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Zoe Buck, a 14-month-old child, checks out an empty voting booth as at her mother, Julie Buck, votes at left, Tuesday Nov. 4, 2014, at the Alaska Zoo polling place in Anchorage, Alaska. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)

No Election Day for dummies

- The Washington Times

When President Obama was elected president in 2008 on a promise to “transform” America, most voters didn’t have a clue to what he meant, and he has transformed as much as he could get by with. He’s harder at work than ever. One of his baddest bad ideas is mandatory voting.

Illustration on the actual nature of marriage laws by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The wrong argument against traditional marriage

The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in a set of cases, including Obergefell v. Hodges on Tuesday, challenging state laws and constitutions that define marriage as the union of a man and a woman. One of the arguments made by those who wish to redefine marriage nationwide is that classifying same-sex couples differently from opposite-sex couples for purposes of civil marriage violates the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment.

A warning placard on a tank car carrying crude oil near a loading terminal in Trenton, N.D. North Dakota House budget writers have stripped funding for a state-run rail safety program.  The Public Service Commission had requested $972,000 in the next two-year budget cycle to fund the program that included two rail safety inspectors and a rail safety manager.  (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)

Freeing American crude

It’s rare to find a policy that combines bad economics with harmful national security overtones and, at the same time, violates U.S. obligations to the world trading system. But U.S. restrictions on crude oil exports are just that rare bird.

Illustration on Iran's acquisition of nuclear arms leading to further regional nuclear proliferation and instability by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fallout from a bad deal with Iran

Ever since Sept. 11, 2001, whenever Americans seem especially polarized over a controversial issue, you hear pundits recall how united we’d became in the aftermath of that vicious attack. Why, they ask, can’t we be like that again?

Illustration on media effluvia's negative impact on America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Another signpost on the road to destruction

When future historians analyze the decline of America, they need look no further than the trivialities increasingly occupying our time and concerns instead of substantive matters seriously threatening our existence.

Lessons from a happy place

What is the happiest place? Last week in its annual “World Happiness Report,” the United Nations reported that Switzerland was No. 1. The United States ranked No. 15, and the African country of Togo came in last, at number 158.

Liberals and magical thinking

We all know that children think magically, and naturally inhabit a world of fantasy and imagination. It’s the perfect place to be when you’re a kid. The problem is, adults on the left seem to have decided they deserve to live in that same magical world, where facts and logic and reason just don’t exist.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's achievements by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary’s foreign policy ‘achievements’

Hillary Clinton announced her candidacy for president and the Earth did not move. This wasn’t exactly a surprise since the bench in the Democratic Party isn’t deep. Her brief for doing so is based on the claim she is a woman who cares about the middle class. Of course, this is an odd construction since she had little experience as a member of this class.

Illustration on the actual state of planet Earth contradicting environmental alarmists by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

State of the planet: It’s better than ever

There is no time in the history of mankind that would be a better time to be alive than today. Nearly every objective measure of the state of the planet and the state of human progress shows vast improvement over time. You can find proof of this in about 30 seconds on your iPhone, a computing powerhouse that places the world at your fingertips.

Illustration on innovative campaigning for the GOP in 2016 by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Campaigning on the future, not the past

When the 45th president of the United States of America is sworn into office on Jan. 20, 2017, it will be a moment to rejoice and reflect upon how one person reached the highest office in the land. To get there, the newly elected president would have been forced to make difficult decisions, which led to winning his (or her) party’s nomination for president.

Jan Palmer, a biology teacher at Central High School in Aberdeen, S.D., top right, leads her Advanced Placement/Rising Scholars biology class through a practice test. (AP Photo/Aberdeen American News, Kevin Bennett, File)

The ‘fix’ is in for AP courses

When controversy erupted a year ago about the lack of balance in the College Board’s new AP U.S. History (APUSH) Framework, the College Board initially dug in its heels and stubbornly defended the new course. But the tone has changed.

Greece's Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras makes his way to welcome visiting Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiadis in Athens, on Friday, April 17, 2015. Anastasiadis is on a one-day official visit to Greece.   (AP Photo/Yorgos Karahalis)

Europe’s long-running struggle over Greece’s debt

After three days of Washington meetings recently, world financial officials of the International Monetary Fund dealt with Greece’s massive debt problem with stern warnings about the necessity for the nation to overhaul its near-crashed economy.

Related Articles

Illustration on Hillary and money questions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary's hurdles

Nearly four months into the two-year presidential election cycle, Hillary Clinton is running into deep trouble on several major political fronts.

Don't elect based on labels

For a period of many decades, the political class and the mainstream press has pushed onto the public the theory of identity politics, the belief that a person's race, ethnicity, gender, creed, sexual orientation and ideology qualifies him or her to be an effective leader, politician or political candidate. This theory, with some exceptions, has proved at times not to comport with reality. Examples are legion, even in the present time. However, entities continue to push this theory to the detriment of what is real.

Anti-fracking crowd's last gasp

The article "Fracking boom creates jobs for women — but only as prostitutes and maids, activist claims" (Web, April 20) was well-written and demonstrates how out of touch anti-fracking activists have become.

Iran, Obama real threats to U.S.

According to President Obama, enabling Iran to continue to enrich uranium and thus progress toward a nuclear warhead is fine, because the greatest threat facing life on our planet is unchecked climate change ("Obama: U.S. must secure global climate-change deal 'before it's too late,'" Web, April 18). This does not represent logical thinking, but is an extension of an earlier claim by Mr. Obama that climate change is no longer a theory; it is established scientific fact.

Illustration on the adverse impact of five years of Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shreds of doubt about Obamacare

Last week's tax-filing deadline was a little bit more complicated than in the past, thanks to Obamacare.

Wind mills work atop the mesa near Sterling City, Texas. (AP Photo/LM Otero, File)

Financing Climate Crisis, Inc.

The Obama administration is using climate change to "fundamentally transform" America. It plans to make the climate crisis industry so enormous that no one will be able to dismantle it, even as computer models and disaster claims totally lose credibility — and even if Republicans control Congress and the White House after 2016.

Bill de Blasio     Associated Press photo

De Blasio ready for - 2016? New York City mayor pops up on presidential hopefuls list

- The Washington Times

Some have wondered if Hillary Clinton was a "place holder" for a mystery Democratic candidate who would materialize in 2016. Others question the dearth of Democrats on the presidential hopefuls list, when the Republican Party boasts around 20. Well here's something. A "Draft de Blasio movement" is now percolating, and it arrives following the New York City’s mayor trip to Iowa only last week.

George Washington   From a portrait by Gilbert Stuart

The body politic grows soft and fat

- The Washington Times

The Founding Fathers tried to warn us about runaway partisan outrage, but they didn't listen to themselves. We've been paying for it ever since. Now there's not much we can do about it.

The Washington Times celebrates the U.S. Constitution 227 years after ratification. (VIDEO screenshot) ** FILE **

Recovering ‘Our Lost Constitution’

Finding Americans fed up with governmental abuses isn't hard. They wonder why we have politicians who spend too much, bureaucrats who regulate too much, and officials who limit our freedom at almost every turn.

Obama befriending communists

President Obama is getting quite chummy with Raul Castro, the president of Cuba. Cuba is the only communist country in this hemisphere. Apparently Mr. Obama needs to be told that Raul Castro is the brother of Fidel Castro, the man who allied himself with the Russians to nuke the United States.

Reconsider 'Lives Matter' slogans

It's time to praise the police and stop the mindless, politically correct protests and their Al Sharpton-style slogans, such as "Hands Up Don't Shoot," "Black Lives Matter" and more recently "All Lives Matter."

Illustration on the IMF's chronic misunderstanding the causes of economic growth by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hammering global growth with faulty monetary policy

This past week, the International Monetary Fund again lowered its global economic forecast for 2015. From 2003 to 2007, real global growth in gross domestic product averaged more than 5 percent, but during the last five years it has averaged less than 3 percent. During the last six years of both the Reagan and Clinton administrations, real GDP growth averaged more than 4 percent in the United States, but growth has averaged only a little over 2 percent since the recession bottomed out in 2009.

Illustration on failed civics education in the nation's schools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Flunking civics means apathy reigns

It's an old joke, but one that is a commentary on our times. A pollster asks: "What do you think about the level of ignorance and apathy in the country?" The person replies: "I don't know and I don't care."

FILE - In this April 4, 2015, file photo, from video provided by Attorney L. Chris Stewart representing the family of Walter Lamer Scott, Scott appears to be running away from City Patrolman Michael Thomas Slager, right, in North Charleston, S.C. Slager was charged with murder on Tuesday, April 7, hours after law enforcement officials viewed the dramatic video that appears to show him shooting a fleeing Scott several times in the back. (AP Photo/Courtesy of L. Chris Stewart, File)

Race and police brutality

Police brutality is real, and there are bad cops among the good. Police brutality and police misbehavior must be swiftly and firmly punished when and where it occurs. A star on a policeman's breast confers responsibility along with authority.

Retiring Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid, Nevada Democrat, has long opposed a nuclear waste site at Yucca Mountain, said it is "not something I will ever accept."

Bury the death tax

The House of Representatives approved legislation last week to abolish the death tax, and the vote was not close — 240 to 179. Democrats joined Republicans for the first vote on the death tax in nearly a decade. This is an issue that must come up every year until the tax is killed permanently and decisively until it is graveyard dead.