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Illustration on plans to defeat radical Islam by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating radical Islam

Who is the enemy? It’s been over 15 years since Sept. 11, 2001, and this fundamental question still rattles around. Prominent answers have included evildoers, violent extremists, terrorists, Muslims, and Islamists.

Congressman Matt Cartwright speaks during a rally held at the Lackawanna County Courthouse in Scranton Pa., Sunday Feb. 19, 2017, to focus on protecting Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid. (Jason Farmer/The Times & Tribune via AP)

Congress must stop death by decree

At the first meeting of the Trump Leadership Council — an advisory group consisting of top CEOs from major companies — President Donald Trump asked these business leaders what was their biggest problem. I expected the answer to be America’s anti-growth tax system.

Increasing Cyber Vandalism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The cyberhacking to come

If you thought the 2016 presidential election was an orgy of cyber hacking of Hillary Clinton’s private email server, of the Democratic Party computers being trawled through, and of fake news stories about Donald Trump’s hijinks in Russia, you are right. But you ain’t seen nothing yet.

Illustration on choice in health care by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

How the market can fix health care

Republicans agree that Obamacare has failed and must be repealed. But they can’t agree on the replacement “plan.”

Illustration on economic and technological ties between America and Israel by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The U.S.-Israel economic bond

Much of the talk around President Trump’s meeting this week with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House surrounds the political and security relationship between the two countries. That is important. But it is only part of the story. Despite having a tiny population of eight million people, Israel is playing a crucial role in helping to power the U.S. economy for the next generation.

California Claim Jumpers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why California’s mining ban is against the law

If you ask a rural Westerner how he feels about federal lands, the response will likely contain plenty of four-letter words. For decades, decisions made by faraway bureaucrats to restrict the productive uses of these lands have significantly affected nearby property owners and local economies, creating a constant source of conflict.

President Donald Trump (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Russia conundrum

Donald Trump’s presidency is in deep trouble. After nearly four weeks in office, he has yet to finish filling his administration’s top posts, and Congress is about to conduct an investigation into his ties to Russia.

CIA Bullies Trump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The CIA’s affront to Trump

The CIA has denied a security clearance to Trump National Security Council (NSC) official Robin Townley without any allegation, much less evidence of disloyalty to the United States. Quite simply, it is because the CIA disapproves of Mr. Townley’s attitude toward the agency, and this is unprecedented.

President Donald Trump calls out to the media after escorting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to his car to depart the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Intellectual honesty and political indifference

Over the past weekend, Trump administration officials offered harsh criticisms of the judicial interference with the enforcement of the president’s immigration order. The Jan. 27 order suspended the immigration privileges of all refugees from Syria indefinitely and all immigrants from seven designated countries for 90 days.

ISIS Drone Attacks Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

ISIS drones could target Europe

Killer drones guided by Islamic State terrorists have made their debut in Northern Iraq, prompting concern about a new terror weapon outside of Iraq.

Illustration on the EMP threat to the U.S. from North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

North Korea, the real threat

When might North Korean develop missiles capable of striking the United States? Today.

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Illustration on republicans options with Obamacare by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The inevitable Obamacare death spiral

President Trump is forcing congressional Republicans to quickly reckon with reality -- either find a way to radically lower health care costs or suffer the wrath of angry voters.

New Zealand's poet laureate looks back

For a country with a population of only a little more than four-and-a-half million, New Zealand has produced more than its fair share of notable writers, starting a century ago with Katherine Mansfield,

Illustration of the good Samaritan by Alexander Hunter (after a traditional mosaic)/ The Washington Times

'Is every American entitled to health care?'

During CNN's health care debate on Feb. 7, Sen. Bernie Sanders posed this question to Sen. Ted Cruz: "Is every American entitled to health care?" It's a probing question, but here's an even more penetrating one: Am I my brother's keeper?

Allowing Iran to Inspect Themselves Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Revealing Obama's deals

President Trump has often said that Barack Obama's nuclear weapons deal with Iran was a "terrible deal." He's right. But whatever he decides to do about it, the opposition is apparent and will only grow both here and abroad.President Trump has often said that Barack Obama's nuclear weapons deal with Iran was a "terrible deal." He's right. But whatever he decides to do about it, the opposition is apparent and will only grow both here and abroad.

In this Jan. 20, 2017 photo, a worker packs rose buds to be shipped to the United States ahead of Valentine's Day, at the Ayura flower company in Tocancipa, north of Bogota, Colombia. The country's flower industry took off in the early 1990s when the U.S. Congress passed a law eliminating tariffs on goods from Andean drug-producing nations in a bid to encourage legal exports instead. (AP Photo/Fernando Vergara)

Purging the marriage penalty

A Valentine's Day present from the federal government? It could happen. No, I'm not talking about flowers or candy. I'm talking about getting rid of the "marriage penalty" that's built into one of our biggest welfare programs.

John Adams (Associated Press) ** FILE **

How Trump's 'disarray' may be merely strategy

- The Washington Times

There's a hint or two that Trump Derangement Syndrome, or TDS, which has so savaged the chattering class, may be subsiding, if only a little. There's no cure for TDS, but the passion that drives it eventually exhausts the afflicted.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Feb. 14, 2017

States that work for business

If you were going to start a new business in the United States that was not location dependent, what state would choose? Countries, states and cities all compete to attract businesses -- both large and small. More businesses mean more jobs and usually greater prosperity.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: NFL talent still getting snubbed

I was disappointed that longtime Washington Redskins tackle Joe Jacoby was again overlooked by the Pro Football Hall of Fame ("Redskins great Joe Jacoby does not make Hall of Fame," Web, Feb. 4). The legendary "Hog," a four-time Pro Bowler (1983-1986) and three-time Super Bowl champion (XVII, XXII, XXVI), deserves the honor.

Repeal costly Obamacare now

For eight long years we Americans have waited for Obamacare to be repealed. Republicans have used the promise of repeal to get reelected. It appears this was a false promise, a betrayal.

President Donald Trump salutes back to a Marines honor guard member as he disembarks Marine One upon arrival at the White House in Washington, Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017, from a trip to Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

No sanctuary for the money

Some of our big-city mayors are having a high old time on a play date, with demonstrations of piety and righteous indignation in a game of "you show me yours and I'll show you mine." They get to needle President Trump from a distance for his attempt to impose order on the rush of illegal immigrants into the United States.

President Donald Trump walks on the South Lawn upon arrival at the White House in Washington, Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017, from a trip to Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Mischief by the 9th Circuit

President Trump suggested strongly at the end of a tumultuous week that he might not appeal the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision upholding the trashing of his executive order limiting the admission of refugees from seven chaotic and terror-prone nations of the Middle East.

Asian Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Dealing with North Korea

Since Kim Jong-un took over from his father in December 2011 as the supreme leader, the nuclear threat from North Korea has increased exponentially. Over this five-year period, North Korea has conducted four progressively larger nuclear tests and more than 50 ballistic missile launches. In 2016 alone, North Korea conducted two nuclear tests and 25 missile launches, to include a June 2016 successful test of its Musudan Intermediate Range Ballistic missile, with a range of 4000 kilometers, and an August 2016 successful submarine-launched ballistic missile, with a range of 1000 kilometers.

Monica Crowley     Associated Press photo

Rising to Monica Crowley's defense

When CNN and Politico charged last month that Monica Crowley -- my longtime friend and editor at The Washington Times -- was a serial plagiarist, the sickening headlines left me angry. And more than slightly confused.

Revisiting the Romanovs' revolutionary capital

British historian Helen Rappaport, who has written memorably about Russia's royal Romanovs, here turns her attention to their capital city during the year when it ceased to be theirs.

Illustration on antiterrorist measures in France by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

The ACLU's war on common sense

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is leading the charge against President Trump's order to temporarily halt immigrants from seven Middle Eastern countries identified by the Obama administration as hotbeds of terrorism.

Illustration on the financial inequities of class action lawsuits by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Protecting consumers from swindlers

Trump administration spokeswoman Kellyanne Conway recently defended false statements about inauguration crowd size as "alternative facts," provoking a great kerfuffle. But in the class-action world, trial lawyers have been making millions on alternative facts for decades. And, astonishingly, courts disagree over whether it's permissible for lawyers to use alternative facts to cheat their consumer clients.