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Vice President Mike Pence, left, greets President Donald Trump as he steps off Air Force One as he arrives Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017, in Phoenix. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Laying waste to the party of Lincoln and Reagan

Isn’t it time the president stage an intervention to save Congress from itself? As leader of the Republican Party, the president has every right, even a duty, to intervene when it becomes clear his own party leadership is not only obstructing the will of the people, but is doing damage to the country.

Replacing patriotism with tribalism

Just after last week’s terrorist attack in Barcelona, a pro-Islamic State website posted video from the scene along with a message in Arabic saying, “Terror is filling the hearts of the Crusader in the Land of Andalusia.”

Trump's Baloney Detector Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Donald Trump’s baloney detector annoys his critics

President Trump is in trouble again with his moral superiors. His problem, of course, is that he cannot throttle his baloney detector. Mr. Trump, it seems, at some point in life acquired a baloney detector that has usually served him well. It certainly served him well during his long years in business and during his brief time in politics. Now, however, it is problematic.

Incentive to Save Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Living with low interest rates

No matter what President Trump and Congress do about taxes and the like, low interest rates are becoming as certain as aging. That’s good news for young folks buying homes but tough on retirees who rely on CDs and bonds, and people over 55 realigning portfolios for retirement.

Iran Turkey Rivalry Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iran versus Turkey, again

News that Iran’s and Turkey’s governments reached an accord on Idlib, a Syrian town now the focus of American interests, brings relations between the two of the largest and most influential states in the Middle East momentarily out of the shadows.

Women have a tea as workers march towards Plaza de Mayo, Buenos Aires, Argentina, Tuesday, Aug. 22, 2017. Thousands of union workers marched against the economic policies of President Mauricio Macri. (AP Photo/Victor R. Caivano)

Time for organized labor to end forced dues

Given the heated rhetoric that surrounds the right to work, you might believe that the concept threatens the very existence of unions. However, as a former union president I can assure you that the ability to collect fees from people who don’t want to join the union is not only unnecessary, but that ultimately it undermines union officials’ legitimacy when speaking for voluntary members.

Illustration comparing Trump's administration with Clinton's by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Not the first wounded presidency

Liberals predicting Donald Trump’s impending political demise should recall one of their own: Bill Clinton. Mr. Clinton already plumbed President Trump’s worst-case scenarios and survived. Even congressional Republicans, for whom a “Clinton reprise” is a bigger threat, have less to fear than liberals would like to believe.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau gives a speech at NATO headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, Thursday, May 25, 2017. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham) ** FILE **

Madness! Even the giraffes have gone crazy

- The Washington Times

We owe Chicken Little an apology. Maybe the sky really is falling. Evidence is everywhere. Cries and whimpers suddenly grow deafening as the landscape is dusted with snowflakes, who imagine they’re unique and have in common with other snowflakes only an extremely low melting point.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Aug. 22, 2017.

The price-level dilemma

Is more inflation desirable? Those at the Federal Reserve seem to think so, and they have explicitly said their target is 2 percent, or about double the current level.

Illustration on removing Confederate statues and monuments by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Historical hysteria

We will learn even less from history if we wipe it clean, as some are trying to do by removing statues of Confederate leaders whose beliefs about slavery and race most, including me, find offensive. Conversation beats censorship.

Illustration on anarchist and totalitarian strains in the leftist Antifa movement by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Old hatreds made new

Amid the chaos of Charlottesville, two specters from the previous century’s darkest hours have re-emerged. Alongside the well-publicized Nazi symbols on full display during the “Unite the Right” rally, so too were Communist hammers and sickles brandished by the opposing anti-fascist or “Antifa” protesters.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forgetting McConnell’s greatest achievement

Mitch McConnell has been taking quite a beating from President Trump for failing to get a health care reform bill through the Senate, but even Mr. Trump has largely conceded that John McCain, alone blew up the majority leader’s painstakingly crafted compromise.

Presidential Courage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

North Korea and fear

At the heart of the Cold War, the ever-present nuclear threat had a profound effect on the American psyche. Children hiding under desks during air raid drills during the 1960s and 1970s had longer-term implications in terms of mental and physical health as studies in the 1980s revealed.

Union Vote Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Union workers celebrate right-to-work laws

As summer temperatures continue in the 90s, August beachgoers aren’t the only ones feeling the heat. In Missouri, union employees are getting burned by efforts to block implementation of right-to-work.

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FILE - In this July 27, 2017 file photo, Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. is surrounded by reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington. Graham says President Donald Trump's comments about the violence in Charlottesville, Virginia, are dividing Americans instead of healing them.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Donald Trump lashes at Lindsey Graham's 'moral equivalency' quip

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump lashed back at Sen. Lindsey Graham in a tweet, calling out the South Carolinian for falsely portraying his remarks about racism and bigotry so that it seems he supports the KKK. Isn't it bad enough that Trump has to correct the media for misstatements all the time? Et tu, his own party?

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

Charlottesville and the loss of America's sanity

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump, bombarded in a speech on infrastructure with repetitive and aggressive questions about Charlottesville, made clear -- again -- that violence, bigotry and racism in all its many forms, in all its various shapes, were not to be tolerated. He dared to defend his initial Charlottesville comments, and for that, the mainstream media has determined, he must die.

Illustration on North Korea's backing down by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Armageddon postponed

North Korean dictator Kim Jong-un appears to have blinked and President Trump can claim a foreign policy victory and justification for his strategy.

Illustration of Paul Nitze     The Washington Times

The road not taken to nuclear disarmament

Why have so many been so shocked by this latest episode of brinkmanship over the threat of a nuclear war with the unhinged dictatorship in North Korea? It is worth remembering that we have had plenty of warning that such a horrific showdown was headed our way. Indeed, 18 years ago, America's leading authority on nuclear arms strategy explicitly laid out the stark risks that faced us unless we changed our ways.

Jihad Axis Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Resolving the Qatar crisis

Qatar's role in undermining the stability of the Sunni Islamic world is undisputed, and is on a par with that of Iran. Qatar has used the Doha-based Al Jazeera media network to conduct a propaganda war against its Sunni rivals, and also provided massive funding for terrorist militias to undercut its less-jihadist Sunni neighbors.

This June 23, 2015, file photo shows a carving depicting confederates Stonewall Jackson, Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis, in Stone Mountain, Ga. Democratic front-runner for governor Stacey Abrams posted several tweets Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, saying the carving at the tourist attraction Stone Mountain Park and other Confederate statues and monuments around the state should be removed. (AP Photo/John Bazemore, File)

Freedom for the speech we hate

Last weekend, serious violence broke out in Charlottesville, Virginia, when a group of white supremacist demonstrators was confronted by a group of folks who were there to condemn the message the demonstrators had come to advance. The message was critical of the government for removing a statue of Gen. Robert E. Lee from a public place.

Illustration on the challenges of setting standards for selective immigration policy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Immigration reform for a more prosperous America

America's immigration policy sorely needs modernization. By endorsing reforms offered by Sens. Tom Cotton and David Perdue, President Trump offers Congress an opportunity to better consider how new arrivals can contribute to national prosperity.

Real progress in regulatory reform

It's true. A full seven months after President Trump's inauguration and the convening of a new Congress, there is a sense of frustration that not enough has been accomplished. Hopefully, when Congress and the president get back to Washington in September, we'll see solid progress on measures to cut taxes and reform the tax code, and to replace Obamacare with a more market-oriented system. Not to mention passage of a budget and action on the debt ceiling.

Illustration on men and women in the workplace and attitudes on gender roles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scapegoats, dupes and gulls

Identity politics has gone over the top, and the flood of intolerance is drenching everyone. What began as a campaign to re-right injustice has created injustice. What was meant to change attitudes toward intolerance has become intolerance enthroned.

'It's easy to sit in comfortable chairs and criticize'

The subtitle of this passionate, well-intentioned book is key to why it makes me uneasy. One of the commonest errors a historian can make is to judge an institution or actions in the light of hindsight, which is bound to be distorting or even blinding.

In this Sept. 30, 2016, file photo, a marijuana bud is seen before harvesting at a rural area near Corvallis, Ore. (AP Photo/Andrew Selsky, File)

A pot hole in the culture

What's good for American children is good for America's future. A growing number of states are forgetting that -- if not in word, then in deed. The trend toward increasing legalization of marijuana is resulting in rising numbers of kids requiring medical treatment or hospitalization for narcotic intoxication.

Trump's revision rang hollow

In reviewing the stunning twists and turns of the Trump administration in the days following the atrocity that took place in Charlottesville, one recognizes that perhaps the most laughable pledge made by the president is that he would bring us together. Meanwhile he pours gasoline on our wounds and lights a match.

"He doesn't deserve to be treated this way," said President Trump of former Arizona County Sheriff Joe Arpaio. Mr. Arpaio was convicted in federal court earlier this year. (Associated Press)

A pardon for Sheriff Joe

President Trump is "seriously considering" pardoning Joe Arpaio, the Arizona sheriff who was convicted July 31 of misdemeanor contempt of court for ignoring a judge's order to quit detaining those he suspected of being illegal immigrants.

David Brock: Turncoat for profit

John R. Coyne's review of Sharyl Attkisson's book "The Smear" has flushed another fat rat from the larder of bogus news ("Taking a hard look at the practices and principles of major media," Web, Aug. 9). The recent political metamorphosis of David Brock, of that paragon of modern news Media Matters, is surely a sign of the times.