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Julaine Appling, president of Wisconsin Family Action, right, and her organization's attorney Mike Dean, defenders of Wisconsin's state ban on gay marriage, talk to reporters after attending a hearing before the 7th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals on the challenges to Indiana and Wisconsin's gay marriage ban Tuesday, Aug. 26, 2014, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Europe stands strong for traditional definition of marriage

A court decision issued last month about homosexual marriage received almost no news coverage in the United States, yet the decision could have significant implications when the U.S. Supreme Court decides whether the Constitution requires same-sex marriage.

Hong Kong Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hong Kong’s miraculous progress

How did this small city-state of 7.3 million people go from having a per-capita income of only a few hundred dollars per year to a per-capita income that is equal to that of the United States in only 50 years?

Labor Day Americana Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Labor Day, a misnamed holiday

No American holiday is as unusual as Labor Day. As legal holidays go, Labor Day isn’t very old.

The Left Attacking the Tea Party Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The mainstreaming of liberalism

One of the curious aspects of the Tea Party’s emergence during the past four years is the extent to which the mainstream media have fostered the idea that this political phenomenon represents a kind of radicalism.

Country Civility Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The source of civility

Even in the silence of the timeless Great Smoky Mountains, it’s nearly impossible to get away from the world’s aches and pains — not to mention horrors. The only way to do it is to unplug completely.

Chinese Threat to IT Development Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The frightening emergence of government patent trolls

When the Chinese government announced in April it was establishing a government-controlled patent-operations fund in April, there were few people besides Asian trade analysts who gave the news much attention.

Education Priorities Illustration By Donna Grethen

Transforming labor with school choice

This Labor Day, many Americans will use the holiday to wind down the summer, cook out with friends, or get a long weekend away.

FILE - This Aug. 28, 2014 file photo shows President Barack Obama speaking in the James Brady Press Briefing Room of the White House in Washington, before convening a meeting with his national security team on the militant threat in Syria and Iraq. President Barack Obama’s acknowledgement the U.S. still lacks a strategy for defeating the growing extremist threat emanating from Syria reflects a still unformed international coalition. The president will meet with his top advisers and consult members of Congress to prepare U.S. military options. At the same time, he is looking for allies around the world to help the U.S. root out the Islamic State group that has seized large swaths of territory in Syria and Iraq.(AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Barack Obama, the king of climate change

President Obama clearly believes that the Supreme Court, in its 2007 decision, Mass. v. EPA, empowered the president, via the Environmental Protection Agency, to unlimited regulations of greenhouse gases without the advice or the consent of Congress.

Mitt Romney

Another look at a savvy loser

- The Washington Times

Mitt Romney would defeat Barack Obama if they were matched again today. One or two polls say so. But they’re not matched today and a poll like that is only for a friendly conversation over a cup of coffee.

Waiting for Godot Court Ruling Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Suing the feds gets old

There is a reason so many citizens who reach the Supreme Court of the United States in their battles with the federal government and emerge to face reporters and their cameras are elderly, white-haired widows. Fighting the world’s largest law firm is like “Waiting for Godot,” but worse. Samuel Beckett’s absurdist play was fiction, but the ludicrous lengths to which federal lawyers go to avoid Judgment Day is all too real. Stanley K. Mann of Colorado, now 82, spent 20 years awaiting that day.

Related Articles

Nixon Book

Ex-aide to John Dean trashes Watergate figure's book

According to John Dean's new book, "The Nixon Defense: What He Knew and When He Knew It," President Nixon knew a lot more about Watergate a lot sooner than he ever admitted. However, the question one should ask before plowing through Mr. Dean's 746-page "definitive" history is, "What difference, at this point, does it make?"

Banker Follows Graduates Illustration by William Brown

Digitizing the authentic education

Thousands of moms and dads, following the script written into an autumn ritual of the middle class, are preparing to say farewell to the sons and daughters they've loved, nurtured and tried to civilize for nearly two decades.

Burger King's "King" Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Chasing Burger King to Canada

Burger King's effort to acquire Tim Hortons, a Canadian purveyor of coffee and doughnuts, is a good business decision, but its choice to locate corporate headquarters north of the border would be the direct result of President Obama's anti-business tax policies.

Turkey Davutoglu Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Talking Turkey with an Islamist academician

As Recep Tayyip Erdogan ascends Thursday to the presidency of Turkey, his hand-picked successor, Ahmet Davutoglu, simultaneously assumes Mr. Erdogan's old job of prime minister.

FILE - In this June 18, 2014, file photo, Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen speaks during a news conference at the Federal Reserve in Washington. Economists agree with Yellen that the economy and job market still need ultra-low interest rates to support growth. Yet the latest Associated Press survey of economists shows that most also fear that the Fed will wait too long before raising rates, perhaps triggering high inflation or financial asset bubbles.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Economic numbers that hide the gloom

A bunch of economic numbers from the government this week, which should be taken with a large grain of salt, are expected to show the economy has been doing much better in the past three months.

Target Holder Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Holder's police-shooting hypocrisy

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. is enjoying a tidal wave of laudatory press coverage for his activism on the Ferguson, Mo., shooting and subsequent protests.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Good Hunting: An American Spymaster's Story'

When an expert such as Jack Devine, a three-decades-plus veteran of the CIA's Clandestine Service, warns about myriad world troubles stretching into the foreseeable future, serious citizens should take heed — and those now running the agency, both in-house and as elected officials, should give "Good Hunting" a careful read in light of what can be done to protect the country.