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Filtering WiFi at Coffee Shops Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Internet pornography pandemic

In her recent interview with Vanity Fair, actress Jennifer Lawrence addresses her emotions following the widely publicized hack of her and several other actresses’ iCloud accounts, in which privately taken nude photographs were posted on the Internet, saying, “It’s not a scandal; it is a sex crime.”

Illustration on Democrat race baiting by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Race-baiting down the homestretch

Desperate times call for desperate measures, and with the possibility of Republicans gaining control of the Senate in the upcoming midterm elections, the left is resorting to jaw-droppingly despicable race-baiting tactics.

Connecting the Dots to Despotism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Connecting the dots to despotism

Recently, I wrote a column suggesting that we are living in an age of insanity. Events since show the madness morphing into soft despotism, which may harden into outright tyranny.

Image: White House

Obama choreographed hug with Ebola victim

- The Washington Times

President Obama is usually “not interested in photo ops,” but apparently he made an exception for Friday’s good news that Nina Pham, the first Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola, is now virus-free.

Lonely Ebola Plane Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The cooty factor in the time of Ebola

At the end of the classic novel “Love in the Time of Cholera,” a ship remains at sea, with its star-crossed lovers keeping their secret as long as they don’t reach port.

In this Nov. 20, 2013, file photo, President Barack Obama awards former Washington Post executive editor Ben Bradlee with the Presidential Medal of Freedom during a ceremony in the East Room of the White House in Washington. Bradlee died Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014, according to The Washington Post. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, File)

Ben Bradlee and the end of a rowdy era

- The Washington Times

The obituaries for Ben Bradlee, who died this week age 93, invariably described him as “the legendary editor” of The Washington Post. That was careless language. Ben was not “legendary” at all. He was very real, as the Watergate defendants learned to their chagrin and sorrow.

Illustration on overgrown government by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Larger government means shrinking efficiency

According to Gallup, a mere 28 percent of the nation has a “great deal” or “fair amount” of trust in the legislative branch, while the executive fares only marginally better.

RG ENTERTAINMENT LTD.
Animated versions of President Obama and Ronald Reagan argue economic philosophy in "I Want Your Money."

Obama demonstrates Reagan’s point

President Obama is nearing the end of his sixth year in office, with his unpopular liberal agenda in ruins, his job approval polls at record lows, and his party facing sweeping losses in next month’s elections.

China-Taiwan Submarine Power Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Submarines, made in Taiwan

To meet its long-standing requirements for modern submarines to deter attack from China, Taiwan has decided to start an indigenous development and construction program, which the United States can and should support.

Douglas MacArthur      Associated Press photo

Things fall apart

What ever became of that America? What ever became of that can-do nation? What has happened to us?

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Health workers wear protective gears before entering the house of a person suspected to have died of Ebola virus in Port loko Community situated on the outskirts of Freetown, Sierra Leone, Tuesday, Oct. 21, 2014. After emerging months ago in eastern Sierra Leone, Ebola is now hitting the western edges of the country where the capital is located with dozens of people falling sick each day, the government said Tuesday. So many people are dying that removing bodies is reportedly a problem. (AP Photo/Michael Duff)

EDITORIAL: A respite from Ebola

The Ebola threat seems to have subsided, and that's cause for cautious relief. The operative word is "seems," but three weeks have passed since an unemployed Liberian man flew into the United States and infected two health care workers with the deadly virus.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

D.C. charter schools deserve equal funding

As Washington gets ready to select a new mayor, D.C. voters should insist that to get their vote, a candidate should pledge to provide all students in the District equitable treatment when it comes to school funding.

Twitter (Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire via AP Images)

Liberals more likely than conservatives to dump a friend over politics

- The Washington Times

Politics brings out certain petty behaviors in people, particularly those who frequent Facebook and Twitter. To like, or not to like, to friend — or horrors — unfriend? A retweet can be a personal matter, indeed. Politics and ideology play a pronounced role in the phenomenon, this according to an extensive survey and analysis of "political divisiveness" among Americans released Tuesday by the Pew Research Center. The study found that liberals are more likely to dump a friend than conservatives over partisan leanings alone.

Illustration on excessive government regulation of oil by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Opening the tap for crude-oil exports

Not many years ago, the idea of "peak oil" was all the rage. The concept, first identified in 1956 by M. King Hubbert, a geologist working for Shell Oil, held that there was a finite amount of oil in the ground and that oil production would peak in the 1970s and then decline.

Illustration on Ron Klain by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Treating Ebola with politics

When the then-spreading Ebola virus threatened our nation last week, President Obama put one man in charge of coordinating the government's response who had zero experience in handling infectious diseases.

Illustration on free trade and government restrictions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Free-trade superstitions

What's it like being a free-market advocate in the 21st century? I think it can be summarized as follows: Another day, another dollar — and another attack on capitalism.

Workers set up a giant advertisement for Apple's iPhone 6 which goes on sale in China, Friday, Oct 17 2014 in Beijing. China is one of Apple's largest and growing market where enthusiasts of the company's latest iPhone are willing to pay thousands of dollars to get their hands on the latest version. (AP Photo/Ng Han Guan)

EDITORIAL: Apple and Google restrain the snoops

Obama administration officials seem to think the Constitution gives the government a license to snoop on whomever it pleases, whenever it pleases. The founding document does no such thing, of course, but Congress cannot summon the courage to restrain the executive branch.

In this Sept. 30, 2014, file photo, Gordon Kamara, left, is sprayed by Konah Deno after they loaded six patients suspected to have been infected by the Ebola virus into their ambulance in the village of Freeman Reserve, about 30 miles north of Monrovia, Liberia. *AP Photo/Jerome Delay, File)

It's the Ebola incompetence, stupid

There are a few things in the world that we know for sure, including the existence of Ebola, what those infected go through, and the fact that, as of now, there is no cure or official universal treatment that mitigate its fatality rate said to be around 70 percent.

Senate candidate Bruce Braley, right,  campaigns with  U.S. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., in an Iowa Votes rally in Des Moines  Sunday, Oct. 19, 2014, at the Hotel Fort Des Moines . (AP Photo/The Des Moines Register, Rodney White)  MAGS OUT, TV OUT, NO SALES, MANDATORY CREDIT

It was a dark and stormy Democratic night

- The Washington Times

This is the week the political world, like the worm, begins to turn. The polls, the hunches, the guesses and the vibes that only junkies feel all say it's a Republican year and Harry Reid will soon take a seat on the back bench.

Seal of the Just Us Department Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A post-Holder Justice Department worthy of the name

Watergate-era misconduct and politicization at the Department of Justice shattered public trust in a once-venerated institution by 1975. The urgent task of restoring Justice fell to Edward H. Levi.

In this Oct. 1, 2014 photo, placards advocating a position to keep casino gambling in Massachusetts rest against a wall in the entrance to the Plainridge Racecourse harness racing track in Plainville, Mass. The Plainridge Park Casino is under construction adjacent to the harness racing track in Plainville. Voters will decide in the Nov. 4 election whether to repeal a 2011 law that opened the door for casinos in the state. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

Pew Research poll finds motivated conservatives twice as likely as liberals to vote on Nov. 4

- The Washington Times

Conservatives are twice as likely as their liberal counterparts to go to the polls Nov. 4. No really. "Although overall turnout among the public is likely to be around 40 percent, 73 percent of those who hold consistently conservative attitudes are likely to vote in the midterm, as are 52 percent of those with mostly conservative views," reports the Americans Trends Panel, a substantial new gauge of the upcoming midterm election by the indefatigable Pew Research Center.

A longtime Democratic operative, Ron Klain was tasked Friday by President Barack Obama with running the government's response to the Ebola crisis. (AP Photo/Revolution)

A new, unimproved Ebola czar

- The Washington Times

Liberian health care workers have threatened to strike unless they receive higher pay for working with Ebola patients.

Shortly before mailing his own ballot, U.S. Senator Mark Udall, D-Colo., speaks inside a coffee shop on a campaign stop to remind voters to mail in their ballots, in the Five Points area of Denver, Monday, Oct. 20, 2014. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

Showing proper ID is a fact of life

If you've ever tried to board a plane, cash a check or rent a car, you've almost surely had to show some form of identification with your picture on it. Millions of Americans produce them every day to do dozens of everyday tasks and think nothing of it.