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Immoral Illegal Drugs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why buying illegal drugs is immoral

Purchasing illegal drugs is an immoral act, regardless of where one stands in the legalization debate. When drugs are legally prohibited, criminal organizations assume control of production and distribution, making violence inherent in the process. Drug proceeds are used to fund criminal and terrorist organizations, enabling them to murder innocent people, attack police and military, bleed our tax dollars, and destroy the rule of law.

Illustration on gun control debate by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Challenging inaccurate information about guns

When you receive glowing media attention and have hundreds of millions of dollars to spend, you don’t really have to debate. Michael Bloomberg just announced last week that he would be putting $25 million into next year’s House and Senate races. From 2013 to 2016, he donated $48 million toward congressional races. By contrast, the NRA contributed a measly $2.1 million. And Mr. Bloomberg spent about 85 percent more on lobbying, more on television advertising, and much more for state and local political races.

Illustration on the Clinton campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How Hillary doomed her ‘inevitable presidency’

While we’re examining the accomplishments of Donald Trump’s first 100 days — putting his man on the U.S. Supreme Court is the biggie — Hillary Clinton is getting the once-over (and the second and third) for all the reasons why she’s not the first woman to preside over her own first 100 days in the Oval Office.

Illustration on the Trump White House decision to broaden media access by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Talking right

President Trump did something Monday I have long advocated. He met with a small group of conservative journalists, pundits and radio talk show hosts. I was among them.

This May 23, 2016, file photo, shows the northernmost boundary of the proposed Bears Ears region, along the Colorado River, in southeastern Utah. Western Democrats are pressuring President Donald Trump not to rescind land protections put in place by President Barack Obama, including Utah's Bears Ears National Monument. Obama infuriated Utah Republicans when he created the monument on 1.3 million acres of land that is sacred to Native Americans. (Francisco Kjolseth/The Salt Lake Tribune via AP, File)

Go, Trumpm go — pare back the national monuments

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump is taking aim at some of Barack Obama’s national monuments, as well as at designations made by other presidents. And this is great news. Terrific news. When it comes to the country’s national monuments, this White House’s attitude should be one of slash and burn — not conserve and preserve.

Illustration on the dangerous complications of the Obama/Iran nuke deal by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Tangled in Obama’s Iran nuclear trap

On April 18, the State Department certified Iran to be in compliance with its commitments under the Iran nuclear deal (Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action, or JCPOA). As France’s iconic foreign minister, the Marquis de Talleyrand, once reportedly said: “This was worse than a crime; it was a mistake.”

Illustration on the sources of Trump's ideas by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The anatomy of a Trump decision

When Donald Trump’s Florida lawyer Paul Rampell first proposed turning the future president’s Mar-a-Lago estate into a private club, Mr. Trump pronounced the idea “dumb.” Over the next month, Messrs. Rampell and Trump argued back and forth about the idea until Mr. Trump finally agreed with Mr. Rampell.

DAY 40 - In this Feb. 28, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump, flanked by Vice President Mike Pence and House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis., gestures on Capitol Hill in Washington, before his address to a joint session of Congress. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, file)

Ending the threats of a government shutdown

We are looking at another potential federal government shutdown this week. The high drama over passing a budget, passing spending bills under regular order, and the lifting of the debt ceiling has gone on for far too many years.

Illustration on a possible replay of 1927 for the Democrat party in 2020 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Will 2020 be another 1972 for Democrats?

The year 1968 was a tumultuous one that saw the assassinations of rival candidate Sen. Robert F. Kennedy and civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. Lyndon Johnson’s unpopular lame-duck Democratic administration imploded due to massive protests against the Vietnam War.

Democrats can’t chart their way forward in this wilderness

Like most minority parties that lose the White House, the Democratic Party is without a national leader. Their legislative caucuses in the House and Senate have elected leadership, but the party itself has several elected officials fighting to lead it into the future, all with an eye toward 2020. And the party’s most visible figures aren’t exactly fresh faces.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton gives an acceptance speech after accepting the Trailblazer Award during the LGBT Community Center Dinner at Cipriani Wall Street on Thursday, April 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Kevin Hagen) ** FILE **

The Democratic Party’s ‘Gong Show’

Finally, the Democrats admit it wasn’t the Russians, James B. Comey or sexism that brought Hillary Clinton down. We are now told by journalists, leading Democrats, and even a former Democratic presidential candidate, that it was the inept dysfunction of the party itself, Hillary, and her abused and frightened team that has reduced them all to irrelevant, vapid political busybodies.

Related Articles

In this Wednesday, May 18, 2016, photo, the Home Depot logo appears on a credit card reader at a Home Depot store in Bellingham, Mass. The Home Depot Inc. says in a new federal lawsuit that Visa and MasterCard are using security measures prone to fraud, putting it and other retailers at risk of hacking attacks by cyber thieves. Atlanta-based Home Depot says new payment cards with so-called "chip" technology, rolled out in the U.S. in recent years, remain less secure than cards used in Europe and elsewhere in the world. (AP Photo/Steven Senne)

A Trump supporter worth listening to

Like the old E.F. Hutton commercials, there are some people who, when talking, are worth stopping what you're doing and paying attention. Mr. Marcus, the co-founder of The Home Depot, which revolutionized the hardware store industry, is one of those people. His recent endorsement of President Trump's achievements during his first 100 days as president is worth considering and echoing.

FILE - In this March 22, 2017, file photo, Antonio Reyes of Brownsville, Texas, stands by the U.S.-Mexico border fence near his home. Reyes said he's seen people scale the border fence that bisects his backyard and jump down in seconds. Sometimes they carry bales of what appear to be drugs. A higher wall is "still not going to stop them," he said. "They'll shotput it or whatever they have to do." (AP Photo/Rodrigo Abd, File)

Protecting our southern border with U.S. mariners

As chairman of the Coast Guard and Maritime Subcommittee in the House of Representatives, I am proud to be an unwavering defender of the Jones Act -- a critical U.S. national security law that requires vessels moving from one U.S. port to another must be U.S.-built and U.S.-crewed.

Illustration on the consequences of questioning current conventional wisdom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shut up and go away

Columbia University, from which I have a degree, has set aside rooms where straight white males -- like me -- are told they are unwelcome. How should I respond to their annual fund drives?

Unrest in Venezuela Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Venezuela's coming civil war

- The Washington Times

As American public attention has been focusing on terror attacks in Paris, the crisis in Syria and the nuclear-armed lunatic running North Korea, Venezuela to our south is about to explode into violence and civil war with incalculable consequences in our own hemisphere.

Illustration on CUFI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A boost for U.S.-Israeli ties

"An unidentified guest uses a Trump Hotel branded umbrella as she walks into the West Wing of the White House," read the caption of an Associated Press photo in the Washington Examiner picturing an attractive young woman whose face is becoming increasingly familiar in Washington political circles.

A local resident holds a sign as he listens to Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speak at a rally for Omaha Democratic mayoral candidate Heath Mello, Thursday, April 20, 2017, in Omaha, Neb. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Riding the tiger

"He who rides a tiger is afraid to dismount," a Chinese proverb cautions the unwary. That's where the Democrats, flailing in a search for a way out of the wilderness, find themselves in their warm embrace of Trump Derangement Syndrome.

GOP, speak up on costs

The Republican Party is failing to articulate key facts, primarily financial, affecting proposed and operative major legislation. This is akin to a bank failing to inform a customer that a credit card has been maxed out.

FILE -- In this Jan. 16, 2017 file photo, Richard Ratcliffe, husband of imprisoned charity worker Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe, poses for the media during an Amnesty International led vigil outside the Iranian Embassy in London. The family of Zaghari-Ratcliffe who was detained in Iran while on a trip with her toddler daughter says all efforts to appeal her five-year prison sentence in court have failed. Ratcliffe, who works for the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the charitable arm of the news agency, found out this weekend that her appeal to Iran's supreme court failed. (AP Photo/Alastair Grant, File)

Addicted to uranium

When gentlemen compete, they honor the rules of the game and accept the referee's calls. But no one would mistake the rulers of the Islamic Republic of Iran for gentlemen, and their gamesmanship in pursuing nuclear weapons is deadly serious. As the mullahs make a bid for more uranium, They have been called out for cheating. The United States is obliged to withhold approval of a new supply of the radioactive material until the regime can prove it's not up to mischief. Anything else is simply tomfoolery.

No freedom on liberal campuses

"Wellesley students advocate hostility on campuses to silence conservative 'hate speech'" (Web, April 20) exposes the eerily Orwellian nature of the events unfolding in our institutions of "higher learning." At Wellesley College, the case is being made for using force and violence to stifle the free speech of those who "refuse to adapt their beliefs." In February, students rioted and set fires at the University of California, Berkeley, to prevent an appearance by conservative personality Milo Yiannopoulos.

Every president must have 'his own SOB'

Chris Whipple, a documentary filmmaker and award-winning TV producer, is a talented journalist who has interviewed all 17 living chiefs of staff as well as numerous people who served with them. His prose is clear, crisp and often evocative, and for the most part his observations ring true as he tracks the development of the office.

In this Saturday, Feb. 11, 2017, file photo, U.S. President Donald Trump, right, listens to Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe as they make statements about North Korea at Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File) ** FILE **

North Korea must be dealt with

- The Washington Times

North Korea, long a thorn in the side of America -- a thorn that sharpened considerably under the "strategic patience"-slash-do-nothing leadership of Barack Obama -- has seized a third American citizen. And the regime must be dealt an aggressive blow.

Constitutional Change in Turkey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What Turkey's referendum reveals

The outcome of the Turkish vote on constitutional changes, notwithstanding lingering allegations of fraud, represents further evidence of a crumbling global status quo.

Illustration on the true intent of the Muslim Brotherhood by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Earning its terrorist designation

In an April 11 Brookings Institution report titled "Is the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organization?" senior fellow Shadi Hamid states that the Trump administration's proposed designation of the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist group "could have significant consequences for the U.S., the Middle East, and the world."

Illustration on the Trump dollar by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Donald Trump's dollar

President Donald Trump's assertion this week that the "dollar is getting too strong" led to a sharp decline in the value of the greenback.

Catching Illegal Voters Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Protecting the right to vote

A jury of 10 women and two men in Tarrant County, Texas, found Rosa Ortega guilty of voting illegally and sentenced her to eight years in jail.