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Alexis de Tocqueville

Helping those who help themselves in Baton Rouge

- The Washington Times

America is a remarkable country, and sometimes it takes a disaster to remind us of how remarkable it is. The millions who indulge a little self-pity over having to choose between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton should look to Baton Rouge for another view.

Illustration on financing the rebuild of the U.S. military by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How to rebuild U.S. military might

In order to rebuild the U.S. military the next president is going to have to do the following things with the economy. The next administration must design a growth plan that will allow the U.S. economy to expand at a 3 percent to 6 percent rate per year. Only Donald Trump’s plan has the opportunity to do this. It can be accomplished by the following these important actions:

Illustration on the destructive effects of the $15 minimum wage by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More casualties in the Fight for $15

Wegmans grocery has “essentially” pulled out of a major planned expansion in Washington, D.C. It was reported last week that the decision factored in the city’s newly passed $15 minimum wage and other potential forthcoming labor mandates.

This Nov. 11, 2014, file photo shows the U.S. Capitol Building illuminated by the setting sun on the National Mall in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Breaking through the Washington gridlock

Elections in a democracy are by their nature unpredictable. However, it is as clear as day that whoever becomes the 45th president of the United States will be staring at a full plate of international crises, an economy that is growing slower than anticipated, and a generally dysfunctional and hostile relationship between Republicans and Democrats on and off Capitol Hill.

Illustration on Petraeus and a White House pardon by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

A pardon for Petraeus

Was something missing when, earlier this month, the White House announced that President Obama used his constitutional prerogative to put 214 convicts back on the street? Yes, we didn’t see a pardon for the person many Americans believe is the greatest general of his generation, David Petraeus.

Illustration on China as the chief supply source for heroin and methamphetamine pushed in the U.S. by Mexican drug cartels by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The China connection

The trail of poison that led to the death of rock star Prince and thousands of other Americans begins in China, which President Obama will visit on Sept. 2. According the State Department’s 2016 Narcotics Strategy Report, “China has become a hub for illicit drug consumption, drug and precursor chemical trafficking, and money laundering activities.”

Dwight D. Eisenhower, 34th president of the United States, had high favorability numbers throughout his time in office. (White house)

Not liking this Ike

You’d think a national monument honoring President Dwight Eisenhower would be a can’t-miss proposition. Unfortunately, the proposed design by architect Frank Gehry to honor the man who guided the Allies to victory in World War II is shaping up to be a failure.

U.S. Presidency for Sale Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The push proceeds toward oligarchy

Forget for a moment the pressing question of who is going to win this year’s presidential election. Think instead about a broader question emanating from this campaign year: Is American political power flowing inexorably to an entrenched oligarchy that is becoming increasingly impervious to popular sentiment?

Following the Reagan road

Donald Trump’s first quest for the presidency in a number of ways can be compared to the first foray into national politics of another revered Republican who similarly first was seeking the presidency: Ronald Reagan.

Rosa Luxemburg (Associated Press)

Black Lives Matter and the endless war against the Jews

- The Washington Times

The man who controls the language controls the conversation, as George Orwell rightly observed. The word that the left is trying, with a certain success, to appropriate now is “genocide.” Genocide is what Hitler set out to do, to exterminate Europe’s Jews (and who knows where his evil ambition would have gone from there).

Federal Mismanagement of the Peanut Industry Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Politicians and peanut pilfering

The history of federal peanut policy is the perfect antidote to anyone who still believes that Congress could competently manage a lemonade stand. Federal spending for peanut subsidies will rise eight-fold between last year and next year — reaching almost a billion dollars and approaching the total value of the peanut harvest. This debacle is only the latest pratfall in a long history of horrendous federal mismanagement.

Hillary at the helm

- The Washington Times

”At long last,” she thinks. “My time has come. They’re now all here, fighting for me.”

Texas Bullet Train Project Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How private enterprise drives the trains

Texans are turning the tables on how to pay for nationally critical infrastructure projects, leading the way with a high-speed train project that relies on the expertise of private entrepreneurs instead of government money.

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Gravesite of Main Stream Media Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The legacy media meltdown over Donald Trump

The meltdown of the American legacy media is now complete. Conservatives are sadly aware of the decline of The New York Times, the supposed "newspaper of record," as the benchmark for legacy media in general.

FILE - In this Aug. 16, 2016 file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in Philadelphia. More than half the people outside the government who met with Hillary Clinton while she was secretary of state gave money, either personally or through companies or groups, to the Clinton Foundation. It's an extraordinary proportion indicating her possible ethics challenges if elected president.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

Honest lives matter

Virtue doesn't sell like it used to, and one variety in particular has been put on the back shelf. Billy Joel wasn't kidding when he sang, "Honesty is such a lonely word." Honesty only matters where truth is valued, and in the noisy cacophony of the digital age it's often difficult to recognize the genuine article. But it's still important to try.

Clinton emails must be exposed

The 15,000 new Clinton emails are on top of the 30,000 she released, which in turn are on top of the 33,000 she reported (if you believe her) and willfully deleted ("FBI found nearly 15,000 new Clinton emails, review likely to take months," Web, Aug. 22).

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (Associated Press)

Virginia's McAuliffe is for losers

All the fuss about Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe trying to restore voting rights to felons who have served their sentences is just fuss, nothing more. To be sure, it appears at first glance that the chief executive of the Old Dominion is really concerned about civil rights for the downtrodden.

Terrorists Present in the U.S. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No plan to stop foreign-born terrorists

For decades, foreign-born Islamic terrorists have been exploiting our immigration system. Almost every type of immigration has been exploited by terrorists, from temporary legal immigration to illegal immigration to humanitarian immigration.

A student teacher in the second-grade classroom of teacher Susanne Diaz at Marcus Whitman Elementary School, goes over lessons with students, in Richland, Wash. (Ty Beaver/The Tri-City Herald via AP)

Saving the public schools

Teacher tenure sounds like a good idea, and maybe in the Republic of Utopia it would be. But in the real world it can invite abuse. A group of students and their parents, backed by several philanthropists in Silicon Valley, are challenging the California teacher tenure system.

Safety of Chromium-6 Levels in North Carolina Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Exaggerating chromium risks

Constant claims, counterclaims and accusations about coal ash contaminating surface and underground water are making North Carolinians feel like they're watching a fast-paced tennis match. Even people with chemistry degrees must feel bewildered by assertions that parts per million or billion of chromium-6 may cause cancer.

Growing the Movement with Hate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter's hypocritical anti-Semitism

In its new platform, Black Lives Matter (BLM) has, despite the total lack of relevance to its own agenda or interests, thrown whatever heft it has behind the anti-Semitic movement to Boycott, Divest, and Sanction (BDS) Israel. In doing so, it is inarguably contributing to the campaign to "other" the world's only Jewish state and, with it, the Jews themselves.

The Tactics of George Soros Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Soros smear effect

Washington is not an easy-going town. You come here to argue policy with the big boys -- you should expect some rough-and-tumble. But you also should expect clean fights -- no biting, no spitting, no hitting below the belt. Whatever else divides us, we all value free speech and edifying debate, right?

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump is attempting to woo black voters, but GOP campaign veterans say his efforts are too little, too late. (Associated Press)

The media make history

This week I am going to do something unusual. I am going to enter into a conversation with another columnist. Doing so was not so unusual a few decades back. Bill Buckley and James Jackson Kilpatrick did it when provoked and it was always interesting. Yet today a columnist is a godlike figure.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Underground Airlines'

''If you would write a great novel, choose a great subject," an old aphorism declares. If you would write a great "what-if," choose an unspeakable alternative to historical fact. Thus "Underground Airlines" presumes that the Civil War never happened and slavery survives in America now.

#NeverTrump = #DefinitelyHillary

The #NeverTrump movement should look to history to guide its rhetoric and voting behavior. In the 2012 presidential election, between three and five million Republicans abstained from voting, and their absence contributed to President Obama's victory.

Overheated concern about July's warmth

Mainstream media report that July was the "hottest" month since 1880 (or as CNN wrongly reported, "ever"). And future Julys will only become hotter.

Slippery DOJ slope

Although the police in Ferguson, Missouri, did nothing wrong in the Michael Brown shooting, they have been investigated by the FBI and will submit to monitoring by our less-than-pure Department of Justice. The same will happen in Baltimore and very likely in Milwaukee.

The climate blame began in earnest last week with former Vice President Al Gore, who described the deluge as an example of "one of the manifestations of climate change." Those remarks were followed by a rash of supportive articles. (Associated Press)

Al Gore's sugar daddy

The optimist sees the glass half full, the pessimist sees the glass half empty. George Soros sees the glass as the property of someone else so he knocks it over. By knocking it over he spills some of the dark secrets of his so-called Open Society Foundation, revealing how his vast fortune promotes misfortune in America.

Only Trump helping

Wildfires in California have destroyed 96 homes and displaced 80,000 people. Flooding in Louisiana has damaged 40,000 homes and 86,000 people have already applied for federal disaster aid. Meanwhile the soon-to-be former president is vacationing in Martha's Vineyard, partying and playing round after round of golf.