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Illustration on lower-cost tailored television choices by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

TV with a choice

Question: What do rabid football fans, working moms and Clifford the Big Red Dog viewers have in common?

Meaningful Tax Cut Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rand Paul’s ‘fair and flat’ tax proposal

Sen. Rand Paul’s flat tax plan is like a decent song in a world full of off-key voices. It hits all the right notes, including greater simplicity, lower rates for everyone, and a more competitive system of corporate taxation. But it has some small details that could use fine tuning.

Sen. Bernard Sanders, a Vermont independent who caucuses with the Democrats, is focusing on wealth disparity.

Bernie’s surge

If you Google Bernie Sanders, some surprising poll numbers will appear, showing the rumpled, self-described socialist gaining fast on Hillary Clinton in the race for the 2016 Democratic presidential nomination.

Illustration on the shifting meaning of marriage in modern society by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The same-sex factor in ‘freedom from marriage’

Ross Douthat of The New York Times produced what is perhaps the most penetrating piece on the Supreme Court’s ruling last week on gay marriage. He notes that, long before the debate on that subject gained traction in U.S. politics, gay intellectuals carried on their own debate about marriage and how the gay community should view that venerable human institution.

Illustration on the imposition of Common Core on U.S. schools by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ending Washington’s mandate on Common Core

The United States Senate will soon begin debate on a bill to get the federal government out of our local classrooms by permanently ending Washington’s mandate on Common Core.

Export-Import Bank Providing Corporate Welfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Shutter the Ex-Im Bank—for good

Reauthorizing Ex-Im would be a step backwards at the time when our economy needs to move forward.

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia gives the keynote speech at the Snake River Adjudication celebration dinner at the Boise Center on the Grove in Boise, Idaho, on Monday, August 25, 2014. (AP Photo/Otto Kitsinger)

Why gays ‘can’t get no satisfaction’

- The Washington Times

You might think the gays, the liberals and the mellowed-out folks who groove on kittens and little living things would be content to lie in a patch of sunlight in the corner and purr together.

Illustration on connections between Rolling Stone's reporter and the Departmwent of Education in the UVA "rape" case by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Education Department’s Rolling Stone reckoning

When one journalist (Chuck Ross of The Daily Caller) made a Freedom of Information Act request of the U.S. Department of Education about possible involvement of federal officials in the now-discredited Rolling Stone story, “A Rape on Campus,” the department sent him a box with a CD in it.

Illustration on Iran's "North Korean strategy" for developing nuclear weapons by Linas Garsys

It’s North Korea, all over again

We’ve seen this before. President Obama’s Iran nuclear deal looks increasingly like the disastrous deal the United States struck with the regime in North Korea. In 1994, the U.S. government signed a nuclear deal with North Korea that, according to then-President Clinton, would “make the United States, the Korean Peninsula and the world safer.” The agreement, we were told, did “not rely on trust,” but instead would involve a verification program that would stop the North Koreans from ever acquiring a nuclear bomb. Sound familiar?

Illustration on the value of the U.S. Constitution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘We the People’

“We the People.” We’ve heard that phrase so often it’s easy to overlook its significance. But as we mark our nation’s birthday, we should take a moment to ask ourselves: What is the role of the people?

The Washington Times. (Note: Ex-Im Bank does not directly finance military exports.)

Shut down the Export-Import Bank

Closing down the Ex-Im Bank is an important first step in the battle against the unhealthy marriage between the government and corporate America.

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What you don't know and should know about your family

Finding an enormous amount of money in what used to be your old home sounds like the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow. There is a graceful kickoff in the listing about a "1903 Queen Anne home -- graciously proportioned rooms and elegant millwork."

President Barack Obama pauses while speaking in the Rose Garden of the White House, Thursday, June 25, 2015, in Washington, about the Supreme Court upholding the subsidies for customers in states that do not operate their own exchanges under President Barack Obama's Affordable Care Act. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Peace, wouldn't it be wonderful?

We've got peace institutes, peace initiatives and even professors of peace. But the real thing remains elusive. We were told that would change with the election of "the peace president." A man of black and white parents, with one from the third world, would vanquish racial enmity, jealousy and envy. Such a man of vast intellect, steeped in enlightened liberalism, would end the wars imposed on a helpless world by American imperialism.

Chief Justice John Roberts speaks at the University of Nebraska Lincoln in Lincoln, Neb., in this Sept. 19, 2016, file photo. (AP Photo/Nati Harnik, File)

'Call this law SCOTUS-care'

Obamacare lives, through the manipulation of the law and abuse of the language by Chief Justice John G. Roberts. A sloppily written health care law is rescued by a sloppily reasoned opinion, with Mr. Roberts, author of the opinion, suggesting that the law ordinarily couldn't survive judicial examination, but enabling 6.4 million Americans to continue to get subsidies prohibited by the act seems nevertheless a nice thing for the court to do.

Recalling the thrill of a Broadway season past

One of my favorite remarks about state of legitimate theater occurred in the television classic "I Claudius." When Augustus Caesar inquired how things were in the theatrical world, a venerable actor replied that "the theater wasn't what it was." But the real zinger was when he added slyly: "And you know what? It never was what it was." Well, with all due homage to the general acuity of that remark, here is a book to tell us of a season on Broadway just over half a century ago that could absolutely justify anyone saying that the theater today really isn't what it was -- then.

Other factors determine violence

Karl Rove presented a popular, contra-factual, deceptive statement when saying, "the only way to guarantee that we will dramatically reduce acts of violence involving guns is to basically remove guns from society," thereby implying repeal of the Second Amendment was required. However, a study completed a few years ago and published in the Harvard Journal of Law an Public Policy found that within the United States and across European countries, violent criminality and suicide were unrelated and often inversely related to gun ownership.

Phillippee Couillard
By Asclepias (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

Is there an example in Canada?

Immigration continues to be the nation's most persistent headache. Everyone acknowledges it as Headache No. 1, but nobody has either the solution or even an effective headache powder. The masses keep crowding the border, and the politicians punt.

State workers take down a Confederate national flag on the grounds of the state Capitol, Wednesday, June 24, 2015, in Montgomery, Ala. Alabama Gov. Robert Bentley ordered Confederate flags taken down from a monument at the state Capitol. (AP Photo/Martin Swant)

America in the time of fever

The mob is loose. The debate about race that naive and sometimes well-meaning people say the nation needed has descended into an evitable burst of midsummer madness. The Confederate battle flag that is said to have driven a nut case to commit wholesale murder has become merely the backdrop of national lunacy. The millions quail at the sight of the Stars and Bars, a bit of cloth for all that. You would think Marse Robert at Appomattox surrendered too soon.

Illustration on the American lapse of memory concerning the Korean War by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'The Forgotten War' in Korea

June 25 marks the 65th anniversary of the start of the Korean War. Will the nation remember the war? It was not remembered on Memorial Day 2015. At the Memorial Day celebration on the National Mall in Washington D.C., there was not one reference to the Korean War. The "greatest generation" was seated on the stage. Vietnam veterans were called out. Wounded warriors of Iraq and Afghanistan were recognized. Letters were read. In Washington and in the Memorial Day ceremonies around the country, the Korean War did not exist.

Illustration on the pope's advocacy for belief in man-made global warming by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The pope, the globe and the facts

The media and the secular left have a love-hate relationship with the Roman Catholic Church and its popes. When the pope takes positions with which they agree, they applaud him, but when he takes positions with which they disagree, they either ignore or criticize him.

Flower Memorial Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The amazing grace in faith and grief

Nothing so moved so many in the aftermath of the Charleston massacre as the heartfelt expressions of grace and forgiveness for Dylann Roof by the families of the slain. Nothing so astonished the rest of us than the expressions of pity and pleas for mercy for the young man standing before the judge at his bond hearing.

Illustration on the wrongness of declaring government's "right" to free speech by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Protecting hatred preserves freedom

The tragedy of a mass murder in Charleston, South Carolina, last week, obviously motivated by racial hatred, has raised anew the issue of the lawfulness of the State expressing an opinion by flying a Confederate flag at the Statehouse, and the constitutionality of the use of the First Amendment to protect hate speech and hate groups. The State has no business expressing opinions on anything, and it is required to protect hate. Here is the law.

This image released by Netflix shows Kevin Spacey as U.S. Congressman Frank Underwood in a scene from the Netflix original series, "House of Cards." Spacey was nominated for a Golden Globe for best actor in a drama series for his role in the series on Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013.  The 71st annual Golden Globes will air on Sunday, Jan. 12.  (AP Photo/Netflix, Melinda Sue Gordon)

Kevin Spacey, Megyn Kelly join forces to produce The Resident - a new 'Beltway drama'

- The Washington Times

Kevin Spacey, Megyn Kelly. Could this pair have something in common? Yes, indeed. Mr. Spacey, the star and left-leaning producer of the Netflix blockbuster series "House of Cards" has joined forces with Ms. Kelly the Fox News anchor, and here's what they're up to. Mr. Spacey's Trigger Street production company has forged a deal with 20th Century Fox Television and Fox 21 Television Studios to produce "The Resident," deemed "a doozy" by The Hollywood Reporter, an industry source.

Flag removal would be insult

Like "political correctness," demanding the removal of the Confederate flag from the South Carolina capitol grounds is an attack on free speech "Lindsey Graham, Nikki Haley, Tim Scott call for removal of Confederate flag from S.C. capitol," Web, June 22).

Individuals, not things, kill

After any tragedy it has become the norm for society to place the blame on some aspect that they may have control over. In the case of the murders of nine black parishioners in South Carolina, the blame is being placed on the Confederate flag. It's as if many think that if the Confederate flag hadn't been around, this murderous act would not have happened.

FILE - In this April 11, 2015, file photo, US President Barack Obama, right, smiles as he looks over towards Cuban President Raul Castro, left, during their meeting at the Summit of the Americas in Panama City, Panama. On Decmeber 17, 2014, Presidents Barack Obama and Raul Castro stunned the world by announcing an end to their nations’ half-century of official hostility. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Saving the dictators

The Obama administration has been holding high-level talks with the Venezuelan dictatorship, this time in Haiti of all places, and that makes prudent men and women nervous. Washington's moral compass -- or whatever they're using for one at the White House -- has been spinning as if out of control, and pointing in odd directions.

FILE - In this May 26, 2015 file photo, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky. speaks in Elizabethtown Ky.  President Barack Obama's trade agenda appears to be back on track after an extraordinary bipartisan rescue operation mounted in the week since it was derailed in the House by rebellious Democrats backed by organized labor. "We are committed to ensuring both ... get votes in the House and Senate and are sent to the president for signature," House Speaker John Boehner and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell said in a joint statement issued Wednesday in an attempt to reassure pro-trade Democrats whose votes will be needed.  (AP Photo/Timothy D. Easley, File)

When enough is enough

When the legislation granting "fast track" authority to the president to negotiate a trans-Pacific trade agreement moved toward an initial Senate vote earlier this year, we warily urged Republicans to suck it up and vote for it. No president can negotiate a broad trade agreement without such authority. Anyone who thinks such agreements, properly negotiated and correctly written, aren't to the benefit of the United States understands neither economics nor history.

Less Inmates in the Slammer Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Who's behind bars?

The verdict is in, and it's close to unanimous: The United States has built too many prisons.