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Illustration on examining voter fraud by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rooting out vote fraud

Judging by the unhinged reaction this past week to the first public meeting of President Trump’s blue-ribbon voter fraud panel, progressives are terrified.

Iranian Intentions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Certifiably wrong about Iran’s compliance

During President Trump’s campaign he said that Mr. Obama’s 2015 nuclear weapons deal with Iran was the “worst deal ever.” Although there are many diplomatic deals vying for that title, the deal engineered by Mr. Obama is at least one of the worst ever for two reasons.

How to fix the Obamacare fiasco

It’s no grand revelation that Republicans have bungled the Obamacare repeal bill beyond belief. Sen. Mitch McConnell wants a Senate vote on full repeal of Obamacare with two years to come up with a replacement. This would be the ideal solution, but it appears he lacks the necessary 50 votes for passage.

In this Feb. 28, 2017, photo, an F-15C Eagle from the California Air National Guard, 144th Fighter Wing, flies out of the nicknamed Star Wars Canyon over Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Restoring the military’s moral underpinnings

The Trump administration came to power with a clear mandate to restore U.S. military credibility, effectiveness, and capabilities. Such a mandate involves reversing not only the debilitating impact of sequestration on our declining military force structure, but also the Obama administration’s social engineering mandates forced on our military.

Misdirected Canadian Money Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Time

The travesty of rewarding a terrorist

In July 2002, Omar Khadr was accused of throwing a hand grenade and killing a U.S. Army combat medic, Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Speer, on the battlefields of Afghanistan. Khadr was ultimately captured, linked to al Qaeda (reportedly through his father’s connections), pled guilty, and sat in a Guantanamo Bay jail cell before being repatriated by Canada in 2012.

Robert Mueller. (Associated Press)

The swamp strikes back

- The Washington Times

A lot of snakes and scorpions live with the alligators in the swamp, and there are even more dangerous monsters there. No swamp creature is deadlier than a Washington lawyer.

Illustration on the border wall and security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond the good news of the wall

Based upon President Trump’s promise to secure the U.S. Border with Mexico, illegal immigration plummeted during the first half of 2017. In the first three months of his presidency, illegal border crossings fell by nearly 75 percent from that of the previous year and represented a historic low in the modern history of the Border Patrol. What President Trump accomplished is nothing short of a miracle, but he can’t continue to do it alone. Border security is not the sole responsibility of the White House; it’s also the responsibility of Congress.

Turkey and NATO Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

NATO alliance helping dictators

President Trump found NATO wanting. Then true to form, he acted like a CEO, not a president, serving notice that things had to change, or else. The “or else” he left undefined, creating angst among politicians and policy elites who, sensing their own failures, chose to focus on his manners not his message. Mr. Trump’s poor political decorum notwithstanding, his policy judgment is right. NATO has to change.

Amazon Busts Through the Bricks and Mortar Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Embracing disruption and reinvention

In every age, civilizations embrace technologies that disrupt the status quo. Amazon and its internet brethren may be menacing to brick and mortar establishments but only because they make our lives richer and easier — and there is nothing new about engineers and entrepreneurs doing that.

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump greets workers during a visit to the Carrier Corp. factory in Indianapolis. More than 300 Carrier Corp. workers were being laid off Thursday, July 20, 2017, from the company's Indianapolis factory as part of an outsourcing of jobs to Mexico that drew criticism last year from then-presidential candidate Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

The benefit of putting health care aside

“It ain’t over till it’s over,” Yogi Berra said in his famous aphorism about losing. And that may eventually apply to the Republicans’ failed attempt to “repeal and replace” President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare.

President Donald Trump listens during a "Made in America," roundtable event in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, July 19, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump facing most hostile press coverage in history

Over and over again, I, and many others, have stated that President Donald Trump has received the most hostile press coverage of any sitting president in U.S. history. Democrats laughed and claimed that former President Barack Obama was treated worse, but the facts don’t lie.

Illustration contrasting Trump supporters and opponents by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The great American divide

You could call it the tale of two election reflections, two competing points of view, two American perceptions of out-of-focus reality. Two important liberal voices “looked back” this week at the November election to try to figure out how and why Donald Trump, whom “everybody” despised and “nobody” wanted to win, actually did.

Illustration on government overspending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Porking out with your money

Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to eliminate governmental waste and fraud, just released its “2017 Congressional Pig Book,” an annual publication highlighting wasteful government spending that should embarrass each and every member of Congress.

The Capitol in Washington is quiet after lawmakers departed the for the Independence Day recess, Friday, June 30, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

Republicans, thy name is mud

- The Washington Times

Republicans, as a party, are reeling at their most recent failure — an epic one — regarding repeal-replace Obamacare. Stumbling seems to be Republicans’ new mode of transportation. What’s insanely angering about it is they’re stumbling over their own roadblocks.

Related Articles

Left Wing University Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When institutions drift left

I have recently been reminded of one of my earliest conclusions about the American left. I arrived at that conclusion when what we now call the left was relatively civilized. We called it, in those days, American liberalism, but even then it was fla fla.

Onwards with the Iranian Resistance: Regime change within reach (cover, July 18, 2017)

Compliant but dangerous Iran

Last Friday marked the second anniversary of an agreement on the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), better known as the Iran nuclear deal. I was a critic of the deal at the time, and I continue to be alarmed by Iran's aggression on the world stage.

'Banned in China'

The lot of a censor in China is not always a happy one. Not for lack of trying, Beijing's suppression of published opposition to its one-party Marxist rule is in trouble.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Kentucky Republican, said the parliamentarian's guidance is not a ruling. (Associated Press/File)

Republicans flee the health care fight

If the Republicans in the U.S. Senate were a baseball team, they would be the 1962 New York Mets. The Mets won only 40 games that summer, losing 120, the most inept performance since 1899 when a team called the Cleveland Spiders also won only 40 games. As the Mets stumbled to the end of the disastrous season, their manager, Casey Stengel, cried out in desperate frustration: "Can't anybody here play this game?"

Trump won. Get over it.

Nary a moment goes by without a breathless tale of "collusion" by President Trump and the Russians. Did the Russians "spike" our water supply or alter vote totals to cause the election of Donald Trump? Grassy knolls notwithstanding, how was the nefarious deed achieved?

Return government to the people

We the American voters must work together if we are to see some of our more serious problems resolved. Those we have sent to Washington will not work together in our interest, so we must work together in our own interest. With an ever-growing debt of $20 trillion, we know spending is out of control. Yet our representatives just want to raise the debt limit. Before another budget is passed, we need a balanced budget law.

"Why aren't the same standards placed on the Democrats. Look what Hillary Clinton may have gotten away with. Disgraceful!" President Trump tweeted Wednesday. (Associated Press/File)

America hates Hillary -- and digs Trump

Nearly every day, another mainstream media poll emerges that claims President Trump has the lowest approval rating since Caligula. But there's one person Americans like even less: Hillary Clinton.

Former Vice President Al Gore made the claim Monday that President Trump is "deliberately" making decisions that hurt America's standing on the global stage. (NBC)

Al Gore's frowny face: 'I was wrong' on Trump

- The Washington Times

Al "Hanging Chad-Man' Gore, former failed presidential candidate and former -- equally as failed, some would say -- vice president, has come crawling out of his air conditioned mansion to pick up his climate change manual once again and chide President Donald Trump on national television. His beef? It's hot -- damn hot.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions addresses the summer meeting of the nation's district attorneys from around the country at the Hilton in Minneapolis, Minn., Monday, July, 17 2017. Sessions said the Justice Department will soon make it easier for local law enforcement to seize cash and property from crime suspects and reap the proceeds. (Jerry Holt/Star Tribune via AP)

White House dead wrong on asset forfeitures

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump may be doing a lot of good for America, particularly in terms of putting the nation first on the international stage and its citizens, not special interests, first in the domestic arena. But on asset forfeiture laws, this White House is wrong. Dead wrong, completely wrong, egregiously wrong.

Un-American court demands Rowan County quit praying

- The Washington Times

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit ruled 10-5 that Rowan County, North Carolina, commissioners couldn't open their government sessions with prayer. What a travesty for America, the country English writer and philosopher Gilbert Keith "G.K." Chesterton once referred to as "the only nation in the world that is founded on a creed," a creed that "clearly names the Creator as the ultimate authority.'

Harry S Truman. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

What to do with the narcissist's children

- The Washington Times

Pity the poor presidents. It's not enough for presidents to deal with enemies foreign and domestic, conduct warfare with Congress and dispense lollipops. Sometimes they have to deal with "help" from sons, daughters, brothers, in-laws and other hangers-on to the bully furniture at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

China Steel Dumping Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Putting American steelworkers first

As President Trump returns from his first G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, we are reminded that some countries do not want to see America grow stronger and be a beacon for freedom around the globe. During his historic inauguration speech while speaking about the decline of American industry, Mr. Trump made clear that "this American carnage stops right here and stops right now." It's clear that the carnage that has taken place in U.S. industries such as steel and aluminum needs to come to an end. As Mr. Trump has said repeatedly, we need to "buy American and hire American."

Illustration on Trump's direct communication with the American people through his Twitter messages by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

President Trump's tweets

I admit, I'm a real fan of President Trump's tweets. It's an uncensored, uninhibited and direct way for him to react and communicate "his take" on daily events. Even though his lawyers may cringe and wish he wouldn't tweet, it has changed -- forever -- the "natural order of things" in Washington D.C., a city forever in love with itself.

Illustration on the fallacious 1992 report claiming a 19 percent minimum wage increase in New Jersey raised the rate of fast food employment in that state by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When minimum wage surveys are flawed and misleading

It was "fake news" before anyone was familiar with the term: The claim that a 19 percent minimum wage increase in New Jersey in 1992 caused an increase in fast food employment compared to neighboring Pennsylvania.

Voters Registered in Perpetuity Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Tracing the range of voter fraud

The media came unhinged over President Trump's Advisory Commission on Voter Integrity. CNN falsely claimed that 44 states had stonewalled requests for voter data, when only 14 had done so. Media outlets screamed "voter intimidation!" Their fury suggests that Mr. Trump is onto something really big.