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Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at a rally Tuesday, Sept. 27, 2016, in Melbourne, Fla. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Voting for growth

Voters must shake up Washington if they want a more prosperous future.

FILE - In this Saturday, Aug. 13, 2016 file photo, a soldier from the 1st Battalion of the Iraqi Special Operations Forces listens to an address by his commander after a training exercise to prepare for the operation to re-take Mosul from Islamic State militants, in Baghdad, Iraq. The disparate groups that make up Iraq's security forces are converging on the city of Mosul, lining up for a battle on the historic plains of northern Iraq that is likely to be decisive in the war against the Islamic State group(AP Photo/Maya Alleruzzo, File)

What to do when a ‘narrative war’ fails

Apologies to White House spokesman Josh Earnest, who this week claimed we are in a “narrative war” with the Islamic State, or ISIS, but here’s the only narrative that the current crop of jihadists will understand: “When I am president of the United States, I will be eager and able to unleash on you history’s biggest, baddest collection of warriors, and should you choose to oppose them on the battlefield, they will kill you and break your stuff. Guaranteed.”

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's bellicose attitude by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the Donald is the dove

It’s interesting when a longtime Democrat and long-ago speechwriter for John and Robert Kennedy declares he will vote for Donald Trump. That’s what Adam Walinsky did in Politico Magazine the other day. It’s even more interesting when hostile Democrats rush to defend Hillary Clinton from Mr. Walinsky’s attack, as Peter Beinart did in an article in The Atlantic calling Mr. Walinsky’s piece an “absurd and dishonest essay.”

Egg Shell Helmet Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Inmates’ defective work

A scathing report of a joint investigation by the Justice Department’s Inspector General and the Defense Criminal Investigative Service found that the Bureau of Prisons’ Federal Prison Industries (FPI) produced more than 100,000 combat helmets that were defective and would “likely cause serious injury or death to the wearer.”

Fresh Start Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The human face of overcriminalization

A young man from a low-income family sells small amounts of marijuana when real opportunity eludes him. He’s arrested and incarcerated several times. After being convicted and serving his sentence, he leaves prison with a record that will follow him for the rest of his life.

Illustration on the Colombia peace accord and cocaine exportation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Purchasing peace with cocaine?

Ninety-five percent of the cocaine sold on the streets of the United States today comes from Columbia. What’s more, the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, the State Department and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime all agree that the cultivation of coca, the plant used for making cocaine, is surging again in Colombia

John Kennedy     Associated Press photo

Goats in the White House

- The Washington Times

It’s the conceit of every age that it’s uniquely entitled to all the superlatives: it’s the best, the worst, the biggest, the smallest. Nothing before was anything like the present age, nor is it possible that anything in the future will surpass it.

Illustration on the potential political rift presented by the upcoming election by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When an election produces a political realignment

What do the election years 1800, 1828, 1860, 1896, 1932 and 1980 have in political common? They are usually described as “critical” or “realigning” elections by historians who argue they produced a significant realignment in our political system.

President Barack Obama speaks at the 2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference held in the Mellon Auditorium in Washington, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Another useless Iraq surge

Pessimists and cynics are annoying, mostly because events prove them to be right far more often than they are proven wrong. Sometimes pessimism is the necessary result of an examination of history.

Illustration on new moves toward animal liberation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Food for thought about animal liberation

Peter Singer, Princeton professor and author of the book “Animal Liberation,” will be taking his radical views center stage at the upcoming “The Future of Food” event in Washington, D.C. Hosted by the extremist Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the choice of Mr. Singer to keynote the event offers a peek at just how out of touch animal liberation activists are: While Mr. Singer is against eating animals, he’s OK with the idea of having sex with them.

The Second Jacksonian Revolution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When ‘deplorables’ took back their country

The 1829 inauguration of Andrew Jackson ranks as the most raucous in American history. Presidents in those days traditionally held open house for the general public after being sworn in, but no one anticipated that hordes of Jackson’s rough-and-tumble supporters would descend on the nation’s capital for the big day or that they would troupe over to the White House following his inaugural address to shake his hand and guzzle free booze.

Growing the American Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to jump-start the economy

As the presidential debates get underway, we hope that the moderators set personalities aside and spend some quality time asking questions of both candidates about their plans to grow the American economy.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves to the crowd during a rally in Roanoke, Va., Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Trump faces Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton in the first of three debates Monday.  (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Terrorism, refugees and Donald Trump

Hilary Clinton’s refugee plan is an open invitation for Radical Islam’s unyielding nature to run roughshod over American culture.

Related Articles

Call terrorism by its name

When will terrorist actions actually be called terrorism by the leaders of this country? After the explosion in New York City, Gov. Cuomo stated that there was no evidence of international terrorism connected to it.

Protesters surround a police vehicle in Charlotte, N.C. on Tuesday, Sept. 20, 2016. Authorities used tear gas to disperse protesters in an overnight demonstration that broke out Tuesday after Keith Lamont Scott was fatally shot by an officer at an apartment complex. (Jeff Siner/The Charlotte Observer via AP)

Rioting in North Carolina

Black lives matter, and they matter so much that everyone, black or white, is responsible for protecting them. That begins with demanding that "demonstrators" and "protesters" pay a little respect to the black lives they say they honor.

No purse from this sow

Fellow Democrats, wake up. There is nothing -- absolutely nothing -- in either the soul or the track record of Hillary Clinton that should make voters enthusiastic. Virtually every day a new scandal surfaces, and the rumors are that the really big scandals have yet to emerge ("Millennial voters spurning Clinton, but not for GOP," Web, Sept. 19).

Liberals' refugee penance

This week the United States welcomed its 10,000th Syrian refugee. There are 30,000 more waiting in line. This helping of distressed human beings is a big thrill to confused Democrats. It doesn't matter that last Sunday bombs were set off in New York and New Jersey, or that nine people were sliced with a cleaver in Minnesota. And what was the glue that connected these events? Muslim hatred of western values.

President Barack Obama speaks at the U.S.-Africa Business Forum at The Plaza Hotel in New York, Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2016. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Working overtime against the economy

Barack Obama is worried about the legacy he'll bequeath to history in just three months. Like all presidents he wants to be remembered as a good president if not a great president, but he keeps doing things that will render the memory of his presidency as something forgettable between the work of Chester Alan Arthur and Jimmy Carter.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Scorched Earth: Restoring the Country After Obama'

"Scorched Earth: Restoring the Country After Obama" by Michael Savage is just what you'd expect from the stalwart radio talk show host -- a no-holds-barred, tell-it-like-it-is recounting of leftist-controlled life under the Obama administration and warning of the potential dire decline of America if such administration policies continue under a Clinton presidency.

Illustration on two possible economic futures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Liars, statistics and politics

This presidential season Americans have been treated to the usual outrageous campaign promises and extraordinary candidate alibis about past transgressions, but those pale in comparison to claims about gains in family incomes served up by the Obama administration last week.

Fifteen years after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks 2,976 American flags were displayed in memory of each person who died. Families of the victims say they have waited long enough and want legislation granting them the right to sue Saudi officials who they say are culprits. (Associated Press)

Americanism over transnationalism

Throughout this presidential campaign we've heard many liberals and neoconservatives carp against the nationalism espoused by Donald Trump and condemn how nationalism continues to resonate among tens of millions of regular Americans. Elitists and media messengers likewise express horror when Mr. Trump announces that in all matters, be they domestic or foreign, his policy and attitude will be "America first."

Illustration on Obama's exit before the consequences by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

War clouds are gathering

This summer, President Obama was often golfing. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were promising to let the world be. The end of summer seemed sleepy, the world relatively calm.

Illustration contrasting Trumpand Hillary on Islamic jihadism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More terror, more denials

In Florida Monday, following the bombings in New York and New Jersey, Donald Trump referred to the captured bombing suspect, Ahmad Khan Rahami, as an "evil thug." He then added, "Hillary Clinton is a weak and ineffective person and I will tell you, if you choose Donald Trump, these problems are going to go away far, far greater than anybody would think."

Illustration on the 2016 presidential contest by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Pop goes the presidency

Every presidential campaign draws on familiar pop culture references to bring the candidates down to earth. Critics use the references to illuminate the differences between voters of different generations.

Trump Boxing Glove Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Trump can knock out Hillary in the first debate

- The Washington Times

It promises to be the greatest show on earth: the first presidential debate to be held Monday night at Hofstra University in New York. Rarely has a political event attracted this kind of Super Bowl-level excitement, curiosity and anticipation. Then again, rarely have we had two presidential candidates who light up the political sky like Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

Illustration on 800 persons being granted citizenship rather than deportation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The U.S. immigration system in chaos

Germans proving they're not sheeple are rejecting their mass-immigration-promoting ruling party in elections. The U.S. immigration system, in chaos, "mistakenly" gives citizenship to 800 immigrants ordered deported. Two foreign-born Islamists go on terror rampages in the United States.

What about gang violence?

During my lifetime, both Democratic and Republican presidents, House and Senate members and the mainstream media have shown just how out of touch they are with regular Americans.

Emmys show Hollywood's decline

The insidious injustice of O.J. Simpson getting away with a vicious double murder and then being honored by dominating the Emmy Awards comes as no surprise, as it headlines the reckless decline of the entertainment industry ("'Game of Thrones,' 'Veep' take top honors at Emmys," Web, Sept. 18).