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FILE - In this July 9, 2015 file photo, a Wall Street sign is seen near the New York Stock Exchange in New York. U.S. stocks moved lower on the last day of the year as the market headed for a sluggish end to 2015. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Who is best to reform Wall Street?

In order to reform the financial industry, the next President needs to understand what the fixes should be or risk an overreaction that makes the excesses worse.

Arrogant Iranian Actions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iranian arrogance

Iran’s recent capture of two U.S. Navy 47-foot Riverine Command Boats (RCBs) that were on a routine transit from Kuwait to Bahrain on January 12 is another example of the arrogance and contempt Iran holds for America and our political leadership.

Illustration on deporting persons who have overstayed their visas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A fresh approach to the immigration conundrum

Our broken immigration system has been bad for the country and a source of political division for well over a decade. Some want a so-called “comprehensive” solution to the crisis, but the prospects for it actually happening (let alone being a solution) are not good amid our divisions. It’s time to rise above the existing gridlock and build a national consensus based on national security.

Illustration on the costs of green energy by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Unearthing an all-of-the-above energy approach

Last month in his final State of the Union Address, President Obama abandoned his belief in an “all-of-the-above” approach to energy policy — one that blends the use of emerging and established energy resources for the American people and the American economy.

Crisis in Civic Education Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

College ignorance and the threat to liberty

Media outlets around the country have reported that 10 percent of college graduates think Judith Sheindlin — better known as TV’s “Judge Judy” — is a member of the U.S. Supreme Court. Behind this embarrassing yet hilarious finding is the fact that there is a serious crisis in American higher education.

Illustration on the West's failure to take Muslim culture seriously by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Islamist wears Dolce & Gabbana

In the “culture” section of the venerable Atlantic magazine last month, there was a news item I wouldn’t want you to miss: “The Italian fashion house Dolce & Gabbana has just launched a line of hijabs (headscarves) and abayas (cloaks) in the label’s signature playful, theatrical aesthetic.”

Illustration on the need for a new U.S. military rifle by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama’s search for a ‘safe’ gun

Just after the Battle of Gettysburg, Christopher Spenser, inventor of a revolutionary repeating rifle, escorted Abraham Lincoln out to the East Lawn of the White House to do a bit of target shooting. Lincoln was so impressed that he ordered Gen. James Ripley, the Army’s chief of ordnance, to purchase tens of thousands of Spenser’s repeaters at once and issue them to soldiers.

Illustration on rape and Muslim cultural practices by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Arab rape game

Lobbing firecrackers into the crowd gathered in the square outside Cologne’s cathedral on New Year’s Eve, a thousand-strong violent flash mob of Middle Eastern and North African Muslim men then took their celebration to the next level, breaking into smaller groups and isolating German women to rob, grope, fondle and in two cases (so far), rape them.

President Barack Obama speaks at the Righteous Among the Nations Award Ceremony at the Israeli Embassy in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Obama’s Holocaust remembrance

Chutzpah is one of those Yiddish words that defy exact definition. Merriam Webster lists synonyms like “audacity,” “nerve,” “cheek” and “gall.”

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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves after speaking during a campaign stop on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016, in Gilbert, S.C. (AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt)

Now to the real show

Soon the voters in Iowa will get a little relief from the invasion of candidates, their handlers, and the tsunami of reporters, pundits and assorted wise men who have trudged through snow and ice to make sure that no burp of the body politic goes unheard or unremarked. Iowans will get their state back, and to relish once more the silence of the cornfields.

Migrant children Nor, Saleh and Hajaj Fatema from Syria sleep outside the Swedish Migration Board, in Marsta, Sweden. Interior Minister Anders Ygeman says Sweden could deport between 60,000 and 80,000 asylum-seekers in coming years. (Jessica Gow/TT News Agency via AP, File)

Scandinavia learns a hard lesson

The rewards of pride and piety have suddenly expired in Scandinavia. The northern democracies, accustomed to dispensing unwanted tutelage in sanctimony, have canceled their welcome for the wave of migrants from the Middle East and North Africa trying to break down the door to Europe.

Laws to Stop Coal Production Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

'Welcome Back Carter'

President Obama's plot to use the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to kill federal coal mining with a thousand paper cuts is not the first time he has used NEPA to try to end energy development. Disturbingly, his scheme is a throwback to President Carter and a decade-long moratorium that ended only when President Reagan took office. Meanwhile millions of Americans, vast regions and the nation's economy will suffer.

Illustration on the expanding TSA by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Refocusing the TSA

The new Transportation Security Administration (TSA) administrator is saying and doing a lot of smart things. Among them, he stopped the practice of randomly placing unknown air travelers into abridged screening, calling it an "untenable risk." Smart. He has refocused his agency on security after years of lax management and public pressure shifted its priority to traveler convenience.

The Value of One Life Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Martian family values

Holed up during the Blizzard of 2016, I was a grateful recipient of our DVD-collecting neighbor's brand new copy of the Matt Damon film "The Martian."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates'

As a scholarly truism holds, "every generation rewrites history to suit itself," the same might be said for every historian, and every news anchor who wants to be one. Brian Kilmeade of "Fox and Friends" (with ghostwriter Don Yaeger), gave us "George Washington's Secret Six" and now has penned another look at our Republic's early years through a lens ground to his own prescription.

Former President George H.W. Bush visited the CIA on Friday to mark the 40th anniversary of his swearing in as the Agency's director in 1976. (CIA)

George H.W. Bush pays a call on the CIA

- The Washington Times

The CIA had a noteworthy visitor Friday. Former President George H.W. Bush returned to the agency's headquarters just outside the nation's capital to mark the 40th anniversary of his swearing-in as Director of Central Intelligence, and almost to the day. "He is credited with restoring focus and boosting morale in the institution, and he remains one of the most beloved Directors in the agency's history," the CIA stated in a historic overview.

Islamic Relief provides needed aid

The picture of Islamic Relief Worldwide painted by Kyle Shideler in "Funding terrorists must end" (Web, Nov. 29) is riddled with inaccuracies. It undermines the good name of an organization trusted by governments, U.N. agencies and hundreds of thousands of donors to deliver life-saving aid around the world.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes a question from a member of the audience during a campaign event at the Knoxville School District Administration Office, Monday, Jan. 25, 2016, in Knoxville, Iowa. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

The election when nobody showed up

- The Washington Times

Why are the front-runners in both parties so unelectable? The frenzied and the frightened count the ways, without getting into the depth and breadth and height a body's soul can reach.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Unspeakable Things'

By definition you cannot speak about unspeakable things, so writing about them in a novel called "Unspeakable Things" presents significant problems. Author Kathleen Spivack solves these by letting some things get lost in the haze of time, while obscuring others behind the curtains and closed doors that are so common in this novel. Some scenes she merely sketches, but others appear in brilliant color: vivid, entertaining, and often quite frightening.

Illustration on new recognition of Drone pilots and remote control combat contributions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

'R' is for respect

Ever since David felled Goliath with a slingshot, militaries have sought to deal death from a distance. Whereas David's ingenuity earned him accolades, rank, and ultimately the throne, his successors in asymmetric warfare are often derided for their physical remove from the battlefield.

Illustration on supply, demand and costs in U. S. healthcare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why health insurance premiums are rising

We shouldn't be surprised that health insurance premiums continue to rise at record rates — by 15-20 percent for many employers and their employees in 2016 alone. Between private insurance, Medicare and Medicaid, the number of insured Americans has grown dramatically to nearly 90 percent of the population.

FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2015 file photo, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush, right, makes a point as Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas listens on during the Republican presidential debate in Las Vegas. Ted Cruz once proudly wore a belt buckle reading “President of the United States” borrowed from George H.W. Bush. He campaigned and worked for, and helped write a book lavishing praise on, that former president’s son, Dubya. And the endorsement of George P. Bush, the family’s latest rising political star, lent credibility to Cruz’s then little-known 2012 Senate campaign. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

How to fix the debates

Donald Trump has a knack for drawing attention to a problem, but rarely has a way to fix it. He has done that again, largely by accident, with his row with Fox News over the Republican debates.

In this Saturday, Jan. 16, 2016 photo, Taiwan's Democratic Progressive Party, DPP, presidential candidate Tsai Ing-wen raises her hand as she declares victory in the presidential election, in Taipei, Taiwan. (AP Photo/Wally Santana, FIle)

Good news from Taiwan

The Republic of China (Taiwan) has become an economic powerhouse, the fifth largest in Asia and in the top 20 in the world, and even more important, its political institutions are stable. Real growth has averaged about 8 percent over the past three decades. The older labor-intensive industries have steadily moved elsewhere, replaced by technology-intensive industries.

Republican presidential candidate Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, speaks during a campaign event at Heartland Acres Agribition Center, on Monday, Jan. 25, 2016, in Independence, Iowa. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

In America, faith matters

The presidential candidates have been talking about God lately, which is understandable because most of them haven't a prayer of being elected.

Our Moral Compass on Syria Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Say it's not so

Is this the United States of America that continuously defers to Russia and Iran, and thereby to the Syria of Bashar al Assad? Do our own actions and words enable one of the most murderous and cruel, destructive and destabilizing, regimes the world has ever seen? Have we so lost our strategic sense and moral compass that we knowingly repeat policies that have made war and atrocities in Syria worse?

Syrians struggle to get pillows and blankets distributed at a camp for displaced civilians, in the village of Atmeh, Syria. Other Syrians have escaped the conflict by going to neighboring countries, taxing the ability of those nations and international relief agencies to help them. "In terms of the overall numbers, it is very clear the region is facing a humanitarian disaster that is deepening by the day," said Sharon Waxman, of the International Rescue Committee's Commission on Syrian Refugees. (Associated Press)

Islamic Relief: A humanitarian organization dedicated to saving lives

Over the past twenty years, Muslim organizations have played an increasingly prominent role in the delivery of international humanitarian aid. Their growth has been underpinned by the striking generosity of growing Muslim communities in North America and Europe and by zakat - the religious obligation to give 2.5% of disposable income to charity.