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Illustration on the need for Arab states to deal with Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A harsh message worth sending

Just when everyone here was deep in preoccupation with partisan fantasy over whether Donald Trump should be impeached or removed by the 25th Amendment, the president changed the subject. Presidents can do that.

Illustration on Saudia Arabian duplicity by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saudi Arabia’s duplicity

Trusting Saudi Arabia to combat terrorists and extremists and “drive them out,” as President Trump called on the kingdom and other Arab and Muslim nations to do in his Riyadh speech, is akin to forging an alliance with the Ku Klux Klan to combat racism and anti-Semitism.

Protesters from labor and other progressive groups fill the rotunda of the state Capitol in St. Paul, Minn., on Wednesday, May 24, 2017, to demand that Democratic Gov. Mark Dayton veto the bills that passed before the Minnesota Legislature's special session bogged down earlier in the day. (AP Photo/Steve Karnowski)

The dirty secret behind big labor’s decline

- The Washington Times

My father was a toolmaker and union organizer who, for many years, headed the Rockford, Ill. Labor Council while my mother was serving five terms as head of the Women’s Auxiliary of the United Auto Workers. Dad worked as a machinist and my mother as a waitress and clerk in a local jewelry store until my dad retired and joined a couple of buddies to buy a bar.

Cutting Taxes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A rare chance to boost small businesses

Among the many lessons our current leadership should learn from Ronald Reagan’s effective governance are his initiatives to revitalize the American economy. Most relevant today is remembering President Reagan’s tax cuts and corporate tax reform of 1986 enacted with bipartisan support that produced sustained economic growth.

FILE - In this Saturday, May 20, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump holds a sword and sways with traditional dancers during a welcome ceremony at Murabba Palace, in Riyadh. Trump and his entourage were treated to a traditional all-male Saudi sword dance. Standing shoulder-to-shoulder with the Saudi king, Trump swayed side to side and briefly joined the groove. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Trump’s vision for the Middle East

President Trump arrived in the Arabian desert hoping to realign the politics of the Middle East in the aftermath of a failed Obama policy. For eight years, President Obama tilted in the direction of Iran, believing that the influence of the Shia could balance Sunni dominance.

Illustration on biometric screening security measures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Integrating biometrics into visitor screening

The horrible attack in Manchester, coupled with the recent release of the Department of Homeland Security’s Visa Overstay Report, should again force us to ask the question, are we doing everything we can to properly vet those seeking to come to the United States?

The Media Research Center has cited some of the worst "impeachment" talk featured on broadcast and cable networks. (Media Research Center image)

Inside the Beltway: Gauging the worst of the ‘impeachment’ chatter

- The Washington Times

The liberal news media’s unprecedented outcry against President Trump continues, and it constantly mutates. Whether Americans pay attention to all this chatter remains to be seen. Some of the remarks are worse than others, however. Geoffrey Dickens, deputy research director for the Media Research Center, pored over news footage from the last three weeks to determine the best of the worst of the commentary. Or maybe that should be the worst of the worst.

People cry after a vigil in Albert Square, Manchester, England, Tuesday May 23, 2017, the day after the suicide attack at an Ariana Grande concert that left 22 people dead as it ended on Monday night. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

Another lesson from Manchester

After the horrific carnage unleashed by the terrorist attack in Manchester, England, some of the reactions were inexplicable. We’re used to jihadis celebrating the horror of mass murder, but it’s still perplexing to hear Western leaders and media reissue their bizarre insistence that we need to get used to the sick and depraved.

Illustration of Roger Ailes    The Washington Times

Roger Ailes’ exit, stage right

A major threat to the predominance of the Kultursmog in these United States passed away last week, but he had succeeded in what he set out to do, namely: to damage the left in America beyond any hope of recovery. Not many people recognize this, but it is nonetheless true.

Illustration on Turkish security attacks on American protesters in Washington, DC by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When armed thugs come to town

Two times in two years, Turkish President Reycep Tayyip Erdogan visited our nation’s capital, and two times in two years his armed thugs attacked peaceful people on our streets. This time, his people sent nine Americans to the hospital.

Illustration on the benefits of biofuel by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cultivating homegrown energy solutions

With all the publicity around fracking, it’s easy to assume that America’s own domestic oil production is more than enough to fuel a growing economy. It certainly helps. But there’s no magic bullet that will ensure long-term American energy security.

Go player Ke Jie, center, speaks at a press conference after playing a match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo, during the Future of Go Summit in Wuzhen in eastern China's Zhejiang Province, Tuesday, May 23, 2017. Ke Jie, the world's top-ranked Go player, started a three-round showdown on Tuesday against AlphaGo, which beat a South Korean Go master in a five-round showdown last year. (AP Photo/Peng Peng)

The great crawl of China

The world has watched with amazement as China sprints toward its goal of becoming an advanced economy. Average annual gross domestic product (GDP) growth of 10 percent over the last 20 years has raised hundreds of millions of its citizens out of poverty and transformed China into an economic powerhouse.

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Illustration on Trump's potential effect on economic growth by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Moving toward 3 percent growth

President Trump's economic team paints a rosier picture about what his policies could accomplish than the economics profession is willing to endorse.

Illustration on imprisoned felons on the voter rolls by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

The ACLU's army of ex-cons

Not content with filing nuisance lawsuits all over the country, most of them aimed at thwarting the Trump administration, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is plunging into local political campaigns.

Illustration on Iran's threat to an independent Kurdistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An independent Kurdistan

In order to assist the creation of a Shia Crescent from the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean Sea, the question remains: Is Iran working to thwart the creation of an independent Kurdistan? Are they working together with Syria in order to further this strategic goal? According to an Iraqi source, Iran is working to thwart the creation of an independent Kurdistan by trying to instigate a civil war among the Kurds by supporting groups opposed to Masoud Barzani. They are doing this because they perceive Kurdish autonomy in Northern Iraq to be a threat and they view the internal divisions among the Kurds to be the most effective way to destroy the dream of an independent Kurdistan for the Kurds presently are not united.

Saul Bellow's politics

A POLITICAL COMPANION TO SAUL BELLOWIt is hard to overstate the importance of politics in the works of Nobel Laureate Saul Bellow. From his teenage years in high school, Bellow was a profoundly political person, deeply engaged in the ideologies and issues of his day.

Information-leaking hypocrisy

On the one hand, Democrats are outraged over President Trump's "treasonable" interactions with the Russians. On the other, their sympathetic minions in the CIA selectively leak classified material in an attempt to malign and scuttle Mr. Trump's presidency. The hypocrisy is astounding. Too busy castigating Mr. Trump and colluding to pave a path to his impeachment, the Democrats insist that the people's business wait while they conduct their witch hunts.

Hayden enhances Library

When Carla Hayden, the first woman and first African-American to become the Librarian of Congress, visited my hometown to give the commencement address to the undergraduate students at Rutgers University, Camden campus, last week, I was elated. Ms. Hayden is a first in so many ways.

FILE - In this Jan. 27, 2015 file photo, President Barack Obama and first lady Michelle Obama stand with new Saudi King Salman bin Abdul Aziz they arrive on Air Force One at King Khalid International Airport, in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Ignoring President Donald Trump's past admonition, U.S. first lady Melania Trump did not cover her head Saturday when they arrived in Saudi Arabia on the opening leg of his first international tour since taking office. Two years ago, then-citizen Trump criticized then-first lady Michelle Obama's decision to go bare-headed on a January 2015 visit with her husband. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Clockwork justice

Racial and religious discrimination is easy to allege and difficult to prove, but taking offense has become the nation's fastest growing industry. Tort lawyers tend the industry with great care and concern.

FILE - In this Nov. 28, 1967, file photo, the five Rockefeller Brothers pose for photos in New York as they gather to receive gold medals from the National Institute of social sciences. From left are: David Rockefeller, President of the Chase Manhattan Bank; Winthrop Rockefeller, Governor of Arkansas; Frank Pace, President of the NISS; John D. Rockefeller 3rd, Chairman of the Rockefeller Foundation; Nelson Rockefeller, Governor of New York; and Laurence Rockefeller, a conservation adviser to President Johnson. David Rockefeller, the billionaire philanthropist who was the last of his generation in the famously philanthropic Rockefeller family died. David Rockefeller was 101 years old. (AP Photo/File)

Tax lessons from our richest state

Soaking the rich is fun, but the rich aren't always as rich as the masses think they are. John D. Rockefeller might have used hundred-dollar bills to light his cigars, as in the popular imagination of his day, but Connecticut is learning that the supply of millionaires and hundred-dollar bills is finite.

President Donald Trump attends commencement exercises at the U.S. Coast Guard Academy in New London, Conn., Wednesday, May 17, 2017, where he also gave the commencement address. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

The art of the Trump take-down

- The Washington Times

Taking down President Donald Trump has become an art of late -- a national past-time, like going to a baseball game, or barbecuing on the Fourth of July.

Illustration on the crisis in Venezuela by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Venezuela's self-made crisis

Time is running out for Venezuela, a nation of 31 million with perhaps the world's largest proved reserves of crude oil. The consequences of its descent for its neighbors and for the United States, whether into dictatorship, civil war, or bloody chaos, demand an immediate response — well beyond the call for dialogue, partial targeted sanctions, and resolutions.

Illustration on Trump administration difficulties by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

The Comey memo

When the news broke this week that President Trump had passed highly classified information to the Russian foreign minister at a White House meeting, administration officials said the story was "false."

Coordinated Preemptive Korea Attack Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Forging a strategy for North Korea

If one consults the great strategists of the human experience such as Karl Von Clausewitz, Sun Tzu, or B.H. Liddell Hart the goal of strategy never changes: it is the application of power in order to attain a clear objective, which in the case for grand strategy could be multi-generational.

The Swamp is Winning Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why swamp fever must be cured

The accusations in the media against President Donald Trump are reaching hysterical levels. This has also been labeled "Trump Derangement Syndrome," and is characterized by a reporter's firm belief (shared by many Democratic politicians and Hillary Clinton supporters) that Mr. Trump is illegitimately occupying the Oval Office, is not fit for presidential duty, and must be ousted one way or another.

How Austen novels are 'revolutionary at their heart'

The default setting for a novel is the present day. We also have historical novels, sci-fic novels, gothic novels, and novels about other worlds -- including chicklit and Scandi Noir. We call them "genre novels" to distinguish them from mainstream fiction about believable characters and events in credible places.

Tyranny's tyranny, no matter flavor

After ratification of the Constitution, Benjamin Franklin was said to have walked out of Independence Hall and been asked by a passer-by, "What have you created?" Franklin replied, "A democracy, if you can keep it." Franklin contemporary Thomas Jefferson is credited with having said, "I hold it that a little rebellion now and then is a good thing " Franklin, Jefferson and many of the Founders were powerful thinkers on social, religious, scientific, moral and secular matters. Yet they knew they needed each other if they had any hope of their new nation surviving.

State Rep. Jody Richards, D-Bowling Green, reads a story to Head Start children at Community Action of Southern Kentucky, Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Bowling Green, Ky. (Bac Totrong/Daily News via AP)

Good First Amendment news

Sometimes there's a nugget of something good in the daily ration of bad news. A T-shirt printer in Lexington, Ky., one Blaine Adamson, won a state court ruling early this month that he was within his First Amendment rights to refuse to print an offensive message on T-shirts ordered by the Gay and Lesbian Services Organization for a "gay pride" parade.

President Donald Trump listens to Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos, left, speak during a news conference in the East Room of the White House, Thursday, May 18, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A promise not kept

During the late, lamented campaign of 2016, when brave talk was in season, Donald Trump promised faithfully that once he was president he would take the United States out of the infamous Paris climate accord, an international agreement signed and promoted by Barack Obama that locks the United States into all kinds of anti-competitive things "to combat global climate change."