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Liberties Lost Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The presumption of liberty

In the years following the adoption of the Constitution, before he was secretary of state under President Thomas Jefferson and then president himself, James Madison, who wrote the Constitution, was a member of the House of Representatives.

Illustration on reality and memory in Germany on the 25th anniversary of the fall of the Berlin Wall by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Berlin Wall, back to the future

Americans groove on the exhilaration of argument and accusation as the midterm elections finally approach, but here in Germany, there’s the bitter remembrance of what it was like to have none of the above.

Illustration on the standards and limitations of the national Core Curriculum by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Assessing Common Core: Con

Common Core is bad for students, and it’s bad for teachers, parents and state and local autonomy. It is a federal intrusion and all-encompassing leviathan that legally should not be allowed to stand.

Gov. Bill Haslam speaks at an economic development announcement in Cookville, Tenn., on Monday, Aug. 25, 2014. The Republican governor shrugged off a letter from state Rep. Rick Womick who had called it "treasonous" for a political action committee run by Haslam supporters to target GOP lawmakers who opposed the adminstration on Common Core education standards. (AP Photo/Erik Schelzig)

Assessing Common Core: Pro

As states have begun to implement Common Core State Standards in earnest, controversy around the initiative has swelled.

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev. speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, June 17, 2014, after a Democratic caucus meeting.  President Barack Obama will meet with Congressional leaders at the White House on Wednesday to discuss the turmoil in Iraq. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Voters know who to blame for their woes

Americans go to the polls on Nov. 4 to cast their votes in a midterm election that’s shaping up to be an angry outcry over the disastrous direction of the country.

Corrupt Foreign Policy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s phony foreign-aid reform

Four years ago, President Obama promised in a United Nations speech to “change the way we do business” with foreign aid and “seek partners who want to build their own capacity to provide for their people.” However, Mr. Obama, like numerous prior presidents, is more devoted to boosting aid spending than to fixing its flaws.

Related Articles

This undated handout image provided by Gehry Partners, LLP shows an aerial perspective of Eisenhower Square looking along Maryland Avenue, SW and Independence Avenue in Washington. A key arts panel has approved a revised design for a memorial to honor President Dwight D. Eisenhower in Washington, which could clear the way for groundbreaking. The U.S. Commission of Fine Arts voted Thursday, Oct. 16 to approve Frank Gehry's design. A federal planning agency also recently approved the design. (AP Photo/Gehry Partners, LLP)

Building Ike’s memorial

The history of Washington's memorial wars proves that the Eisenhower Memorial will ultimately be built.

This undated file image shows the website for updated HealthCare,gov, a federal government website managed by the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Service. HealthCare.gov, the online portal for health insurance under President Barack Obama’s health care law, has been revamped as its second enrollment season approaches. And other major provisions of the Affordable Care Act are taking effect for the first time. A look at website and program changes for consumers and taxpayers: Old: 76 screens to muddle through in insurance application. New: 16 screens _ for the basic application that most new customers will use. But about a third of those new customers are expected to have more complicated cases, and how they’ll fare remains to be seen.  (AP Photo/file)

The facts behind Obamacare's numbers

"Is the Affordable Care Act Working?" reads a recent headline in The New York Times. The editors then consider a series of questions, the first of which is pretty basic: "Has the percentage of uninsured people been reduced?"

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Moor's Account'

One of the easiest ways to rewrite history is to resort to fiction. Thousands of readers who couldn't be bothered with musty maps, journals and memoirs are always on the lookout for a good historical novel.

Image: White House

Obama choreographed hug with Ebola victim

- The Washington Times

President Obama is usually "not interested in photo ops," but apparently he made an exception for Friday's good news that Nina Pham, the first Dallas nurse who contracted Ebola, is now virus-free.

FILE - In this July 15, 2014, file photo, Camel cigarettes, a Reynolds American brand, are arranged for a photo in Philadelphia. The nation's second-biggest tobacco company informed employees Wednesday, Oct. 22, that beginning next year, the use of traditional cigarettes, cigars or pipes will no longer be permitted at employee desks or offices, conference rooms, hallways and elevators. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

EDITORIAL: Tobacco neo-Prohibitionists at the U.N.

The world, or a good part of it, struggles to cope with Ebola, and the United Nations continues to be obsessed by tobacco. The World Health Organization, meeting in Moscow, came up with a treaty imposing a global tax on cigarettes and delegates of 179 nations signed it.

Defining Terrorism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Terrorism defies definition

Defining terrorism has practical implications because formally certifying an act of violence as terrorist has important consequences in U.S. law.

FILE - In this Thursday, Sept. 25, 2014 file photo, Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi addresses business leaders as he launches his "Make in India" initiative, prior to his scheduled departure to the U.S. in New Delhi, India. After months of criticism for not moving aggressively enough on promises of an economic overhaul, Modi, who led his Bharatiya Janata Party to a landslide election win in May, announced a string of policies designed to kick-start Asia's third-largest economy. Over the past week, Modi has unveiled an overhaul of India's archaic labor laws, freed diesel prices from state control and signed an executive order promising to open India's coal industry to private companies. Modi,  on promises that he would re-energize India's stumbling economy, faced a flurry of criticism after his July budget failed to provide new direction.  (AP Photo/Saurabh Das, File)

EDITORIAL: Capitalism's new fans

Capitalism, as a wise man who understood human frailty once said, is a bad economic system. Its only virtue is that it is better than all the other systems. Nevertheless, it has fallen from favor in Washington among those who don't understand human frailty.

Connecting the Dots to Despotism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Connecting the dots to despotism

Recently, I wrote a column suggesting that we are living in an age of insanity. Events since show the madness morphing into soft despotism, which may harden into outright tyranny.

Illustration on Democrat race baiting by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Race-baiting down the homestretch

Desperate times call for desperate measures, and with the possibility of Republicans gaining control of the Senate in the upcoming midterm elections, the left is resorting to jaw-droppingly despicable race-baiting tactics.

Filtering WiFi at Coffee Shops Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Internet pornography pandemic

In her recent interview with Vanity Fair, actress Jennifer Lawrence addresses her emotions following the widely publicized hack of her and several other actresses' iCloud accounts, in which privately taken nude photographs were posted on the Internet, saying, "It's not a scandal; it is a sex crime."