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(Image courtesy of thestar.com).

Life’s a scream on the slippery slope

- The Washington Times

“The slippery slope” doesn’t frighten very many people in Washington because that’s where a lot of politicians live. Life can be comfortable there, and it’s usually quite profitable. But it’s a dangerous piece of real estate for the rest of us.

There’s good news about third-party candidates

The conventional wisdom is that an independent presidential bid by New York billionaire Donald Trump would harm the Republican candidate in 2016. That’s probably incorrect. Most often, significant independent general-election candidacies harm the incumbent or incumbent party more than they do the challenging party.

Illustration contrasting Reagan's dealings with the Soviets and Obama's with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Barack Obama, you’re no Ronald Reagan’

In a recent interview defending the proposed nuclear agreement with Iran, President Obama argued that that his approach to Iran is essentially the same as that which Ronald Reagan took toward the Soviet Union. Mr. Obama said that ” where I completely admire him was his recognition that [an agreement would be worth doing] if you were able to verify an agreement that you would negotiate with the evil empire that was hell-bent on our destruction and was a far greater existential threat to us than Iran will ever be.”

Illustration on Obama's undermining of the U.S. military by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Undermining the military

When President Obama announced that he was going to “fundamentally transform” America, not many Americans understood the full depth of that statement. Based on an assessment of his policies over the last six and half years, clearly one of Mr. Obama’s objectives has been to diminish America’s standing and leadership role throughout the world. One result has been that our allies now don’t trust us and our enemies don’t fear us — the worst possible combination.

President Johnson signs Medicare legislation July 30, 1965.                Associated Press photo

Medicare at age 50

Diehard defenders of President Obama’s continuing, wretched rollout of the Affordable Care Act may be quick to point out that other government programs, most notably Medicare, also had rocky starts. But the historical record doesn’t support such nonsense.

Illustration on courtesy, respect and rules in the U.S. Senate by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When tough talk roils the decorum of the Senate

The United States Senate has a long and justly celebrated tradition of comity and respect among members. Although there have been occasional exceptions throughout history, on the whole, senators have taken great care to treat each other with courtesy and respect, both in private discussions and in public deliberations.

Peace Through Strength Bunker Bomb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Reviving ‘peace through strength’

Ever since the Ayatollah Khomeini and his Islamist storm troops took over Iran in 1979, the driving force of the country’s rulers has been (1) destroy Israel; (2) establish Iran as the hegemonist of the Middle East; and (3) drive out all Western influences from the region. Their efforts to create a nuclear arsenal has been part of their strategy to accomplish these goals.

Illustration on the controversy stirred during the creation of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Surviving ‘a perfect storm’ of opposition

Just two months ago, the nation marked the 40th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, and many of the stories in the media were illustrated with images of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the Mall, which over the past three decades has become an American cultural icon — symbolizing that difficult period in our history. Yet, that memorial, as we know it today, almost didn’t happen.

Related Articles

Illustration on the faults of the Federal public works funding bill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forging a highway funding fiasco

Later this week the highway trust fund officially runs out of money unless Congress authorizes more funding for roads and bridges. But the bill that is being pushed by Democrats and some Republicans is starting to look like a Republican Party Dunkirk that could infuriate conservative voters and even wind up costing the GOP the 2016 election.

Making the case for Main Street

By its very definition, the word "justice" equates with rightfulness and justness of ground or reason. That's why the too-big-to-fail regulatory debate leaves me perplexed and concerned about the well being of this great nation.

Illustration on the Obama Iran nuclear arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Peace for our time'

Banner headlines in a prominent national newspaper read "NUKE DEAL PAVES WAY FOR NEW ERA: Sworn Foes U.S., Iran Aim To Bury Hatchet" — without sarcasm. For critics of the Iran nuclear deal, such undeserved praise is ominously reminiscent of the adulatory press that greeted British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain and his ill-fated Munich agreement, upon returning from meeting Adolph Hitler in Nazi Germany on the eve of World War II, declaring, "Peace for our time."

Joining military could save lives

The incarceration of thousands of black men in America should not be upstaged by the rash of killings of unarmed black people at the hands of law-enforcement officers across the country. Are there any real solutions to stopping the bloodshed and helping black families deal with the issues that stem from growing up in fatherless households? In short, yes.

Illustration on family factors affecting U.S. employment by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why aren't more Americans working?

Has America entered a "new normal" defined by lower economic growth and declining workforce participation? Some evidence may suggest that is the case, but a closer look reveals it is too soon to make that claim.

FILE - In this June 16, 2015, file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, , R-Ky., speaks to members of the media following the weekly Republican luncheon on Capitol Hill in Washington. McConnell said July 20 he hopes to announce soon that he and Sen. Barbara Boxer of California have reached an agreement on a transportation bill. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Working on the railroad

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell, whose rage at Democrats for the way they ran the Senate when they were the majority, is using some of their tactics to push a six-year highway bill through the Senate. Revisiting the highway funding debate must make senators believe they're caught in a remake of "Groundhog Day" because they've had to pass some 60 short-term extensions in recent years. Mr. McConnell wants to end that, pass a multiyear bill and move on.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Novel Habits of Happiness'

Isabel Dalhousie philosophizes the way some people drink. There is nothing that she won't contemplate, analyze or nitpick, from meerkats in the zoo to the difference between a good submarine (the crew doesn't swear or drink) and a bad submarine which of course must be nuclear.

Secretary of State John Kerry. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Facing the devil in the details

The details of President Obama's deal with Iran continue to leak, like muddy water from a bucket left to rust in the weeds. Several congressmen who lately called on the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in Vienna learned that there are secret "protocols" to the agreement Mr. Obama made with the mullahs of Tehran. Mr. Obama and the talking heads on television argue lamely that this is "always the way with such undertakings."

Illustration on the FDA labeling of Kratom as "dangerous" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An excuse for crushing kratom

Last year, Americans spent an estimated $374 billion on prescription drugs, up 13 percent from the year before. These drugs include OxyContin, Vicodin, Percocet and others that the federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for sale without regard to their potential for abuse.

Heavy Handed HUD Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Experimenting with failed socialism again

Remember busing, that brilliant social experiment that was to usher in a new era of racial utopia in America? Undaunted by the failed socialist experiments of the 1980s, the Obama administration has recently implemented a new Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) rule designed to "desegregate" housing by withholding funds from communities that fail to demonstrate their projects "affirmatively further" fair housing.

President Barack Obama speaks at the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution, in El Reno, Okla., Thursday, July 16, 2015. As part of a weeklong focus on inequities in the criminal justice system, the president will meet separately Thursday with law enforcement officials and nonviolent drug offenders who are paying their debt to society at the El Reno Federal Correctional Institution, a medium-security prison for male offenders near Oklahoma City. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The mullahs rub some noses in Obama's folly

- The Washington Times

The Iranians, having hornswoggled Barack Obama and John Kerry, are giddy with euphoria. Ordinarily the parties to an agreement would help each other sell it to the skeptical and the suspicious in their ranks, not least by keeping their traps shut. But not these guys.

More Planned Parenthood abhorrence

It's been a tough year for the conservative community in America. We've seen a dismaying Supreme Court decision on gay marriage, liberalization of marijuana laws and more. Yet in the past two weeks we have learned of an issue so revolting that it makes one nauseated: An anti-abortion group, the Center for Medical Progress (CMP), published a secretly taped video of a telling discussion with Deborah Nucatola, director of medical services for Planned Parenthood. In the video, Nucatola candidly discloses how the premier abortion organization sells aborted body parts "Covert video targets Planned Parenthood fetal-parts policy," Web, July 14).

Iran deal sacrifices Israel

Recently Secretary of State John Kerry issued a draconian proclamation in defense of the Iran deal. He warned that if Congress rejects the plan, "Our friends in this effort will desert us." The dreadful irony of this statement immediately arrested me.

Illustration on GOP's expanded campaigning on social media by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Cow bells, dog whistles and the Grand Old Party

The Republicans are desperately trying to get hip. Pursuing the latest new thing is not in the Republican DNA, but it's necessary to win elections. They have to tap into the popular culture of social media to woo the younger generation of voters, and that requires a digital strategy.