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White House aide Sidney Blumenthal, shown in this video image, says during his Feb. 3, 1999, deposition that President Clinton lied to him. The videotape was part of House Manager Rep. James Rogan's, D-Calif., presentation in the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton, Saturday, Feb. 6, 1999, in Washington. (AP Photo/APTN)

Flying as close to the flame as Hillary dares

- The Washington Times

Everything about the Clintons, both Hillary and Bubba, is a lie, including (to steal a memorable line from the author Mary McCarthy) the “a,” the “and,” and the “the.” Neither Bubba nor Hillary know how to tell the truth, but both of them are masters at spinning the lie.

Bloody Hand of ISIS in the Mideast Illustration by M Ryder

ISIS attacks on the West

The May 3 assault on a Muhammad cartoon contest in Garland, Texas, prompted much discussion about the assailants’ connections to the Islamic State, also know as ISIS, ISIL and Daesh. Did ISIS run them as agents? Are they part of a new network of terror in the West?

Illustration about the abuse of Sixth Amendment rights in misdemeanor cases by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Shining a light on 10 million criminal prosecutions

Adding to the growing momentum in Congress for bipartisan criminal justice reform, last week the Senate Judiciary Committee held a first-of-its-kind hearing to shine much-needed light on pervasive — and largely unexamined — problems in the largest segment of our criminal justice system. Republican Chairman Chuck Grassley of Iowa heard expert testimony describing widespread violations around the country of the Sixth Amendment right to legal counsel for Americans charged with misdemeanors.

Bringing Children into the World Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Are embryos persons or property?

Much of the media has ridiculed businessman Nick Loeb, the former fiance of actress Sofia Vergara, the star of the sitcom “Modern Family,” because he filed a lawsuit to prevent Ms. Vergara from destroying the frozen embryos they created together in 2013. But many in the pro-life community have rallied behind him, viewing the embryos that were created by Mr. Loeb and Ms. Vergara as persons deserving protection by the state.

**FILE** The sign for the National Labor Relations Board is seen outside the organization's headquarters in downtown Washington on July 17, 2013. (Associated Press)

Labor board overreach

Last month, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), stacked with Democratic appointees loyal to Big Labor, enacted new procedures to govern unionization elections.

Reform of the Criminal Justice System Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A ‘safety valve’ for mandatory minimum sentences

In the waning days of Maryland’s legislative session, casual observers were probably surprised to see a freshman, conservative Republican from Western Maryland leading the fight on the Senate floor to reform our state’s harsh mandatory minimum laws. In fact, I was joined by a majority of Republicans in the Senate in voting for this important reform.

Bill de Blasio     Associated Press photo

The false god of politics

Far-left politicians apparently believe that their philosophy is not receiving the worship it is due, despite a track record of failure.

Obama's economic legacy illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Omens from Obama’s crumbling economy

President Obama, looking for a legacy, may soon find himself running from one. Americans forgive few things less than a poor economic performance, and Mr. Obama has presided over one throughout his presidency. However, as 2015’s first-quarter results show a stalled economy that threatens to go into reverse, Mr. Obama could finally feel the fallout — not owing to just today’s economy, but his entire presidency’s.

Illustration on Justice Ginsburg's bias in the pending decision on homosexual marriage     The Washington Times

Partial to gay marriage

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is not an impartial jurist — not when it comes to the same-sex “marriage” cases, at least. Everyone knows it. Instead of giving confidence to the American public by being above reproach while the same-sex “marriage” cases are being considered, Justice Ginsburg is going out of her way to embarrass the court with unethical antics aimed at assuring pro-same-sex “marriage” supporters and humiliating opponents.

Martin O'Malley speaks with reporters during a roundtable interview at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Jan. 16, 2015. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

When Hillary gets an unexpected spanking

- The Washington Times

The Democrats can run, to paraphrase Muhammad Ali’s rebuke of a timid opponent, but they can’t hide. Hillary Clinton is turning her campaign into a game of hide-and-seek, and the party is terrified. Some leading Democrats are beginning to say out loud what they have said privately for weeks.

A puzzling national defense illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Re-establishing a consensus on national defense

From al Qaeda to the Islamic State, we have learned to kill enemy leaders but not much else about basic issues of war and peace. Just last week, the media diverted attention from the scandals of Our Lady of Perpetual Ambition Hillary Rodham Clinton by asking Jeb Bush some really hard questions. Would he have done the Iraq War the same way as his brother — or at all?

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Sunday, May 17, 2015.  Kerry was meeting Sunday with Chinese President Xi before heading to South Korea to complete a short Asian tour that has been clouded so far by concerns over China's construction in South China Sea. (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Pool Photo via AP)

A challenge to Chinese targeting of American firms

To supplement profits that have been hamstrung by slowing domestic growth, Western companies are turning to emerging markets with greater frequency. Participation in those markets, however, is not without risk; businesses face challenges ranging from corruption to unfair regulations and a host of other issues.

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Jimmy Stewart in the 1939 political movie by Frank Capra,  "Mr. Smith Goes to Washington" (Image from Columbia Pictures, Inc)

82% of voters say ordinary citizens should run for office, not lawyers and professional politicians

- The Washington Times

Mr. Ordinary goes to Washington? Americans still dream that some sensible, honest patriot will surface in the heartland, then run for office and rescue the nation. The numbers: 82 percent of U.S. voters say the nation needs to recruit more "ordinary citizens to run for office rather than professional politicians and lawyers" -- this according to a new Fox News poll. That includes 84 percent of Republicans, 90 percent of independents and 76 percent of Democrats.

A wrong way to fix failing schools

Last week at the National Summit on Youth Violence Prevention organized by the Department of Education, the Department of Justice and other various federal agencies, Secretary of Education Secretary Arne Duncan did what leftist bureaucrats have done throughout history: announce the dream of supplanting parents with the state by taking control of children "24/7."

In this aerial photo taken May 13, 2015, emergency personnel work at the scene of a deadly train wreck in Philadelphia. Amtrak faces what probably will be a $200 million payout to crash victims _ the cap established by Congress nearly 20 years ago as part of a compromise to rescue the railroad from financial ruin. It would be the first time that the liability ceiling, considered by many to be too low to cover the costs of the eight lives lost and 200 people injured, designed for Amtrak actually would apply to the railroad.  (AP Photo/Patrick Semansky)

All aboard for more arguments

Before the wreckage of the fatal crash in Philadelphia was cleared, the politicians in Washington began to fight over the damaged carcass of Amtrak, the troubled national passenger railroad.

FILE - This Oct. 20, 2014 file photo shows George Stephanopoulos at the 24th Annual Broadcasting and Cable Hall of Fame Awards in New York. Stephanopoulos has apologized for not notifying his employer and viewers about two contributions totaling $50,000 that he made to the Clinton Foundation. ABC's news division said Thursday, May 15, 2015, that "we stand behind him." The donations, made in two installments in 2013 and 2014 and first reported in Politico, were made because of Stephanopoulos' interest in the foundation's work on global AIDS prevention and deforestation, he said. (Photo by Evan Agostini/Invision/AP, File)

The $75,000 question

Contrary to what they sometimes think of themselves, neither journalists nor intelligence agents are 10 feet tall. They're usually intelligent, well spoken and often have sharp skills at what they do. But not always. Sometimes the best of them blunder at what they do best. Two examples are currently contributing to the buzz of the chattering class.

This image made from video provided by NASA shows part of the International Space Station with the Earth in the background on Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015. (AP Photo/NASA)

A new Little Ice Age?

President Obama continues to prophesy "dangerous" global warming, due to fossil fuels. Computer modelers conjure up crisis scenarios based on their assumption that carbon dioxide drives climate change.

Better funding for D.C. traditional schools illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How D.C. shortchanges public charter school students

As a parent, I believe in the original rallying cry for public charter schools in the District of Columbia -- "parental choice." Charters are publicly funded, but run independently of the traditional public school system; they were intended to extend choice to every parent regardless of income because, like the school system, charters are tuition-free public schools. But despite the government's responsibility to fund the education of all its public school students fairly, the choices and voices of the 45 percent of parents who have selected charters in the District are being disrespected.

Illustration on the need to effectively broadcast American values to the world by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Rediscovering America's voice

Ideas matter. They matter so much that they cause seismic shifts in history. Extremist ideas foster revolutionary fanatics so beholden to ideology that attempting to contain them can be like placing a Band-Aid on an open wound. Sept. 11 upended previous notions of deterrence; you can't simply deter someone who intentionally dies for a cause. You also have to counter the ideology that leads him to devalue his own life and the lives of innocent others.

Illustration on the mythological impact of federal assistance on poverty by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama's poverty mythology

Our class warrior in chief was at it again this week complaining about our "ideological divides that have prevented us from making progress" in solving problems like poverty. Just when you thought you'd heard it all. Our most ideological president perhaps ever is arguing that there is too much ideology in Washington. Wow. Apparently, an ideology is a firmly held belief that is held by other people -- especially those on the right.

Justice is blind

I have followed China's brutal one-child policy from its inception in 1979. Living in China at the time, I saw how poor village women were being arrested, detained and tortured -- forced to undergo sterilizations and even abortions -- all in the name of controlling population growth. I left China with their cries for help ringing in my ears.

Discomfort not same as hatred

Isn't life uncanny? A report by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign looking into the topic of "microaggressions" found that the simple task of "walking into or sitting in" a room full of white people can be "problematic for minorities" ("Rooms filled with white people cause 'microaggressions' for minorities: study," Web, May 13).

Justice Department destroys state sovereignty illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

An appeal on behalf of Robert F. McDonnell

The federal government should not put a person in prison for doing something that even trained lawyers do not know is illegal. Yet that is precisely what the Department of Justice is trying to do by prosecuting former Virginia Gov. Robert F. McDonnell. In order to prosecute McDonnell for his admittedly poor judgment, the Justice Department invented an unprecedented construction of the vague federal corruption laws that would -- if applied consistently -- mean that every politician who trades his time for meals, campaign contributions or complimentary travel is also a felon.

Dialogue on human rights overdue

How ironic that Secretary of State John Kerry meets with Russian President Putin in Sochi, Russia — but there is no discussion of Mr. Putin's alliance with or supply of weapons to Iran. Isn't this in direct opposition to U.S. safety? Doesn't it threaten our allies as well?

A rhino, one of the world's most endangered species due to illegal poaching for its horn. (World Wildlife Fund)

$60K a pound: Illegal rhino horn now declared more valuable than gold, diamonds and cocaine

- The Washington Times

Could a human hankering for exotic elixirs, curatives and aphrodesiacs turn rhino horn into a $20 billion a year industry and take out an entire species of animals at the same time? Looks like it. A UCLA study from team of international scientists says so - saying the call for substances derived from animal parts has "drastic implications" for rhinoceroses, along with elephants, hippopotamuses and even gorillas.

Gen. Dwight D. Eisenhower, leader of Allied forces in World War II,was one of the few 'political outsiders' who made it to the White House. (Associated Press)

Only four in 200 years: Political outsiders have 'very thin record of success' in White House bid

- The Washington Times

What with Ben Carson and Carly Fiorina already knee-deep in their presidential bids, some wonder what the chances are for non-politicians who pursue the presidency. History has not been kind. "In short, aside from a handful of war heroes, presidential candidates who have never previously held political office have a very thin record of success," reports Eric Ostermeier, a University of Minnesota political professor.

Republican presidential hopeful Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida is calling for increasing military spending and for the U.S. to aggressively confront Russia, China and others that he says threaten the nation's economic interests. (Associated Press)

Marco Rubio fires an impressive opening shot

- The Washington Times

No presidential campaign guru ever posted a sign in headquarters warning the warriors that "it's foreign policy, Stupid." Americans are so pleased to be where they are they have little interest in what's going on anywhere else. Americans had zero interest in the gathering storm in the Pacific on Dec. 6, 1941, and on Sept. 10, 2001, nobody gave the Muslims, angry or otherwise, a second (or even third) thought.

Illustration on the impact minimum wage increases will have on entry level jobs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The importance of landing that first job

Customers at the new San Francisco McDonald's on Sutter Street are greeted not with a friendly smile but with the impersonal glare of two human-sized electronic tablets ready to take their order. Not coincidentally, San Francisco's minimum wage increased to $12.25 an hour earlier this month. The city has long had one of the highest wage floors in the country.