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FILE - In this March 20, 2013 file photo, President Barack Obama and Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu huddle during their joint news conference in Jerusalem, Israel. This was never happy-ever-after waiting to happen. When Obama and Netanyahu took office early in 2009, there were plenty of reasons to expect their relationship would be difficult. The cerebral president and the brash prime minister have stark differences in personality, politics and world views. Still, few could have predicted the downward spiral of finger-pointing, backbiting, lecturing and outright name-calling that has occurred. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

The occasion the Democrats asked for

- The Washington Times

The Democrats set out to teach John Boehner and Benjamin Netanyahu a lesson. They would boycott the Israeli prime minister’s speech to Congress and apply enough pressure to cancel the speech, keep Mr. Netanyahu at home and embarrass the Republicans who invited him here. What a happy day’s work that would be.

American Defense if Israel Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Standing with Israel in a dangerous world

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu will address a joint session of Congress on Tuesday. Such an invitation is one of the highest honors we can bestow on a foreign leader. And such a speech is normally an occasion of unity in Washington, when elected officials put partisan politics aside and come together to focus on weighty issues of national security.

Failure to Protect Against Iranian Nukes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Iran goes nuclear

Our attention these days with regard to security is understandably riveted on the Islamic State, or ISIS, and its hideous decapitations, rapes and live immolations. We must deal with the Islamic State, but it is not the gravest threat we face. The Israelis are right — we should awaken to the fact that the coming of a nuclear Iran holds special dangers and requires particularly urgent attention. There are four driving reasons.

Obama Veto of Keystone Pipeline Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Keystone XL pipeline veto

Experienced vote counters do not believe that either the House or the Senate will muster the two-thirds majority necessary to override President Obama’s veto of the Keystone XL pipeline bill. If so, Mr. Obama’s years of delay and disingenuousness on this issue, culminating in his veto, will guarantee negative consequences for America long into the future.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu gestures while addressing the 2015 American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference in Washington, Monday, March 2, 2015. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Standing with Israel

A world leader giving an address to Congress shouldn’t be controversial, especially when that leader is the prime minister of a major U.S. ally — indeed, a bulwark of freedom in a deeply troubled region of the world.

Attendees vote in the CPAC 2015 Straw Poll at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Friday, Feb. 27, 2015, in National Harbor, Md. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

CPAC then and now

A conservative reflects on the annual confab.

Illustration on the progressive tax structure by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Do the rich pay their fair share?

Suppose there were a banquet for 100 people and at the end of the night it was time to split the bill of $50 per person. If that bill were paid for the way we pay our income taxes, here is how it would work. Those in the top half of income would pay roughly $97 each and those in the bottom half of the income would pay an average of $3 each. Almost 40 people would pay nothing. And the single richest person in the room would cough up $1,750.

Illustration on the state of American liberty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

CPAC, freedom and saving the country

Attendees of last week’s Conservative Political Action Committee (CPAC), the nation’s largest conference for conservatives, heard a few tried and true conservative messages from potential presidential candidates and activists alike — calls for lower taxes, more freedom for business, a strong national defense, the importance of killing the enemy and the need for a serious foreign policy.

Illustration on continuing political and existential threats to Israel by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Much ado about the wrong Israeli controversy

The brouhaha over Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s March 3 speech to Congress is diverting attention from more important U.S.-Israel controversies that will escalate soon after this comparatively minor contretemps fizzles out.

Illustration on patent protection by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Patent ‘reform’ is killing the right to invent

With the best intentions, and naively going along with the corporate world’s hugely financed publicity machine, Congress is about to stomp on America’s most creative citizens, its inventors.

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Phyllis Schlafly Portrait Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Applauding an elegant conservative

Recently, I was temporarily placed on the Southern Poverty Law Center's watch list for extremism simply because I vocally support traditional marriage. I remember thinking: When did advocating for lifelong love between one man and one woman become a hate crime? Fortunately, the group saw the folly of its ways and apologized, removing me from the list.

The Wizard of Oz meets King Lear

When it comes to presidents, the brightest are not necessarily the best. There are at least three other qualities that matter as much or more: temperament, judgment and character. The presidential greatness of men like Washington, Lincoln, FDR and Ronald Reagan was due at least as much to these qualities as it was to raw intellect.

President Obama. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Respecting neither character nor Constitution

Not long ago, American presidents waged bitter fights with their political opponents in Congress, and in the end arrived at a civil compromise. President Obama consistently shows that he lacks the skill set, work ethic, political courage or humility to follow the path of his predecessors.

Republican governors are blaming President Barack Obama for a budget standoff that threatens a potential Department of Homeland Security shutdown. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The villain of the shutdown

Mitch McConnell is desperately seeking a way out of the corner he painted for himself. The Republican leader of the Senate promised the public two things last November. He said there would be "no government shutdown on my watch," and that he would use the appropriations lever to force President Obama to "move to the center" on several crucial issues, including immigration.

Vladimir Putin            Cartoon by Herb, Dagningen, Lillehammer, Norway/CartoonArts International

Vladimir Putin’s rule book

Last week, two Russian long-range bombers skirted the southwest coast of England. British Typhoon warplanes scrambled from their base to "escort" the bombers away. Prime Minister David Cameron accused Moscow of "trying to make some sort a point."

Rudolph W. Giuliani

Poll: 62 percent of Republican voters don't believe President Obama 'loves' America

- The Washington Times

Analysts, critics and pundits continue to wonder if President Obama "loves" America, a question recently suggested by former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani. Here comes the poll, this a Rasmussen Reports survey of 800 voters released Tuesday. Fifty one percent of the respondents disagree with the idea. But there are those who don't. "Voters overwhelmingly say they love this country, but one-out-of-three doesn't believe President Obama feels that way," the poll states.

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. (Associated Press)

Obama’s signature gift for Iran

President Obama yearns for a "signature" accomplishment overseas to match his signature domestic achievement as the presidential legacy he leaves on Jan. 20, 2017. He's racing toward a nuclear deal with Iran that would give him a foreign disaster to match the domestic disaster called Obamacare.

Condemn Bahrain's policies

S. Rob Sobhani's recent claim that the King of Bahrain is adhering to good governance and consequently boosting U.S. interests in the region could not be further from the truth ("Bahrain, an island of stability amid Mideast chaos," Web, Feb. 12).

Illegal immigrants sit in a group after being detained by U.S. Border Patrol agents in McAllen, Texas. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Black History Month betrayal

Throughout Black History Month, the top issue on the White House agenda has been granting deportation amnesty to illegal immigrants.

An Oscar statue is seen as preparations are made for the 87th Academy Awards in Los Angeles, Saturday, Feb. 21, 2015. The Academy Awards will be held at the Dolby Theatre on Sunday, Feb. 22. (Photo by Matt Sayles/Invision/AP)

Academy Awards audience down 16 percent - the lowest ratings in six years

- The Washington Times

Viewer turnout was tepid for the 87th Academy Awards despite the fact that host Neil Patrick Harris sang, joked and shed his clothes as a surprise side show. The early ratings, in fact, were the lowest in six years. Nielsen reports that 36.6 million viewers tuned in to see the big doings. Last year, 43.7 million did the same - this is a substantial 16 percent drop.

Lawyer and former New York City Mayor Rudy Giuliani comments on a lawsuit filed against video game giant Activision by former Panamanian dictator Manuel Noriega outside Los Angeles Superior court in Los Angeles Thursday, Oct. 16, 2014. Noriega claims his likeness was used without permission in "Call of Duty: Black Ops II" and he was portrayed as a murderer and enemy of the state. Activision attorneys said allowing the case to proceed would make it difficult to include historical figures in games, books and other creative works. Los Angeles Superior Court Judge William F. Fahey did not signal during an hour long hearing Thursday how he might rule. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

Love, American style

Rudolph W. Giuliani, the former mayor of New York City, is taking some heat — and winning praise in some quarters — for remarks he made at a private dinner last week at which he questioned President Obama's love for America.

World burns as Obama fiddles

The Islamic State and other radical terrorist groups are beheading, crucifying, raping and burning alive human beings in Libya, Syria, Iraq, Yemen and other places. Terrorists are also shooting and killing in America, France, England, Norway and elsewhere. While this is happening, what is President Obama doing with the greatest military machine the world has ever seen? Nothing. Nada. He plays golf, vacations, raises campaign money while the world burns. Nero was nothing compared with Mr. Obama. What is going on is analogous to what happened prior to World War II. Adolf Hitler was moving in Europe while people such as Lord Chamberlain wanted only peace at any price. Chamberlain went to Munich, met with Hitler, signed a peace agreement (followed by his infamous "Peace for our time" speech), which appeased Hitler and guaranteed the war that killed 50 million to 60 million people.

Illustration on the meaning of "Love of Country" by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

To love or not to love America

When former New York Mayor Rudolph W. Giuliani said he "does not believe the president loves America," he taught all the Republican presidential contenders a powerful political lesson in style and substance.

A woman wearing a mask to protect herself from pollutants walks on a pedestrian bridge as buildings at Beijing's Central Business District (Associated Press)

The clean air force

Air is essential — a couple of minutes without it is proof enough — and clean air is the best kind. While we're breathing, most of us prefer that the air we inhale is clean. The air in much of China, for example, is so foul there's a growing business for taking tourists to Taipei or Manila on what are called "breathing tours."

Only one Islam

Clifford May's Feb. 17 op-ed, "The ideology whose name presidents dare not speak," joins the hundreds of other bells ringing the truth about Islam. Mr. May writes, "Anxious not to give offense to peace-loving Muslims, we've refused to identify — much less seriously examine — the ideology of bellicose Muslims, those waging what they call a jihad against infidels." This is a partly true remark. History tells a different story, one that shows Islam to be just what the "radical Islamists" are showing the world today.

A bill by Rep. Matt Salmon, Arizona Republican, would amend the Food and Nutrition Act of 2008 to require a member or representative of a household that receives such benefits to show photographic identification at grocery stores when using a food stamp electronic benefits transfer card, or debit card. (Associated Press)

Charity by fraud

Food stamp fraud is a scandal that should give every taxpayer, Democrat, Republican or rogue of no particular partisan persuasion, a severe case of indigestion. Rep. Matt Salmon, Arizona Republican, wants to take a bite out of it.

Illustration on the merits of a non-college education by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hail to the college dropouts

At one time in American history, "Go West, young man" described the idea that the frontier was the place to build a new life. For the past few decades, we've settled instead for the far less pioneering "Go to college, young man." Not nearly as exciting, is it?