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Saving the nation from the left’s bullies

As we’ve all been understandably focused on Hollywood’s Weinstein dumpster fire, a number of stories have emerged exposing the left’s continuing culture war, despite its meltdown in the film industry.

Illustration on salvaging the U.S./Iran nuclear agreement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s third way

President Trump made a tough call last week. European diplomats and an “echo chamber” in the mainstream media were insisting he “recertify” the nuclear weapons deal his predecessor concluded with Iran’s rulers in 2015.

The Clinton Protection Racquet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary and Harvey’s shared fate

I have been fascinated by Harvey Weinstein’s initial response to charges that the Bathrobed Romeo sexually molested women. His statement was at once otherworldly and yet weirdly similar to Hillary Clinton’s eventual response to the scandal. I say “eventual response” because it took her over a week to comment. Obviously, Hillary’s lawyers and public relations magicians had to word her response very carefully.

Illustration on the failure to "contain" Russia by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How America has failed to contain Russia

Seventy years ago, George Kennan’s “Sources of Soviet Conduct” set the course for U.S. containment policy toward the Soviet Union. Following the Soviet Union’s collapse and a decade of economic turmoil which resulted in reduced Russian regional as well as global influence, President Vladimir Putin began implementing a national security strategy to resurrect Russia’s great power status. He wanted Russia to be perceived as equal in stature to the United States and to ensure western ideals of freedom, liberty, and democracy would not threaten his regime security.

Teaching the Birds and Bees at School Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How federally funded sex education sexualizes schoolchildren

Upon returning to middle school from an orthodontist appointment to tighten his braces, 12-year-old Johnny struggles through a pre-algebra lecture then schlepps off to his health class where he is instructed in anal sex, oral sex, masturbation and sexual fantasy.

William Dodd Jr. speaks on the radio during debate within the United States on whether to enter World War II. International News Service photo.

How Russians meddled in the 1938 election

Did Russia meddle in the 2016 presidential election? President Donald Trump emphatically says “no.” But the hierarchy of the U. S. intelligence community is equally firm in saying “yes.” With three probes in progress — two by Congress, another by an independent counsel — an answer perhaps will eventually be found.

Stop the Shooters Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Stopping the high-rise shooter

Like most Americans, I have watched hours of TV coverage of the massacre at Las Vegas. The question that is constantly recurring in the commentaries is the wrong one: what was his motive?

Foreign Minister Sebastian Kurz, head of Austrian People's Party, smiles in Vienna, Austria, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017, after the closing of the polling stations for the Austrian national elections. (AP Photo/Matthias Schrader) ** FILE **

An Austrian thumb in the eye of the elites

- The Washington Times

The elites everywhere are having a hard time. When the peasants no longer salute, tug a forelock and obey with a whimper, even if with a snarl and a whine, you know you’ve lost your mojo.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Oct. 17, 2017.

Schooling the U.S. on economic freedom

Once again, there is more evidence that economic freedom leads to success. Many of the former communist countries of Central and Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union have made enormous economic progress from the time they became free almost three decades ago.

Pope Francis acknowledges the applause of the audience after he delivered his speech during the visit to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) on the occasion of the World Food Day, Monday, Oct. 16, 2017.(AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

Pope Francis, biblically challenged, blames climate change — again

- The Washington Times

Once again, Pope Francis has pressed forward the mantra that much of the world’s problems — hunger, overrun borders — are due to man’s failures to stop wars and address climate change. This is odd, given a more biblical perspective might say, oh let’s see, wars come from evil desires and hunger, in large part, from wars.

Illustration on Richard Nixon's role in the Vietnam War by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A faulty retelling of ‘The Vietnam War’

When Richard Nixon was in the White House, I was in Vietnam and he was my commander in chief. When I was on Ronald Reagan’s National Security Council staff, I had the opportunity to brief former President Nixon on numerous occasions and came to admire his analysis of current events, insights on world affairs and compassion for our troops. His preparation for any meeting or discussion was exhaustive. His thirst for information was unquenchable and his tolerance for fools was nonexistent.

Illustration on China's designs on the electric car market by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The race for electric vehicle dominance

General Motors and Ford are scurrying to realign for what many believe are the next big things — driverless and electric vehicles (EVs) — but don’t look to Detroit, Japan or Germany for the mighty impulse that transforms personal transportation. With the world’s largest car market and savvy government policies, the advantage goes to China.

Illustration on NATO' difficult situation with member nation Turkey by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saving NATO from Turkey

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization, known as NATO, faces an existential problem.

Vice President Mike Pence speaks on behalf of Virginia Republican gubernatorial candidate Ed Gillespie during a campaign rally at the Washington County Fairgrounds Saturday, Oct. 14, 2017, in Abingdon, Va. Establishment figure Gillespie is in a neck-and-neck race against Democratic Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam. (Andre Teague/The Bristol Herald-Courier via AP)

Trump heads, Pence tails

If a metaphor could be used for this White House, it might be a two-sided coin with President Trump as heads and Vice President Mike Pence as tails.

Related Articles

Illustration on the necessary nationalism of America and India by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why global leaders are putting their countries first

To anyone who listened to President Trump's speech before the U.N. General Assembly in September one thing should have been abundantly clear: The president wasn't there for anyone else's interests but America's.

Illustration on Nigerian terrorism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Thwarting terrorism in Nigeria

"If they fail to give us Biafra, Somalia will look like a paradise compared to what will happen to that 'zoo' (Nigeria)." These are the words of Nnamdi Kanu, leader of the so-called Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB).

Illustration on trump's destructive attitude toward Republicans by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

President Trump's stalled agenda

This has been a rough week or two for President Trump. Most job approval polls are plunging, his secretary of State called him a "moron," and the Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman says his behavior could put the U.S. "on the path to World War III."

Cyrus Vance, Jr.

A Weinstein verdict to suit the Red Queen

- The Washington Times

Sometimes the lynch mob gets the guilty party, but that's not the way to run a railroad. We have laws, after all, even if some of them are subject to change. But due process is permanent.

Efrain Diaz Figueroa talks to volunteers from "Caritas" at the remains of the house of his sister destroyed by Hurricane Maria in San Juan, Puerto Rico, Monday, Oct. 9, 2017. Figueroa, who was visiting for a month at her sister Eneida's house when the Hurricane Maria hit the area, also lost her home in the Arroyo community. He waits for a relative to come from Boston and take him to Boston. He says that he is 70 years old and all his life working can't continue in these conditions in Puerto Rico. (AP Photo/Ramon Espinosa)

Exploiting aid to Puerto Rico

Puerto Rico is a mess. But it was a mess before Hurricane Maria swept through with new misery three weeks ago. Electricity is still at a premium. By one estimate, electric power has been restored to only 10 percent of the island's customers.

Figuring Out Paddock Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The making of the Las Vegas murderer

It's been a long week since the largest mass shooting on American soil, which shocked a nation battered by natural disasters. As the FBI searches the killer's house a second time, we have a picture of how the attack took place, the meticulous planning and the heroism of first responders and everyday Americans. What remains a mystery is why? What caused a 64-year-old retired accountant of comfortable means to abandon the high life of a professional gambler and slaughter 58 innocent people?

Gubernatorial candidate Ralph Northam is part of the new trend for Virginia Democrats, who have found that their path to victory runs through the growing suburbs of Washington and Richmond, and the Tidewater area. (Associated Press/File)

The Democratic dilemma in Virginia

The race for governor of Virginia looked like a slam dunk for the Democrats only a fortnight or so ago, and now it doesn't. Lt. Gov. Ralph Northam, the Democrat, is still the betting favorite (for people who do that sort of thing), but his double-digit lead in the public-opinion polls has been cut in half.

Millions of dollars in 'oppression'

What does "systemic oppression" look like in 2017? Apparently, a lot like $14.2 million, or the approximate worth of 49ers' safety Eric Reid's contract over the past five years. Where do I line up for such hardship?

Let Taiwan into UNFCCC

The 23rd session of the Conference of Parties (COP23) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), which will take place next month in Bonn, Germany, is capturing worldwide attention. COP23 is the latest in the series of Conference of Parties meetings that are signatory to the Kyoto Protocol, an international treaty through which member states commit to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions.

Mysteries among books and their rare abodes

"Bibliomysteries," a bibliomystery collection edited by Otto Penzler is a rare prize, and if you can wrench yourself away from the Caxton library, you can find the strangest story of all in the account of how pronghorn antelope were taken from Wyoming to Berlin

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly began by saying, "Although I read it all the time, pretty consistently, I'm not quitting today." (Associated Press)

The general schools doltish press corps

- The Washington Times

Gen. John Kelly stepped to the podium in the White House briefing room and delivered a bare-bottom, wire-brush, red-rash public spanking of the political press Thursday-- the likes of which we have never seen in the age of modern media. Except, perhaps, every single time President Trump addresses the media or hurls fiery bolts of Twitter lightning in their general direction.

Boy Scouts of America leaders say they will start developing the next generation of female leaders and allow families to participate in outdoor activities together. (Associated Press/File)

Boy Scouts are for boys, not girls

- The Washington Times

The Boy Scouts of America just announced it was going to allow girls to take part in its scouting program -- to earn the group's highest leadership rank, the Eagle Scout. This is a mistake. Boy Scouts should stay all boy; similarly, the Girl Scouts should stay all girl.

In this June 5, 2017, file photo, former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks in Baltimore. Clinton says she's "shocked and appalled" by the revelations of sexual abuse and harassment being leveled at Harvey Weinstein. She says in a written statement on Oct. 10, that the behavior being reported by women "cannot be tolerated." (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky, File)

Hillary Clinton, 'appalled' by Harvey Weinstein, still hedges on money

- The Washington Times

Well, finally and at last, and about freaking time. Hillary Clinton came out on CNN on Wednesday to say she was "sick" and "shocked" and "appalled" over the whole Harvey Weinstein sexual harassment-slash-rape allegations floating about the media. But her vow to return Weinstein dollars? Well now, we'll see. Her words suggestion something else.

Then-Attorney General Eric Holder speaks at the Justice Department in Washington, in this March 4, 2015, photo. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster) ** FILE **

NFL kneelers -- all hail the Eric Holder

- The Washington Times

What an interesting connection between one leading voice in the pro-anthem kneeling movement, NFL Players Association executive director DeMaurice Smith, and former attorney general, Eric Holder. The former actually worked for the latter. Figures.

In this Nov. 14, 2013, file photo, producer Harvey Weinstein attends the New York premiere of "Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom" in New York. Weinstein faces multiple allegations of sexual abuse and harassment from some of the biggest names in Hollywood. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)

Harvey Weinstein's late accusers

Hillary Clinton: Woods walker, Chardonnay drinker, screamer-into-pillows, sore loser. And now? The recycled claim of Feminist Icon Supporter of All Women. The feminist bar is very low these days.