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(Associated Press) ** FILE **

The land of the cheerful giver

The Lord loveth a cheerful giver, as the Apostle Paul tells us, and some of the most generous givers are the most cheerful among the faithful, and they live among us in America.

Scimitar canary illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Islamic jihad comes to campus

The world is witnessing a resurgence of global anti-Semitism not seen since the 1930s and the “Final Solution.” In the Middle East, Hitler-admiring regimes like Iran, and Hitler-admiring parties like Hezbollah, Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood, are openly planning to finish the job the Nazis started. Even in America, until now the most hospitable place outside of Israel for Jews, the atmosphere is more hostile than at any time in the last 70 years.

Illustration on the history of successful presidents passing a "third term" to their political successors by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The odds against a presidential three-peat

Republicans looking ahead to 2016 take heart: History is on your side. For more than a century, only twice has a party held the White House for at least three consecutive presidential elections. Both times, it took each party’s greatest president of this period — Franklin Roosevelt and Ronald Reagan — to accomplished the feat. That fact should be a major concern to Democrats, who will be seeking their party’s third consecutive term on President Obama’s record.

Union attempts to organize fast food illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The $50 million question

Facing what appears to be terminal decline, the Service Employees International Union has taken to a desperate Hail Mary play to keep their bank accounts well-funded. This week SEIU and its “worker center” front groups, led by Berlin Rosen — a political consultancy with ties to New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio and other left-wing groups — staged various media stunts claiming to be “strikes” against fast food restaurants for higher wages.

Protecting the U.S. electrical grid illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Putting America in the dark

The recent temporary blackout in Washington that afflicted the White House, the Congress and interrupted a State Department press conference rightly provoked a spate of media commentary about the vulnerability of the electric grid to terrorist attack. The blackout reportedly was caused by a small explosion resulting from a malfunction in a transformer substation.

Illustration on the packaging of Hillary Clinton's candidacy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The selling of the new Hillary

Joe McGinnis, a young writer who got access to the advertising agency with the Nixon account in 1968, changed the way we thought about electing presidents with his best-seller, “The Selling of the President.”

Illustration on restoring the American dream by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The exceptional thing the successful GOP candidate must say

The successful Republican candidate for president will have to be many things: fearless fighter, relentless advocate for conservative principles, articulate spokesperson for the forgotten middle class, a likable charismatic personality, expert on the complicated dynamics of foreign policy and national security strategy.

Ethnicity mask illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The transracial nation

Not long ago, The New York Times uncovered the artifact that Republican presidential candidate Jeb Bush had once listed himself as “Hispanic” on a Florida voter registration form.

Illustration on Obama's killing of Americans without due process by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Can the president kill Americans?

Can the president kill you? The short answer is: yes, but not legally. Yet, President Obama has established a secret process that involves officials from the departments of Justice and Defense, the CIA, and the White House senior staff whereby candidates are proposed for execution, and the collective wisdom of the officials then recommends execution to the president, who then accepts or rejects the recommendation.

Republicans breaking campaign promises illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The wimpy GOP Congress

Last November, Americans sent a stern message to President Obama and the Democrats when they delivered Congress to the Republicans. That’s because Republicans made a lot of promises to them in the last election. Those commitments were instrumental to their victory; they were actions Americans were demanding and Republicans were vowing to deliver.

Related Articles

Still a 'community organizer' at heart

We elected President Obama as a statesman and leader. We didn't expect him to be a psychoanalyst and a mock priest. But on April 5 he told Thomas Friedman of The New York Times, "I think the biggest threats that they face may not be coming from Iran invading ... . It's going to be from dissatisfaction inside their own countries." So maniacs are driving themselves to decapitations and crucifixions?

U.S. President Barack Obama speaks during his news conference at the Summit of the Americas in Panama City, Panama, Saturday, April 11, 2015. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Congress must do what Obama won’t

Americans reasonably expect their president to treat himself to an occasional session of introspection, to give himself a grade on whether he's living up to his oath to protect and defend the nation — to ask himself whether he has done anything wrong and if so, how to correct it. Alas, does anyone think it occurs to Barack Obama that he has ever done anything wrong?

How spying shaped modernity

In the wake of the turbulent French Revolution at the turn of the 18th century, crowns rattled atop nervous royal heads throughout Europe. Was beheading monarchs going to become a new continental pastime? Would democratic forces sweep aside regimes whose only claim to "legitimacy" was heritage?

Cover Image of the JVP April 2015 issue: Llallawavis-firmado; Artwork provided by H. Santiago Druetta

Fossil find: Skeleton of towering 'terror bird' found exquisitely preserved

- The Washington Times

It's a bodacious and big-beaked bird, that's for sure. Scientists studying the skeleton of an ancient South American terror bird called Llallawavis scagliai are describing it as "exquisitely preserved." Indeed, over 90 percent of the creature's bony structure is intact, revealing such details as voice box, trachea and the complete palate of a carnivorous predator which strolled the Earth some 3.5 million years ago.

Hillary Rodham Clinton. (Associated Press)

American Conservative Union is definitely not ready for Hillary: 'We've had enough'

- The Washington Times

Enough already. So say conservatives upon confronting the very real possibility that Hillary Clinton will soon announce her intention to run for the White House in 2016. Press reports indicate that she'll make the move on Sunday, possibly on Twitter. And possibly not. "Never before has a presidential candidate played so fast and loose with the truth as has Mrs. Clinton," said American Conservative Union chairman Matt Schlapp.

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker speaks during the Iowa Agriculture Summit in Des Moines, Iowa, on March 7, 2015. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Critiquing the president

President Obama, still the college professor at heart, doesn't easily listen to criticism or argument. Only he knows what's what, and he grades on a steep curve. When Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin critiqued the deal the president is about to strike with Iran, the president retorted that the governor didn't know what he was talking about. He should "bone up" before he says anything, the president said.

Calvin Coolidge

What do you properly call a Hillary?

- The Washington Times

We might be running out of things to be offended by. Feminists, gays and blacks have got so much of what they want that foolish people thought they might pipe down any day now, to let the rest of us rest while they reload.

FILE - In this April 2, 2015 file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in the Rose Garden of the White House in Washington about the breakthrough in the Iranian nuclear talks. Snap back? Not so fast. The biggest enforcement provision in the preliminary nuclear agreement with Iran is turning into one of its mostly hotly contested elements. And this debate barely involves Iran. Instead, it concerns the Obama administration’s promise to quickly re-impose sanctions on Iran if it cheats on any part of the agreement to limit its nuclear program to peaceful pursuits.  (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Iran nuclear deal undercuts Israel's security

One important aspect of the new nuclear agreement with Iran has been ignored altogether. This is the likely impact of the pact upon Israel's strategic nuclear posture. Although the Israeli bomb remains plainly nonthreatening, and in the metaphoric "basement," it is plausible to expect that many countries (both friends and foes) will soon call indignantly for the Jewish state's denuclearization.

Illustration on the negative effects of raising the minimum wage by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How to campaign on the minimum wage

Sen. Rand Paul announced his candidacy for president this week, much to the delight of supporters who believe that government policies often do more harm than good. One issue Mr. Paul has relied on to make his argument on government intervention is the minimum wage.

FILE- In this Nov. 10, 2009 file photo, soldiers salute as they honor victims of the Fort Hood shooting at a memorial service at Fort Hood, Texas. The Army said in a letter addressed to Congress on Friday, Feb. 6, 2015 that the victims of the 2009 shooting that left 13 dead and more than 30 wounded will receive the Purple Hearts many have said they deserve. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam, File)

Honor at Fort Hood

There's a difference, you might say, between a hero and a zero, and President Obama has blurred that difference in Washington. But the Bard was right, truth will out, and so was Abraham Lincoln, you can't fool all the people all the time, not even at the White House. Several heroes are about to get their just rewards.

Choice not basis for civil rights

Civil rights in our nation are provided to citizens on the basis of who they are, not what they do. The fact of being a banker, farmer, priest, plumber, senator, president or any other modern-society job grants no one any civil rights. But those same individuals do have civil rights on the basis of their race, color, religion, sex, age, handicap or national origin. And all of these are components of who these citizens are, not what they do.

What we see and what we don’t see

Can something be both male and female, present and past, light and dark, alive and dead, in the real world and in a fantasy? These are just some of the questions that arise in Ali Smith's tantalizing new novel, "How to Be Both." In an interview with The New York Times, Ms. Smith explained, "The book was about observation and what we see and don't see when we look, and I had a notion that it should be about time." And so it is, very successfully.

Illustration on North Korea's example of nuclear non-compliance as prologue for Iran's likely behavior by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A lesson about Iran from North Korea

In 2014, the U.S. State Department Arms Control Compliance Report stated: "Iran currently is in violation of obligations under [the Nuclear non-Proliferation Treaty], its [United Nations International Atomic Energy Agency] Safeguards Agreement, and relevant U.N. Security Council resolutions ." Question: Why are we negotiating for a new agreement, when existing Iranian Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty (NPT) violations persist unresolved, suggesting that Iran is busily producing nuclear weapons and is unlikely to comply with any new agreement? Historically, such negotiation is unprecedented.

Protestors filled the Capitol rotunda in Helena, Mont., during a February rally to show support in an attempt to change the Montana Constitution to define life as beginning at conception. The so-called personhood initiative is intended to prompt a legal challenge to Roe v. Wade, the 1973 Supreme Court decision that established a legal right to abortion. (AP Photo)

Personhood? Two thirds of Americans say 'fetuses in the womb are people': Poll

- The Washington Times

Two thirds of Americans believe that "fetuses in the womb are people" - that includes 80 percent of Republicans and 56 percent of Democrats. The source is a YouGov poll conducted in the wake of a shocking attack on a pregnant woman in Colorado that left her injured, and resulted in the loss of her unborn child. The pollster addressed that issue too, revealing that 76 percent of Americans overall agree that if an attack on a pregnant woman leads to the death of her unborn child, a murder charge is appropriate.

Illustration on Putin's renewed aggression against Ukraine by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

Putin’s next offensive

Both NATO and the United States have publicly acknowledged that Russia is violating the newest cease-fire over Ukraine, which was recently concluded in Minsk, Belarus. Despite the agreement, Moscow is still sending tanks, armored vehicles, rocket technology and artillery to separatist elements inside Ukraine, and has moved on to occupy the strategically located railroad terminal of Debaltseve.