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While early voting may seem more convenient, it actually decreases turnout. (Associated Press/File)

Early voting disadvantages seem to outweigh benefits

Early voting — opening a limited number of locations where people can cast their ballots prior to Election Day — is a “reform” that states should reconsider. Its disadvantages seem to outweigh its benefits.

Illustration on pro-active measures for protecting American cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia’s aggressive cyberwar

Russian President Vladimir Putin’s regime has been highly aggressive in pursuing cyberwar and cyberespionage at least since its 2007 attacks on the Estonian government. The fact that it is routinely attacking U.S. defense and intelligence cyber-networks can be no surprise.

Illustration on the history leading up the North Korean nuclear crisis by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How we got to a nuclear North Korea

President Trump and his Cabinet have said repeatedly that the present state of affairs with North Korea represents 25 years of American foreign policy failure going back over at least three presidents — Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Reviewing this disaster, there are at least three major mileposts.

American Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A better deal with NAFTA 2.0

America’s trade negotiators are now in the process of crafting a 2.0 update of the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Fortunately, it now appears that Donald Trump’s intention on NAFTA is to mend it, not end it. The trade deal has been a stunning economic success for all three nations: Canada, Mexico and the United States. Freer trade has meant steady increases in the volume of trade, greater competitiveness and lower prices.

Pope Francis, left, asperges incense in front of an icon of Mary and baby Jesus as he celebrates a canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

A step toward ending injustice in abortion

Human liberty and dignity notched a big win earlier this month. The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act is a landmark step adding further protections for the unborn by criminalizing abortions performed after 20 weeks into a pregnancy.

Cyrus Vance, Jr.

A Weinstein verdict to suit the Red Queen

- The Washington Times

Sometimes the lynch mob gets the guilty party, but that’s not the way to run a railroad. We have laws, after all, even if some of them are subject to change. But due process is permanent.

Illustration on Nigerian terrorism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Thwarting terrorism in Nigeria

“If they fail to give us Biafra, Somalia will look like a paradise compared to what will happen to that ‘zoo’ (Nigeria).” These are the words of Nnamdi Kanu, leader of the so-called Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB).

Illustration on the necessary nationalism of America and India by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why global leaders are putting their countries first

To anyone who listened to President Trump’s speech before the U.N. General Assembly in September one thing should have been abundantly clear: The president wasn’t there for anyone else’s interests but America’s.

Figuring Out Paddock Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The making of the Las Vegas murderer

It’s been a long week since the largest mass shooting on American soil, which shocked a nation battered by natural disasters. As the FBI searches the killer’s house a second time, we have a picture of how the attack took place, the meticulous planning and the heroism of first responders and everyday Americans. What remains a mystery is why? What caused a 64-year-old retired accountant of comfortable means to abandon the high life of a professional gambler and slaughter 58 innocent people?

Illustration on trump's destructive attitude toward Republicans by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

President Trump’s stalled agenda

This has been a rough week or two for President Trump. Most job approval polls are plunging, his secretary of State called him a “moron,” and the Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman says his behavior could put the U.S. “on the path to World War III.”

White House Chief of Staff John Kelly began by saying, "Although I read it all the time, pretty consistently, I'm not quitting today." (Associated Press)

The general schools doltish press corps

- The Washington Times

Gen. John Kelly stepped to the podium in the White House briefing room and delivered a bare-bottom, wire-brush, red-rash public spanking of the political press Thursday— the likes of which we have never seen in the age of modern media. Except, perhaps, every single time President Trump addresses the media or hurls fiery bolts of Twitter lightning in their general direction.

In this Nov. 14, 2013, file photo, producer Harvey Weinstein attends the New York premiere of "Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom" in New York. Weinstein faces multiple allegations of sexual abuse and harassment from some of the biggest names in Hollywood. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)

Harvey Weinstein’s late accusers

Hillary Clinton: Woods walker, Chardonnay drinker, screamer-into-pillows, sore loser. And now? The recycled claim of Feminist Icon Supporter of All Women. The feminist bar is very low these days.

Illustrationon the lecherous culture of Hollywood by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A great movie but a lousy life

What is it about these pathetic men with a paunch who imagine their looks and libidos are immortal, and think their excuse for manliness continues to attract sweet young flesh? You might ask some of the women.

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Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a keynote conversation at the 2017 Fortune Most Powerful Women Summit at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)

Hell on the (Canadian) border

Canada is experiencing a sharp surge of illegal aliens, and they're not just a few angry Hillary voters making good on their bluster about moving north if Donald Trump won the election.

A man is detained by Border Patrol officials after breaching border fencing separating San Diego from Tijuana, Mexico, Tuesday, Sept. 26, 2017, in San Diego. The man, who said he was from Chiapas, Mexico, was detained by agents as they prepared for a news conference to announce that contractors have begun building eight prototypes of President Donald Trump's proposed border wall with Mexico. (AP Photo/Gregory Bull)

Stalling the wall

There's something that doesn't love a wall, wrote the poet Robert Frost, and that something for the moment is comprised of Democrats. President Trump's long-promised wall along the U.S. border with Mexico is slowly rising from the desert floor and his noisy political opponents are mounting a campaign to bring it down.

Illustration on religious tolerance in Bahrain by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Dispelling ignorance, the enemy of peace

In the Kingdom of Bahrain, for centuries we have grown up with neighbors of all faiths, all cultures and all ethnicities, so we are happy and comfortable living in a multicultural, multifaith society, and we recognize this diversity as a natural and normal way of life for us in Bahrain.

Illustration on the future of Europe by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

We'll always have Paris

Europeans seem to have an increasingly bizarre and perhaps self-destructive view of the world, and their place in it. Last week's most creative illustration: The Irish postal service issued a stamp to "commemorate" the 50th anniversary of the death of "Argentinian Marxist revolutionary Che Guevara."

Alternate Canadian Flag Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Holocaust denial in Canada

Last week, Canada became the most recent industrialized country to officially commemorate the Holocaust by dedicating its first National Holocaust Monument in Ottawa. However, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau's unveiling of the monument also unveiled the glaring omission of any mention of Jews, anti-Semitism or the 6 million Jews who were murdered in the genocide.

President Donald Trump, left, and Secretary of State Rex Tillerson, right, walk out together to speak to members of the media following their meeting at Trump National Golf Club in Bedminster, N.J., Friday, Aug. 11, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Saving public lands for working Americans

This past weekend, a little-known holiday was celebrated. National Public Lands Day, which was created in 1994, serves to "connect people to public lands in their community, inspire environmental stewardship, and encourage use of public lands for education, recreation, and general health." While National Public Lands Day may be an obscure holiday, the issue of the future of public lands is a critical one and one being hotly debated across the country today.

Tax Reaper Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why tax cuts will be a tough sell

President Trump's team has proposed tax relief for ordinary Americans and businesses that would boost growth and create jobs. Unfortunately, the recent stock market surge indicates expectations may exceed the gains tax savings could actually provide.

Illustration emphasizing U.S./ Azerbaijani cooperation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Trump must engage Azerbaijan

As President Trump and his foreign policy team focus on the challenges posed by North Korea's reckless nuclear ambition, Russia's increasing belligerent stance, China's patient but determined quest for hegemony in Asia, and a resurgent Taliban in Afghanistan, we should not ignore one of America's most steadfast and reliable allies: Azerbaijan.

Susan Melton is comforted by James Warren Melton as she takes her seat before her son Sonny Melton's funeral at Big Sandy High School, Tuesday, Oct. 10, 2017,  in Big Sandy, Tenn. Melton, a registered nurse, died protecting his wife during the Las Vegas shooting massacre.  (Morgan Timms /The Jackson Sun via AP)

Revering life after Las Vegas

In the aftermath of the most deadly massacre in American history a friend asks: "Why would God allow a man to wreak so much carnage?" And the enormous violence clearly weakened my friend's belief in God. It should not have weakened his belief in God. Who else or what other agent is around to take the place of the Uncaused Cause?

The Tarnished Image of Harvey Weinstein Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hollywood's dishonest campus rape panic

For all of its flaws and fabrications, "The Hunting Ground," Harvey Weinstein's activist documentary film about sexual assault on college campuses, finally succeeded in helping to actually identify a real predator -- the filmmaker himself.

Securing Taiwan, saving America

Forget Graham Allison's oversold volume on the so-called Thucydides Trap. If you want to read one essential China policy book this year that offers some hope that your children need not be condemned to a century of wars with China, then read "The Chinese Invasion Threat" by Ian Easton, a research fellow with the Project 2049 Institute.

Pull the plug on the NFL

One thing black folks have in common with the NFL is the billions of dollars we represent in sports marketing. We must learn to use our collective influences to affect change where there is racial injustice and disparity in our communities.

President Trump spent much time before his election criticizing former President Barack Obama for spending what he said was too much time away from the White House on golf courses, and using taxpayer moneys to fund such excursions. However, once in office, Mr. Trump has made many similar golf outings. (Associated Press photographs)

Trump plays golf, shoots 73. Haters go crazy.

Kim Jong-il, the late supreme leader of North Korea, was one heckuva golfer. He only played once, in 1994, and he reportedly shot a 38-under-par round on the country's only golf course, including 11 holes-in-one (although some reports say he only had five). That's right: Par was 72; he shot a 34. His worst score all round long was a birdie.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson looks on as President Donald Trump speaks at a luncheon with South Korean President Moon Jae-in and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe, at the Palace Hotel during the United Nations General Assembly, Thursday, Sept. 21, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump, Tillerson -- WTFreak

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump, reportedly stung when his secretary of state, Rex Tillerson, was said to have called him a "moron," struck back -- as the president is wont to do -- and snarked in a just-released Forbes article that of the two, it's his own presidential self who's actually the smarter.

Swap football for patriotic rugby

I want to thank Vice President Pence for walking out on the NFL and their overpaid traitors. I'm also grateful for President Donald Trump and his game-changing leadership of America-first values, processes, improvements and benefits. It was the Soros-Clinton-Democratic-National-Committee operatives who approached the NFL Players' Union in the first place — and ultimately Colin Kaepernick and his copy-cat resistors — are solely responsible for this mess.