Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Constitutional Change in Turkey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

What Turkey’s referendum reveals

The outcome of the Turkish vote on constitutional changes, notwithstanding lingering allegations of fraud, represents further evidence of a crumbling global status quo.

Catching Illegal Voters Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Protecting the right to vote

A jury of 10 women and two men in Tarrant County, Texas, found Rosa Ortega guilty of voting illegally and sentenced her to eight years in jail.

Illustration on the Trump dollar by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Donald Trump’s dollar

President Donald Trump’s assertion this week that the “dollar is getting too strong” led to a sharp decline in the value of the greenback.

Illustration on the true intent of the Muslim Brotherhood by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Earning its terrorist designation

In an April 11 Brookings Institution report titled “Is the Muslim Brotherhood a terrorist organization?” senior fellow Shadi Hamid states that the Trump administration’s proposed designation of the Muslim Brotherhood as a terrorist group “could have significant consequences for the U.S., the Middle East, and the world.”

Bill O'Reilly (Associated Press)

The high price of Fox hunting

- The Washington Times

The famous bimbo eruptions are back (as if they had ever really gone away), and for once Bubba appears to be in the clear. No new accusations of rude behavior have been lodged against him.

Illustration on a poll-driven view of America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Misleading polls and fake news

Newscasts continue to be filled with references to polling numbers that suggest President Trump and his policies are deeply unpopular, and that the American people overwhelmingly oppose the actions taken by America’s 45th president during his first 100 days in office.

The Non-biodegradable Plastic Bottle Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How an overreaching FTC attacks the environment

The proliferation of plastic on land and in our oceans — plastic that can take hundreds of years to biodegrade — is among the most serious environmental issues in the world. As a consumer, wouldn’t you want to know about a plastic bottle that biodegraded in significantly less time?

Illustration on Trump's first 100 days by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

The president’s ongoing challenges

The Trump administration is still in the throes of getting its foreign policy act together, expressing conflicting messages on Russia, Syria and other troubles abroad as it nears the 100th day of his presidency.

Theresa May (The Washington Times illustration)

With unexpected crackle and snap, Theresa May becomes Theresa Will

Prime Minister Theresa May is giving herself a new identity. Suddenly she’s no longer “Theresa Maybe,” showing her mettle by moving toward Margaret Thatcher’s politics of the bold and unexpected. She still has a way to go to transform that mettle into the steel of the Iron Lady, but she may be on her way.

North Korean school girls react upon seeing their photograph being taken as they walk along Mirae Scientists Street on Wednesday, April 19, 2017, in Pyongyang, North Korea. Tensions have spiked in recent weeks over North Korea's advancing nuclear technology and missile arsenal. But in Pyongyang, where war would mean untold horrors, few people seem to care much at all. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

What next with North Korea?

There was a moment at Press Secretary Sean Spicer’s White House briefing Monday that was significant. Asked by a reporter about North Korea’s missile launch last weekend, Mr. Spicer said the administration was aware of the launch and that “it failed.” End of story. Next question, please.

A woman collecting money for charity stands next to a quote written on an information board at Tower Hill underground train station, written in defiance of the previous day's attack in London, Thursday, in this March 23, 2017, file photo. On Wednesday, a man went on a deadly rampage, first driving a car into pedestrians then stabbing a police officer to death before being fatally shot by police within Parliament's grounds in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham) ** FILE **

Charity keeps America free

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump’s senior advisers, deep in the weeds of tax reform, are reportedly looking at ways to save the middle class by placing more financial responsibilities on the shoulders of the wealthy — and part of the plan being discussed is to limit the level of deductions charitable organizations can take. This is the wrong way to go.

Emergence of Redneck Porn Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redneck porn

The 20th century gave us a good many new literary genres. Modernism, Futurism, Dadaism. Later on there was Post-modernism, Structuralism, Deconstruction. And now there’s a new literary genre: Redneck Porn.

Illustration on progressivism and government by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Apocalyptic liberalism

Shortly after the 2008 election, President Obama’s soon-to-be chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel, infamously declared, “You never let a serious crisis go to waste.”

Related Articles

Give states back their land

In his otherwise excellent article on federal land grabs ("A monumental issue in Maine," B3, April 17), Robert Knight fails to mention why Washington is able to get away with this.

How to sway North Korea

President Trump has pointed out the strong linkage between China and North Korea, and he correctly assumes China can influence North Korea's weapons-development program. We must work with China to resolve this situation, the Chinese encroachment in the South China Sea and the trade-deficit imbalance.

'Snowflake' schools prepare no one

How ironic was The Washington Times' juxtaposition of two articles in yesterday's edition ("The Halls of Ivy," Inside the Beltway; "Trump to Use Executive Order to Push 'Hire American,'"). Maybe when universities like Arizona State start offering, teaching and testing students on courses that actually prepare them for a future in the work world instead of wasting parents' and taxpayers' money on country-club living with a side helping of "snowflake" protection, perhaps then the H-1B visa program will become extinct. If I were the CEO of a company looking to hire people with the skill sets needed to improve my business, these students would be at the bottom of my list.

Supporters of the 'no' vote, chant slogans during a protest against the referendum outcome, on the Aegean Sea city of Izmir, Turkey, Tuesday, April 18, 2017. Turkey's main opposition party has filed a formal request seeking Sunday's referendum to be annulled because of voting irregularities. (AP Photo/Emre Tazegul)

Cooking Turkey's goose

Turkey has been bumping along on the ragged margins of democracy for years. With this week's slim approval of a governmental reform referendum, President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has proclaimed that the nation can "change gears and continue along our course more quickly."

Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May walks out of 10 Downing Street to speak to the media in London, Tuesday April 18, 2017. British Prime Minister Theresa May announced she will seek early election on June 8 (AP Photo/Alastair Grant)

Theresa May's gamble

Theresa May showed herself Tuesday to be a bit of a gambler, but only a bit. Armed with public-opinion polls revealing an unusual opportunity to trade a sure thing for a better thing, she stunned Britain, surprised Europe and fascinated Washington by calling for new parliamentary elections on June 8.

Bill O'Reilly

Bill O'Reilly -- good riddance to bad rubbish

With Bill O'Reilly, so many shoes have dropped that he's looking like Imelda Marcos. Just two weeks ago, The New York Times reported that Fox paid out $13 million to five women who accused the bombastic bloviator of sexual harassment. Mr. O'Reilly told The Times that he settled only to avoid hurting his family.

Women look at video of Syria Charity presentation inside an exhibition hall at the France Muslim Annual Fair in Le Bourget, north of Paris, in this Saturday, April 15, 2017, file photo. Tens of thousands of Muslims are expected at the three-day event this weekend organized by the ultra-conservative Union of Islamic Organizations of France. It includes merchant stalls, Koran readings, prayers and speeches by leading Muslim figures as Muslims of France want to make sure their voices are heard in France's presidential elections. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

The Islam clash in America

- The Washington Times

The arrest and charge of an Indian woman, Jumana Fakhruddin Nagarwala, for performing female genital mutilation on two young girls in Michigan, brings front and center the question of whether certain religions are compatible with America's Constitution. Certain religions -- ha. Let's be blunt here. We're talking about Islam.

Illustration on the diminishing returns of the $15 minimum wage quest by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A story of union waste

Lost in the shuffle of health care debates and Syrian airstrikes, America's most boisterous union recently released its 2016 financials. The Service Employees International Union (SEIU) -- the catalyst of the Fight for $15 and a Union campaign -- reveals exactly how union bosses spent member dues money last year.

Illustration on difficulties with tax cuts by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Trump's taxing problems

Donald Trump won the presidency in significant measure on a promise to deliver more robust growth and better jobs. As things stand, his efforts and GOP prospects for the midterm elections will importantly hinge on accomplishing tax reforms that encourage more investment.

Illustration on the wonders of incentivization by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In praise of the price system

Kinder and gentler governments use market-based price incentives and less coercion. But all too many government officials forget about the superiority of the price system, and resort to the threat of or actual violence to get the people to do what they want. Business people use the price system to attract customers with lower prices and good employees by offering higher wages (the price of work) rather than coercion.

President Donald Trump holds up a pen he used to sign one of various bills in the Roosevelt Room of the White House, Monday, March 27, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo file photo)

Obstructions to tax simplicity

Thanks to the beneficence of the federal government (and the calendar), we Americans have until midnight on April 18 to file our income taxes. It's too bad filing taxes wasn't an easier process.

Russian Iskander Missiles in Armenia Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Nuclear trouble in Azerbaijan

The Caucasus Mountains that run between the Black and Caspian Seas could soon turn into a nuclear flash point because of dangerous saber-rattling by Armenian President Serzh Sargsyan.