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Illustration on the fall of Yemen by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Yemen’s collapse demonstrates Obama’s foreign policy failures

Last Tuesday night, President Obama assured the American people that their nation is secure because of his leadership. His “steady, persistent resolve,” Mr. Obama proclaimed in his State of the Union speech, has resulted in a “safer, more prosperous world.”

Illustration on corrupt reprisals from the IRS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Payback from the IRS

The Internal Revenue Service’s woes did not begin or end with Lois Lerner and the agency’s targeting of political opponents with punitive action. Earlier this month we became painfully aware (again) that political games and punishing the taxpayer appear to be the burgeoning raison d’etre of the tax-collecting agency.

Illustration on the illusory nature of the economic recovery for the middle class by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s illusory economic recovery

The big news from this week’s State of the Union address is that the economic “crisis is over.” Apparently, we’ve been rescued from a second Great Depression and everything this president has done to fix the economy has worked. All that was missing from Mr. Obama’s celebration was the old “Icky Shuffle” end zone dance.

A woman waves a Greek flag during a speech by the leader of Syriza left-wing party Alexis Tsipras outside Athens University Headquarters, Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015. A triumphant Alexis Tsipras told Greeks that his radical left Syriza party's win in Sunday's early general election meant an end to austerity and humiliation and that the country's regular and often fraught debt inspections were a thing of the past. "Today the Greek people have made history. Hope has made history," Tsipras said in his victory speech at a conference hall in central Athens. (AP Photo/Fotis Plegas G.)

Now Greeks should dump the Euro

Since 2008, the Greek economy has shrunk by 25 percent, and the stock market is down more than 80 percent.

Illustration on school choice by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The steady progress of school choice

Sunday marked the start of National School Choice Week, an annual celebration of education reforms that give parents the power to pick the schools, public or private, that are best for their children.

Obama, General of the Free Army Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Free Stuff Army

Fresh from offering “free” health care, “free” phones and “free” food to the masses, he’s upped the bribery to “free” community college tuition and “free” child care. It’s not that the Clintons oppose any of these; they just need to affect moderation in case Hillary runs for president and has to knock back boilermakers again with the good old boys in Pennsylvania taverns.

President Barack Obama eats shave ice with daughter Malia at Island Snow, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015, in Kailua, in Hawaii during the Obama family vacation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Obama lives in ignorance of Islamic threat

- The Washington Times

President Obama has a happy and untroubled life on Fantasy Island, where he lives in splendid isolation from the world where the rest of us live. He is never troubled by terrorists, whether Islamic, Jewish or Episcopalian. All rough places have been made plain, manna falls right on time every morning, the water is pure, clear and cold, and golf courses where everybody breaks par stretch to a happy oblivion. The ants never get into his pants.

Illustration on success and college degrees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scott Walker’s real-life diploma

Without a college degree you can go on to create a computer empire like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, build an airline company like Jet Blue, found an organic food company like Whole Foods, or just become a run-of-the-mill tech nerd and create WordPress, DropBox, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Spotify, Threadless or Pinterest. But some say you can’t be president of the United States.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The war on school choice in Milwaukee

Milwaukee public schools are doing their best to block the expansion of school choice in the city—and the kids are the ones suffering.

Global Isolation of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Using boycotts to delegitimize Israel

Symbols count. For many, what they want to believe determines what they consider true. Needless to say, many in the Middle East do not want to believe in Israel’s existence. As a consequence, Harper Collins one of the world’s largest publishing houses, sold English language atlases to schools in the Middle East that omit the state of Israel.

Skilled computer hackers love Cyber Monday, and sneaky business spikes on this day. (Denver Post via Associated Press)

Getting serious about cybersecurity

The Sony attack, courtesy of North Korean-sponsored cyberterrorists, was one of the biggest media stories to end 2014. Salacious information pulled from private emails was leaked to the press, who dutifully reported the embarrassing details of individuals’ private correspondence, not to mention various trade secrets, business plans and valuable intellectual property.

Illustration on the rate of black babies being aborted in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Aborting black America

“Black lives matter” has become the slogan of anti-police protests across the nation, but the target of the protests is so misplaced that the motives of the so-called civil rights leaders behind the movement must be questioned. Do they really care about black lives? Or are they cynically exploiting isolated incidents, such as the death of Michael Brown, to inflame the black population and advance their own political interests?

An anonymous art installation showing a broken pencil is displayed on the pavement near the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015. Terror attacks by French Islamic extremists should force the country to look inward at its "ethnic apartheid," the prime minister said Tuesday as four men faced preliminary charges on suspicion of links to one of the gunmen. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Say no to walking on eggshells

People of the civilized world must say no to walking on eggshells around radical Islam and beyond.

Related Articles

Illustration on pro-life millennial voters by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The abortion intensity gap

In 2008 and 2012, the Democrats trampled over Republicans when it came to mobilizing and recruiting the younger generation. In 2008, Barack Obama beat John McCain among 18- to 34-year-olds by 34 points; in 2012, Mitt Romney lost by 23 points to President Obama in the same age group. It was a trouncing by any standard.

A downfall advanced by bad jewelry

It was a 2,800 carat diamond necklace that many people thought was ugly and it may be that Queen Marie Antoinette never either wore it or saw it, but it made a bitterly ironic contribution to the collapse of her world and her consequent death.

The EPA’s command-and-control climate science

After hearing Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy speak at this month's annual meeting of the American Meteorological Society in Phoenix, Arizona, I realized that the United States is truly in a world of trouble from too much pollution — not the "carbon" kind, but the ideological kind.

President Barack Obama waves before giving his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The state of the president

The Constitution requires presidents to provide Congress with periodic information on the "state of the union" and President George Washington delivered the required information in a speech to a joint session of Congress in 1790. That turned out to be an unfortunate precedent. Most of his successors haven't been able to resist making it an occasion for a speech, either.

Give single mothers college chance

Peter Morici's language about single mothers in the op-ed about President Obama's proposal for free community college is problematic ("Obama's bogus community college giveaway," Web, Jan. 14). Mr. Morici creates a vision of the impoverished single mother who lacks confidence, suffers emotional distress, lacks reading and math literacy and is waiting in the wings to enter and disrupt institutions of higher education. He resorts to fear mongering to falsely warn of this "risky" type of student in effort to dissuade the public's approval of Obama's plan.

The rich pay more than their fair share

Punitive overtaxation on the most productive, and excessive redistribution, shuts down long term economic growth and the American Dream.

Turkey's Cyprus incursion nothing new

Guy Taylor's "Newsmaker Interview" with Turkish Cypriot negotiator Ergun Olgun ("Cypriot union threatened by dispute over oil and gas rights," Web, Jan. 11) is a public relations ploy by Turkey to lure the public away from Turkey's latest violation of international law: its 'gunboat diplomacy' in the eastern Mediterranean and incursion into Cyprus' Economic Exclusive Zone (EEZ).

Illustration on the need for sanctions against Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The case for deadline-triggered sanctions

Experienced negotiators know this: The side most willing to walk away from the table generally wins. The side that seems desperate for a deal loses. Yet President Obama is telling the entire world that he needs an agreement with Iran's rulers more than they need an agreement with him.

Community Outreach through Athletics Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Choosing the challenging road to reconciliation

A few days ago I had the pleasure of sitting down with Edward Mullins, president of the Sergeants Benevolent Association of the New York Police Department, to discuss potential ways of improving community-police relationships. He has been working with outstanding community leaders like Pastor A.R. Bernard, and they sincerely want to achieve a highly successful outcome to a problem of trust that has spread throughout the nation.

Illustration on accusations of racism against the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

Al Sharpton vs. Hollywood

Last week, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences unveiled its 2015 Oscar nominations. Popular movies, including "The Imitation Game," "Boyhood" and "The Theory of Everything," received some positive recognition. Other films, including "The LEGO Movie" and my personal favorite, "Mr. Turner," received lesser nominations or were snubbed in certain categories.

Gary Becker

The lions of liberty

People are a bit more free and prosperous as a result of the work of Gary Becker, John Blundell, Leonard Liggio, Gordon Tullock and Henry Manne, all of whom passed away during the last eight months.

This Nov. 13, 2014, file photo shows the U.S. Capitol Dome, in Washington, surrounded by scaffolding for a long-term repair project, and framed by the last of autumn's colorful leaves. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Dull but important D.C.

A story line that's often under covered: Washington is getting lots of things done and will do so throughout 2015.

A Belgian soldier patrols in front of EU headquarters in Brussels on Monday, Jan. 19, 2015. Security has been stepped up after thirteen people were detained in Belgium in an anti-terror sweep following a firefight in Verviers, in which two suspected terrorists were killed. (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo)

Possibly up to 1,000 Islamists in Belgium

Sources close to French and Belgian intelligence services say there could be up to 1,000 Islamist "sleepers" currently hiding in Belgium and waiting for the right moment to strike.

No halo for Holder on forfeiture fix

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. announced on Friday that the Justice Department would cease sharing confiscated private property with state and local police agencies under its Equitable Sharing program. Asset forfeiture has recently been widely denounced by both liberals and conservatives as an civil liberties atrocity that has victimized innocent Americans across the nation. A Washington Post report suggested that the policy change was part of Mr. Holder's efforts "to burnish his place in history."

We're making it needlessly difficult for Americans to save and invest. That hurts job growth and depresses wages.



(Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

The shared benefits of tax reform

Lawmakers in Washington have plenty of work ahead of them this year, so the temptation to punt on everything but the "hot" issues will be strong. Here's one they should tackle without hesitation: tax reform.

Critic suggests White House cancel State of the Union address - too 'big, noisy, overhyped'

- The Washington Times

"Are we ready for a big, noisy, overhyped prime-time production that has outgrown its simple origins and usually leaves us feeling both gorged and disappointed? If not, you may want to skip the State of the Union address and prepare for something humbler, like the Super Bowl," says Steve Chapman, a Chicago Tribune columnist, who notes that President Obama has already revealed much of his speech to the nation. "Cancel the State of the Union," says Mr. Chapman.

Illustration on excessive government surveillance and national security by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Terror undeterred by mass surveillance

The failure of the massive surveillance state established by liberal western governments is becoming more and more apparent. One such failure was accidentally confirmed by both Sen. Dianne Feinstein and House Speaker John Boehner in just the last week.

Nigel Farage leader of Britain's UK Independence Party (UKIP) celebrates as he hears the results of the south east region European Parliamentary Election vote at the Guildhall in Southampton, England, Monday, May 26, 2014. From Portugal to Finland, voters of 21 nations cast ballots Sunday to decide the makeup of the next European Parliament and help determine the European Union’s future leaders and course. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

In defense of Europe's so-called far right

Rather than engage in name-calling and attempts at exclusion, established institutions should encourage the populist parties to moderate, become more sophisticated, and fully participate in the political process.