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Illustration on the ideology behind Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A bloody day in London town

“The Kafir’s Blood Is Halal For You, So Shed it.” That’s just one of the catchier headlines in a recent issue of Rumiyah, a slick online magazine published by the Islamic State, also known as ISIS and ISIL.

Podesta Russian Ties Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats’ dalliance with hypocrisy

- The Washington Times

Washington and the national media are all about double standards. It should come as no surprise to anyone that the sort of Russian “ties” used to condemn Republicans as possible agents of Moscow are dismissed as irrelevant when Democrats are revealed to have deeper, stronger and far more remunerative connections to Russian banks, oligarchs and institutions than any Republican currently being banished to the outer darkness by Democratic “progressives.”

Illustration on Liberal attitudes toward the Judiciary branch by Alexandewr Hunter/The Washington Times

Higher than the high court

The trials of Judge Neil M. Gorsuch, before the Senate Judiciary Committee en route almost certainly to his place on the Supreme Court, reveal one of my favorite findings regarding modern politics, to wit: The Democrats are the extremists, the Republicans are mainstream. The Democrats are the ideologues; the Republicans base their policies and political judgments usually on philosophy.

Illustration on the dangers of "dawa," Islamist indoctrination by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Confronting political Islam

It is important for the United States to tackle radical Islamist ideological indoctrination — dawa — before it takes root to the extent it has in Europe.

Davey Crockett Donation to Fire Victims Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The false compassion of liberalism

Last week on CNN I debated a liberal commentator who complained that the problem with the Trump budget blueprint is that it lacks “compassion” for the poor, children and the disabled. This woman went on to ask me how I could defend a budget that would cut Meals on Wheels, after-school programs, and special-ed funding, because without the federal dollars, these vital services would go away.

Illustration on the negatives of the Paris climate accords by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward a better climate sans Paris

It’s time for the United States to pull out of the Paris climate agreement entirely. On Tuesday, President Trump signed an executive order that promoted American energy security by rolling back several overreaching Obama-era regulations that are central to the Paris climate pact.

In this March 21, 2017, file photo, Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch smiles on Capitol Hill in Washington, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Neil Gorsuch, the scholar and the man

To hear others speak of 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge and Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, it is as if the phrase “scholar and gentleman” were coined to describe him.

Tax Reform for Economic Growth Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Thinking clearly about tax reform

President Trump has said he is going to move on to tax reform after the debacle with Obamacare repeal. Is there any reason that we can expect greater success with the tax reform effort? I argue no, unless the rules in the House and Senate are modified, and those in Congress, whose brains are connected enough to distinguish between tax rates and tax revenues, take control.

President Donald Trump arrives to sign various bills in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Monday, March 27, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Less personality, more policy

In the aftermath of the debacle over the Republican effort to repeal and replace Obamacare, President Trump can learn a valuable lesson that will serve him well in the next battle over tax reform and other issues.

This Thursday, May 12, 2016, file photo, shows a sign outside a restroom at 21c Museum Hotel in Durham, N.C. The Associated Press has determined that North Carolina's law limiting LGBT protections will cost the state more than $3 billion in lost business over a dozen years. That's despite Republican assurances that the "bathroom bill" isn't hurting the economy. (AP Photo/Gerry Broome, File)

Transgenderism’s friendly neighborhood media

- The Washington Times

The Associated Press came out with a cost estimate of how North Carolina’s so-dubbed “bathroom bill” — you know, the one that makes clear that boys must stay in their own restrooms, and girls, likewise — is going to cost the state $3.76 billion over the next dozen or years. What the estimate is based on is the hope and prayer that nobody asks questions. Because under scrutiny, the numbers pretty much crumble.

Illustration on the situation of the Korean peninsula by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Possibilities for reunifying the Korean Peninsula

With North Korea threatening its sixth nuclear test, and the pace of its ballistic-missile tests quickening, Pyongyang’s global threat is ever more imminent. Twenty-five years of self-defeating American efforts to negotiate with the world’s only hereditary Communist dictatorship have, not surprisingly, proven fruitless.

Illustration on Ross Perot's fiscal warnings    The Washington Times

The sagacity of Ross Perot

Exhibit A is the national debt, which reached $20 trillion this year — or $164,000 for every income taxpayer in the country. Because politicians don’t have a plan to address this issue that satisfies most of their constituency, they operate as if it doesn’t exist.

Obamacare Repeal Failure Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Botching the Obamacare repeal

As of last week, House Speaker Paul Ryan’s crumbling halfway house — known officially as the American Health Care Act — definitively collapsed.

Related Articles

Working Together to Stop Nuclear Terror Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The growing threat of nuclear terrorism

The greatest challenge to global security is the nuclear threat from rogue states, led by North Korea and Iran. There will be no progress in ensuring global nuclear stability without cooperation between the United States and Russia. This should be a major priority for Presidents Trump and Putin. Much has been made of states trying to secure their borders against terrorist threats. While it is essential that borders are secured, terrorism is tackled and hatred confronted, we cannot ignore the greatest contemporary threat of all, nuclear attacks. It feels remote and unlikely, but is a very clear and present danger.

Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

- The Washington Times

Neil Gorsuch took the best shots, such as they were, of disheartened, dismayed and despondent Democrats this week, and nobody laid a glove on him. He was as fresh when it was over as when the slugging, such as it was, began.

Refugee Comparison Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Promoting unrestricted immigration with a false equivalent

President Trump has issued a modified version of his previous immigration policy executive order that was stalled six weeks ago by a federal judge in the state of Washington. Mr. Trump has been under relentless attack from those on the left against his efforts to limit immigration from terrorist-producing areas and his call for comprehensive vetting and background checks. Beyond doubt, it is the first and most important duty of a president to protect the lives of a country's citizens, especially where a possibility exists of terrorists being embedded within a particular immigration flow. As the president previously stated, to not strictly enforce our immigration laws is "not compassion but recklessness."

Giving Shakespeare novel treatment

Jeanette Winterson's scintillating, clever "The Gap of Time" ($15, 273 pages) is the first of the novels commissioned by the Hogarth Press in honor of the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare's death, each of which takes one of the Bard's plays and rewrites it as a novel.

President Donald Trump jokes as he sits in the drivers seat of an 18-wheeler as he meets with truckers and CEOs regarding healthcare on the South Lawn of the White House, Thursday, March 23, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

It's always Trump's fault

The mainstream media pile-on of the Department of Homeland Security for its directive banning laptops, tablets and other electronic devices on direct flights from cities in eight predominately Muslim countries to the United States follows a familiar pattern.

Plastic cups spell out Rockville Strong, at Rockville High School in Rockville, Maryland, on Thursday, March 23, 2017. The school has been thrust into the national immigration debate after a 14-year-old student said she was raped in a bathroom, allegedly by two classmates, including one who authorities said came to the U.S. illegally from Central America. (AP Photo/Brian Witte)

Reading, writing, and raping

Rape was once a capital crime almost everywhere. But the politically correct culture, with its gift for dumbing down everything, regards rape now not as a felony, but a misdemeanor, something like shoplifting.

School choice will unlock potential

Just as it would be impossible to sell a cake containing all the wrong ingredients, it's not possible to sell a school-choice scheme that is as far removed from school choice as East is from West. Not only does school choice not have to cost one dime, but it will save countless billions for hardworking taxpayers and provide every child the opportunity for a quality education that meets their needs, talents and faith. This will result in fewer dropouts, less crime, fewer gangs and less need for welfare, government health-care, abortions and prisons. It will surely usher in a new era of liberty, justice, prosperity and domestic tranquility.

Turkey must leave Cyprus

Like an overbearing parent, Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu prescribes how Cypriots must obey Turkey in order to have a future ("Turkey's vision for Cyprus," Web, March 19). Yet the progress made in the negotiations between Turkey and Cyprus is a result of the leaders of the Cypriot communities taking ownership of the negotiation process and painstakingly defining their own common vision for the future, one in which they share the duties of running a country.

Illustration on the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

When politicians judge jurists

I have spent this past week watching the Senate Judiciary Committee interrogating U.S. Circuit Judge Neil Gorsuch. Judge Gorsuch is President Trump's nominee to fill the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Military Buildup House of Cards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dangers of loose talk about winning wars

On several occasions, President Trump has exclaimed that America would start "winning" its wars again. Although these seemingly sensible announcements had a pleasing resonance among the many, it overlooked the obligations of serious strategic analysis.

Illustration on the Class of '21 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Class of '21, in hot pursuit of their Brave New World

The college Class of '21 is racing with caught breath and trembling fingers to check their email, pick up their snail mail, and steel themselves to read those college acceptance and rejection letters. Many schools have already dispatched congrats and regrets to thousands of applicants, and the Ivies still have a week to go before they put their letters in the mail.

Henry Sanchez, 18, is one of the students charged with rape. (Associated Press)

Maryland's 'safe' environment

A rough translation of Maryland's state motto is "Strong Deeds, Gentle Words." In the case of a 14-year-old girl who was recently raped and sodomized in a restroom at Rockville High School by two males students, both immigrants, one facing a deportation hearing, that motto in practice has been reversed.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Democrats' blinkered look at Gorsuch

There was a remarkable exchange between Sen. Dianne Feinstein, ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Trump's nominee to replace Justice Scalia on the Supreme Court, during Tuesday's confirmation hearing.

Illegal Voter Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

From Free State to sanctuary state

- The Washington Times

Maryland is quite a place. The state's voters elected a Republican governor in 2014, but control remains in the hands of the same "progressives" who enjoy veto-proof majorities in both houses of the legislature on most issues. They vote as if former Gov. and presidential wannabe Martin O'Malley is still ruling the roost in Annapolis.