Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

GOP Talent Pool Fading Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The disappearing governors

The Iowa caucuses may have only muddied the waters in the presidential race, but they almost definitively decided one thing: the next president will not be a governor. That’s an amazing revelation because just one year ago all the smart money was betting that the next president would be a Republican governor.

Illustration on U.S. development of reusable rockets by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A dangerous partnership with Russia

It is with a terrible sense of deja vu that I find myself again warning American lawmakers about our reliance on Russian rocket engines to loft military satellites. For more than a decade, America’s workhorse rocket, the United Launch Alliance’s (ULA) Atlas V, has been powered with RD-180 engines imported from Russia.

Comparing Abortion to the Holocaust Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How abortion dehumanizes everyone

Over 50 years ago, Adolf Eichmann, the architect of Nazi Germany’s machinery of death, was executed by hanging after his 1961 conviction by an Israeli court.

FILE - In this July 9, 2015 file photo, a Wall Street sign is seen near the New York Stock Exchange in New York. U.S. stocks moved lower on the last day of the year as the market headed for a sluggish end to 2015. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Who is best to reform Wall Street?

In order to reform the financial industry, the next President needs to understand what the fixes should be or risk an overreaction that makes the excesses worse.

Arrogant Iranian Actions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iranian arrogance

Iran’s recent capture of two U.S. Navy 47-foot Riverine Command Boats (RCBs) that were on a routine transit from Kuwait to Bahrain on January 12 is another example of the arrogance and contempt Iran holds for America and our political leadership.

Illustration on deporting persons who have overstayed their visas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A fresh approach to the immigration conundrum

Our broken immigration system has been bad for the country and a source of political division for well over a decade. Some want a so-called “comprehensive” solution to the crisis, but the prospects for it actually happening (let alone being a solution) are not good amid our divisions. It’s time to rise above the existing gridlock and build a national consensus based on national security.

Illustration on the costs of green energy by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Unearthing an all-of-the-above energy approach

Last month in his final State of the Union Address, President Obama abandoned his belief in an “all-of-the-above” approach to energy policy — one that blends the use of emerging and established energy resources for the American people and the American economy.

Crisis in Civic Education Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

College ignorance and the threat to liberty

Media outlets around the country have reported that 10 percent of college graduates think Judith Sheindlin — better known as TV’s “Judge Judy” — is a member of the U.S. Supreme Court. Behind this embarrassing yet hilarious finding is the fact that there is a serious crisis in American higher education.

Illustration on the West's failure to take Muslim culture seriously by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Islamist wears Dolce & Gabbana

In the “culture” section of the venerable Atlantic magazine last month, there was a news item I wouldn’t want you to miss: “The Italian fashion house Dolce & Gabbana has just launched a line of hijabs (headscarves) and abayas (cloaks) in the label’s signature playful, theatrical aesthetic.”

Related Articles

Illustration on increasing sophistication in automation and its impact on employment by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An outlook of meager growth

The U.S. economy is likely to dodge a recession but good jobs will remain hard to find.

In this Jan. 29, 2016, photo, Republican presidential candidate, former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush speaks during a campaign event at Greasewood Flats Ranch in Carroll, Iowa. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

And now, here comes New Hampshire

- The Washington Times

The wind and snow of Iowa gives way to the ice and slush of New Hampshire, and the long, long trail to sunny South Carolina has never looked so inviting to so many. No one could have survived these last weeks but for the ample supply of hot air from the candidates to raise the temperature to barely tolerable.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Operation Thunderbolt: Flight 139 and the Raide on Entebbe Airport'

Since the horrific events of Sept. 11, 2001, it has been fashionable in some circles to express nostalgia for the good old days of hijacking back in the 1970s. It is certainly true that nothing back then was even remotely comparable to Sept. 11, where the vicious destruction and sheer number of lives lost both in aircraft and on the ground would have seemed inconceivable in what were more innocent times in such matters.

Gov. Bill Clinton on "The Arsenio Hall Show" June 3, 1992.

The United States of Trump

In the beginning there was a combative media. Dating back to Colonial America, as Eric Burns has chronicled in his book, "Infamous Scribblers," politicians and journalists have mostly had a love (for Democrats)-hate (for Republicans) relationship. It is television and the advent of the celebrity culture -- from TMZ to "Entertainment Tonight," to now even broadcast news -- that has taken the process to new depths.

Illustration on decreasing economic freedom in the U.S. by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

America's declining economic freedom

When you think of the United States as being free, what comes to mind? The ability to speak your mind? To vote? To live and work where you please? Good answers, but there's another kind of liberty that's easily overlooked, although it affects nearly everything we do.

Chart to accompany Moore article of Feb. 1, 2016

Judging the tax plans

With the first real votes being cast in the presidential race on Monday, this is an opportune moment to do some last-minute comparison shopping on the candidate tax reform plans. On this issue there's a lot to cheer about. All the Republican candidates have crafted plans that would slash tax rates for everyone and most would vastly simplify the thousands of pages of IRS tax code too.

Abbas no partner for peace

Thank you for your editorial "The Obama legacy" (Web, Jan. 21), which notes the Palestinian terror campaign of stabbings, car rammings and shootings that has killed 25 Israelis, an Eritrean, an American and a Palestinian, and observes that although there is "no evidence of central direction from the Palestinian leadership ... they are clearly the result of a vicious campaign of hatred and pleas to spill Jewish blood."

Memo to Mabus: Butt out

Will the Obama administration's need to undermine tradition and efficiency in the United States never be satisfied? Now Navy Secretary Ray Mabus, whose own military background amounts to a very brief Navy enlistment, has decided that he knows more about managing the U.S. Marine Corps than the men who have dedicated their lives to just that ("Liberal Democrat slams 'ridiculous' Navy chief for forcing female integration on Marines," Web, Jan. 12).

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves after speaking during a campaign stop on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016, in Gilbert, S.C. (AP Photo/Rainier Ehrhardt)

Now to the real show

Soon the voters in Iowa will get a little relief from the invasion of candidates, their handlers, and the tsunami of reporters, pundits and assorted wise men who have trudged through snow and ice to make sure that no burp of the body politic goes unheard or unremarked. Iowans will get their state back, and to relish once more the silence of the cornfields.

Migrant children Nor, Saleh and Hajaj Fatema from Syria sleep outside the Swedish Migration Board, in Marsta, Sweden. Interior Minister Anders Ygeman says Sweden could deport between 60,000 and 80,000 asylum-seekers in coming years. (Jessica Gow/TT News Agency via AP, File)

Scandinavia learns a hard lesson

The rewards of pride and piety have suddenly expired in Scandinavia. The northern democracies, accustomed to dispensing unwanted tutelage in sanctimony, have canceled their welcome for the wave of migrants from the Middle East and North Africa trying to break down the door to Europe.

Laws to Stop Coal Production Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

'Welcome Back Carter'

President Obama's plot to use the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) to kill federal coal mining with a thousand paper cuts is not the first time he has used NEPA to try to end energy development. Disturbingly, his scheme is a throwback to President Carter and a decade-long moratorium that ended only when President Reagan took office. Meanwhile millions of Americans, vast regions and the nation's economy will suffer.

Illustration on the expanding TSA by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Refocusing the TSA

The new Transportation Security Administration (TSA) administrator is saying and doing a lot of smart things. Among them, he stopped the practice of randomly placing unknown air travelers into abridged screening, calling it an "untenable risk." Smart. He has refocused his agency on security after years of lax management and public pressure shifted its priority to traveler convenience.

The Value of One Life Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Martian family values

Holed up during the Blizzard of 2016, I was a grateful recipient of our DVD-collecting neighbor's brand new copy of the Matt Damon film "The Martian."

BOOK REVIEW: 'Thomas Jefferson and the Tripoli Pirates'

As a scholarly truism holds, "every generation rewrites history to suit itself," the same might be said for every historian, and every news anchor who wants to be one. Brian Kilmeade of "Fox and Friends" (with ghostwriter Don Yaeger), gave us "George Washington's Secret Six" and now has penned another look at our Republic's early years through a lens ground to his own prescription.

Former President George H.W. Bush visited the CIA on Friday to mark the 40th anniversary of his swearing in as the Agency's director in 1976. (CIA)

George H.W. Bush pays a call on the CIA

- The Washington Times

The CIA had a noteworthy visitor Friday. Former President George H.W. Bush returned to the agency's headquarters just outside the nation's capital to mark the 40th anniversary of his swearing-in as Director of Central Intelligence, and almost to the day. "He is credited with restoring focus and boosting morale in the institution, and he remains one of the most beloved Directors in the agency's history," the CIA stated in a historic overview.

Islamic Relief provides needed aid

The picture of Islamic Relief Worldwide painted by Kyle Shideler in "Funding terrorists must end" (Web, Nov. 29) is riddled with inaccuracies. It undermines the good name of an organization trusted by governments, U.N. agencies and hundreds of thousands of donors to deliver life-saving aid around the world.