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Chart to accompany Moore article of Aug. 31, 2015

Oil, America’s inexhaustible resource

In August 1859 on the eve of the Civil War, Col. Edwin Laurentine Drake completed the first commercial oil well in the United States on Oil Creek just outside of Titusville, Pa.

Obump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Republican version of Obama

Americans may finally be tiring of “talking-point presidents.” For more than six-and-a-half years, this is what President Obama has been — telling Americans what they want to hear, while pursuing policies they do not support.

Illustration on China's menacing moves in the Pacific by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China’s challenge to U.S. Asia policy

Earlier this month, Secretary of State John Kerry met with his counterparts from across the Asia-Pacific region in Malaysia, discussing joint trade, security and political efforts.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks on the campus of Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Thursday, Aug. 27, 2015, during a 'Commit to Vote' grassroots organizing meeting. (AP Photo/David Richard)

A late apology in clintonspeak

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton attempted to “come clean” about her emails again, like a sinner squirming in the hands of an angry god, but the partisan gods do not seem to be appeased.

Illustration on government debasement of religious liberty by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Favoring some claims of conscience over others

We face a crisis of conscience today — a crisis forced upon us by elites in Washington who would pick and choose who is allowed to follow their deeply held beliefs and who is to be punished by the government for doing so.

Lower Taxes Boost the Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Swinging the tax ax

Ronald Reagan signed the historic Kemp-Roth tax cut into law on Aug. 21, 1981. Reagan’s tax cuts should be seen in the context of Abraham Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation.

Illustration on the Kellogg-Briand treaty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A treaty as hollow as the Iranian nuclear deal

It is ironic that Thursday marks the anniversary of the signing of the Kellogg-Briand treaty in Paris in 1928 designed to renunciate war as an instrument of national policy

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Jimmy Carter     Associated Press photo

Jimmy Carter's peace

When Ronald Reagan announced in November 1994 he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, even some of his most ardent political opponents paused to wish him well.

Vice President Joe Biden. (Associated Press)

Now the real fun is about to begin

- The Washington Times

This may be the most entertaining road show yet. Round and round the presidential campaign goes, and where it stops nobody knows. Even Mitt Romney is said to be thinking about jumping in again, no doubt figuring that some of Jeb's "investors," who are familiar indeed, may be looking for another place to place their bets.

Plentiful Wi-Fi Availability Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Easing the Wi-Fi spectrum crunch

The U.S. Small Business Administration and Census Bureau reports that there are more than 28 million small businesses that create over 90 percent of all new jobs in the nation.

'Welfare' abuse extends further up

Both "Boot camp, not benefits" and "When welfare beats work" (Web, Aug. 19) make good points: Welfare for the poor is expensive and too comfortable and it fosters mutual political dependence between recipients and government -- and of course, we need to do something about the whole thing.

This undated photo made available by Iberdrola Renewables LLC shows wind turbines on a corn and soybean farm in Trimont, Minn. The company will be building a similar commercial-scale wind energy farm near the coast community of Elizabeth City, N.C. (Iberdrola Renewables LLC via AP)

Obama's new clean energy giveaway

If Ronald Reagan were alive today, he would have turned to whoever was with him as President Obama finished his latest speech on climate change and "clean" energy and said, "Well, there he goes again."

End for Hillary?

Many of us on the far-right end of the dial have taken up chortling and raucous merriment in response to Hillary Clinton's plunging poll numbers, rising disapproval ratings and generally dismal summer ("Donald Trump gains ground as support for Hillary Clinton slips," Web, Aug. 19).

Do Americans still agree with "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses," as engraved on the Statue of Liberty? (National park Service)

Anchor babies and an adult dilemma

There's nothing new about anchor babies. Only the nomenclature has changed. With hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens pouring across the border over the past decades, many of them are looking for an anchor to keep them in place in the new world. A 6-pound baby might do it.

The Whig's 1836 Candidates Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Will 2016 reprise 1836?

With a crowd of candidates vying for the Republican presidential nomination in 2016, it brings to mind the election of 1836.

Advertising outreach for a new ammunition line meant to down invasive lightweight drones. (Snake River Shooting Products)

'Prepare for Drone Apocalypse': New ammo meant to protect privacy-- and down drones

- The Washington Times

Now ready for citizens concerned their privacy is at stake in an increasing drone-friendly culture: Snake River Shooting Products has just introduced Drone Munition shot shell based defense rounds. "Prepare for the Drone Apocalypse, the Idaho-based company warns in its first ad for the new product, which they describe as a "12 gauge 3-inch shot shell solution aimed at defending against drone-based privacy concerns and terror."

The real war on women

It must be admitted. There is a war on women. The Democrats have been screaming about this for years, and they should know. Because the war is their war on women all across the socioeconomic spectrum.

Chart to accompany Moore article of Aug. 24, 2105

'Why I can't get a mortgage'

Last month I bought a house in Potomac, Md., a trade up on my current home, and was shocked to learn in the ensuing weeks that I couldn't get a mortgage loan.

FILE- In this Aug. 6, 2015, file photo, President Barack Obama speaks in the South Court Auditorium in the Eisenhower Executive Office Building on the White House complex in Washington, Thursday. Obama and Hillary Rodham Clinton are expected to attend Vernon Jordan's 80th birthday party Saturday, Aug. 15, on the swanky Massachusetts island famous as a gathering spot for prominent Democratic figures.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

The administration meets reality

The markets and American technology are turning the Obama administration's original energy policies around by 180 degrees. There's still a lot to do, particularly by Congress, so long besotted with subsidies for certain powerful lobbies. But prospects are bullish.

Climate Change Scam Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Deceptive temperature record claims

The U.S. government is at it again, hyping meaningless records in a parameter that does not exist in order to frighten us about something that doesn't matter.

Democrats seek vote replacements

Democrats need black citizens as "customers" and a source of baby body parts for the abortion industry. They also need black men and women as voters, since 90-plus percent of black votes go to Democrats.

Illustration on disputed territorial claims between the ROC and Japan over the Daioyutai islands by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Diaoyutai Islands: ROC territory

On July 23, former Republic of China (ROC) President Lee Teng-hui, during a visit to Japan, publicly stated that "the Diaoyutai Islands belong to Japan, and are not Taiwanese territory." This statement contravenes historical facts, the ROC Constitution, and international law.