harm the incumbent or incumbent party more than they do the challenging party.

Related Articles

Illustration on courtesy, respect and rules in the U.S. Senate by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When tough talk roils the decorum of the Senate

The United States Senate has a long and justly celebrated tradition of comity and respect among members. Although there have been occasional exceptions throughout history, on the whole, senators have taken great care to treat each other with courtesy and respect, both in private discussions and in public deliberations.

Illustration on America's radical Islamist enemies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Defeating the mortal enemies

"The enemy has to be defeated," U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter last week told American forces stationed in the Middle East. That is a simple truth, one that, regrettably, is not heard often from officials in the current administration. Mr. Carter then added: "It will be, because the barbarians are always defeated by civilization." That is a comforting sentiment -- one that, regrettably, is not supported by historical evidence.

Regulator should understand the industry

Credit unions hold six percent of the business lending market. Credit-union business loans are made in the local community and are typically focused on small businesses, churches and real-estate rentals. The average credit union business loan is less than $225,000. During the financial crisis the highest loss rate was less tha one percent. Do these loans sound like the "risky large loans," as your editorial suggests ("End run by the credit unions," Web, July 26)?

Deal great for U.S.-hating Iran

President Obama and Secretary of State Kerry have put the United States and other countries in jeopardy by entering into an agreement with Iran which temporarily curbs Tehran's nuclear-armaments program. Either our leaders have been duped or they are naive (or both). Mr. Obama and Mr. Kerry are more concerned about their respective legacies than the security of the world.

Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson, a native of Detroit,  lays out his presidential platform Monday, May 4, 2015, at Detroit's Music Hall that he is running for president. I'm Ben Carson and I'm a candidate for president for the United States," Carson said, before declaring — incorrectly now — that "I'm not a politician." Carson will now visit Texas, where his mother is gravely ill, before flying to Iowa to campaign. (Regina H. Boone/Detroit Free Press via AP)

Ben Carson, Rand Paul among GOP luminaries attending rally against Planned Parenthood at US Capitol

- The Washington Times

Student-organized "Women Betrayed" rallies are numerous on Tuesday against Planned Parenthood following the release of three undercover videos offering evidence that the organization profited from the sale of aborted baby parts. Sixty events are planned in cities nationwide, according to Students for Life President Kristan Watkins. Some GOP heavyweights will attend the event in the nation's capital.

Amazon Watch an Ecuador advocate

Your July 15, 2015, article about Amazon Watch's ongoing campaign to hold Chevron accountable for its 18-billion-gallon toxic mess in Ecuador omits critical facts and propagates falsehoods ("Amazon Watch still backs Steven Donziger's discredited Chevron lawsuit after others bail," Web).

President should protect all life

President Obama, a strong gun-control advocate, is at it again. He takes to the airways to selectively use tragic gun killings to advance the cause of taking guns away from innocent, law-abiding gun owners ("Obama 'most frustrated' by inability to pass gun control,' Web, July 24) .

Pinocchio (Associated Press)

When the Big Lie becomes the legacy

- The Washington Times

Maybe the Christian thing to do is to cut John Kerry a little slack. He hit his head harder than the doctor thought when he fell off his bicycle in Switzerland.

With Obama, assume the worst

Why are veterans stunned and baffled by President Obama's late-night talk-show "rosy assessment" of VA reforms ("Obama touts VA progress, claims wait times reduced to 'just a few days,'" Web, July 21)?

Harry S. Truman

Where is a Democratic barn-burner?

If the Democrats want to be taken seriously, and something more than a party of self-righteous whiners, they must start acting like the party of Franklin D. Roosevelt, Harry S Truman and John F. Kennedy. All the fun shouldn't be left to the Republicans. Why should the nation be deprived of a contest for the Democratic nomination for president, the usual cat fight that always invigorated Democratic Party politics?

Tel Aviv has long sought the release of Jonathan Pollard, a former intelligence analyst convicted in 1987 of spying for Israel. He is serving a life sentence. (Associated Press)

Parole for Jonathan Pollard

Close relationships, whether human or nation-to-nation, are always complicated. Almost any Thanksgiving Day dinner table is a demonstration of that, with brothers and sisters and cousins and aunts stepping carefully to avoid spoiling the turkey and spilling the cranberries. So it is with nation-to-nation relationships, too. As close it is, no country-to-country relationship is more complicated than America's relationship with Israel.

Earth Igloo Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Promoting very unsettled science

If you have been to the beach at Treasure Island, Florida (adjoining St. Petersburg), you will notice something very odd. The hotels (many of which were built in the 1950s and '60s) and the seawall are very far from the water in the Gulf of Mexico — giving an extraordinarily wide beach. It was not always that way. When the hotels and seawall were built, they were set back from the high tide a normal hundred yards or so; but over the years, there was a natural but unforeseen accretion to the beach — which, having grown up in the area, I observed. (It can be seen on Google Earth.)

Illustration on the dominance of the U.N in the Obama/Iran nuclear arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fantasists, bumblers and Iran

First the Obama administration denied that any secret side deals were made when they negotiated the agreement that they insist us will prevent Iran from producing and deploying nuclear weapons. Secretary of State Kerry assured us that it was a "fantasy" to believe there could have been a better deal, and the president said the only alternative is war.

Presidential candidate Donald Trump    Illustration by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Let Trump be Trump

Politics -- and politicians in a democracy -- are a true reflection of society's virtues and faults at a given window in time.

Earth to Kepler-452b

NASA has discovered the answer to all of our problems. It is another planet, a possible twin to Earth that could theoretically sustain life.