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This Sept. 5, 2014, photo by New York Times photographer Daniel Berehulak, part of a winning series,  shows James Dorbor, 8, suspected of being infected with Ebola, being carried by medical staff to an Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia. The boy, who was brought in by his father, lay outside the center for at least six hours before being seen.  Berehulak is the winner of the 2015 Pulitzer Prize for Feature Photography, announced Monday, April 20, 2015, at Columbia University in New York. (Daniel Berehulak, New York Times, Columbia University via AP)

A little good news about Ebola

- The Washington Times

The news from Africa and the Third World is seldom good, and much of the bad news is about disease born of ignorance, superstition and primitive sanitation, news dispatched by a media addicted to tales of unrelieved gloom, certain doom and inevitable disaster.

Unions Helped by Obama Appointees Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping workers in the dark

Two of Sen. Harry Reid’s controversial legislative maneuvers are coming back to haunt American workers. In 2013, then-Majority Leader Reid’s threat to eviscerate the judicial filibuster cowed enough Senate Republicans to approve Big Labor’s handpicked candidates to the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB). A few months later, Mr. Reid acted on his threat to gut the filibuster and installed three of President Obama’s nominees on the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals.

Missing world leader by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making the JV team of world leaders

British Prime Minister David Cameron’s recent stunning victory for his Conservative party catapulted him to one of the three top Western world leaders, alongside Germany’s Angela Merkel and France’s Francois Hollande. Mr. Cameron wasn’t supposed to win for numerous reasons, not the least of which because of his austerity policies and vigorous opposition from Labor and Liberal parties that thought a bigger government was the key to Britain’s growth.

Illustration on missing Muldovan bank funds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Who took Moldova’s millions — the crooks or the Kremlin?

On the eve of a national election in tiny Moldova last November, $450 million — equal to 10 percent of the Eastern European country’s entire annual gross domestic product — went missing. So far, no one knows where it went.

Export-Import Bank Providing Corporate Welfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Chamber of Corporate Welfare

Here’s a half-serious question: How much do taxpayers have to pay off Boeing to make the Export-Import Bank — finally and irrevocably — go away? If the feds wrote a check to Boeing for $100 million, would they then let the Ex-Im Bank die a merciful and long overdue death?

Illustration on the abuse of citizens' rights under current government surveillance laws by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A better Patriot Act

Critical parts of the USA Patriot Act are about to expire. The reauthorization bill moving through Congress, the USA Freedom Act, has sparked controversy on both sides of the political aisle and within the civil-libertarian community, rekindling debates that began more than a decade ago. Now is the chance to implement much-needed reforms, including reforms to a provision not expiring: the one authorizing National Security Letters (NSL).

Paying heed to the walking wounded

A few days ago I received a thank you note from an American soldier who has been struggling with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As with many victims of TBI and PTSD, it had taken him a while to realize the true nature of his injury and to seek professional help.

White House aide Sidney Blumenthal, shown in this video image, says during his Feb. 3, 1999, deposition that President Clinton lied to him. The videotape was part of House Manager Rep. James Rogan's, D-Calif., presentation in the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton, Saturday, Feb. 6, 1999, in Washington. (AP Photo/APTN)

Flying as close to the flame as Hillary dares

- The Washington Times

Everything about the Clintons, both Hillary and Bubba, is a lie, including (to steal a memorable line from the author Mary McCarthy) the “a,” the “and,” and the “the.” Neither Bubba nor Hillary know how to tell the truth, but both of them are masters at spinning the lie.

Bloody Hand of ISIS in the Mideast Illustration by M Ryder

ISIS attacks on the West

The May 3 assault on a Muhammad cartoon contest in Garland, Texas, prompted much discussion about the assailants’ connections to the Islamic State, also know as ISIS, ISIL and Daesh. Did ISIS run them as agents? Are they part of a new network of terror in the West?

Illustration about the abuse of Sixth Amendment rights in misdemeanor cases by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Shining a light on 10 million criminal prosecutions

Adding to the growing momentum in Congress for bipartisan criminal justice reform, last week the Senate Judiciary Committee held a first-of-its-kind hearing to shine much-needed light on pervasive — and largely unexamined — problems in the largest segment of our criminal justice system. Republican Chairman Chuck Grassley of Iowa heard expert testimony describing widespread violations around the country of the Sixth Amendment right to legal counsel for Americans charged with misdemeanors.

Bringing Children into the World Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Are embryos persons or property?

Much of the media has ridiculed businessman Nick Loeb, the former fiance of actress Sofia Vergara, the star of the sitcom “Modern Family,” because he filed a lawsuit to prevent Ms. Vergara from destroying the frozen embryos they created together in 2013. But many in the pro-life community have rallied behind him, viewing the embryos that were created by Mr. Loeb and Ms. Vergara as persons deserving protection by the state.

**FILE** The sign for the National Labor Relations Board is seen outside the organization's headquarters in downtown Washington on July 17, 2013. (Associated Press)

Labor board overreach

Last month, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), stacked with Democratic appointees loyal to Big Labor, enacted new procedures to govern unionization elections.

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Debunking the gun control myths with real voter polling

- The Washington Times

As president of the National Rifle Association during the days following the tragic school shootings in Newtown, Connecticut, I was on the front lines defending Second Amendment rights against President Barack Obama, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and a network of gun control advocates who used that tragedy to promote a gun control agenda that, had it been in place on Dec. 14, 2012, would not have prevented the tragedy.

Civilians flee their hometown of Ramadi, the capital of Iraq's Anbar province, 115 kilometers (70 miles) west of Baghdad, Monday, May 18, 2015. Islamic State militants searched door-to-door for policemen and pro-government fighters and threw bodies in the Euphrates River in a bloody purge Monday after capturing the strategic city of Ramadi, their biggest victory since overrunning much of northern and western Iraq last year. (AP Photo)

Disaster in Iraq

The Islamic State -- or ISIS, or Daesh, or whatever we're calling it this week -- has won a stunning victory with the collapse of the Iraqi army and the conquest of Ramadi and Anbar. The attempt by the Obama administration to spin it any other way is foolish. The loss is an enormous gain for the forces of radical Islamic terrorism.

The military had 2,837 active-duty chaplains as of December 2014  but recent high-profile cases of military chaplains facing punishment for private counseling sessions that reflected the teachings of their religion could cause devout Americans who are qualified for military service to think twice about joining the U.S. military. (Associated Press)

The lot of the atheist

The lot of an atheist true unbeliever is not a happy one. He is surrounded on all sides by believers, and he knows he's missing something. He must chip away at the beliefs of others to assuage his doubts and fears.

The summit that wasn't

I'd venture to guess that most of what you heard about President Obama's summit last week was wrong. To start, it wasn't a "summit." That term, coined by Winston Churchill, implies a meeting of heads of government. However, the most important Arab leader invited by Mr. Obama, King Salman of Saudi Arabia, stayed home, as did the rulers of the United Arab Emirates and Oman. King Hamad bin Isa al-Khalifa of Bahrain decided his time could be spent more productively at the Royal Windsor Horse Show outside London.

U.S. security hinges on Afghanistan

The Obama administration finally listened to our military leaders and are now planning to leave 9,800 troops in Afghanistan through 2016 and probably beyond ("Officials: US to keep more troops in Afghanistan into 2016," Web, March 16). Originally they were going to draw down to 5,500 troops.

The brothers who taught the world how to fly

At exactly 10:35 a.m. on Dec. 17, 1903, at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina, Orville Wright slipped the rope restraining the Flyer and started down the track. At the end of the track the Flyer lifted into the air.

Agenda of change -- in some things

Pope Francis has been getting considerable attention for his so-called agenda of change. In many ways it's quite refreshing to see a pontiff who is not afraid to break the mold. He has spoken passionately about globalization and his perception of how it has resulted in mass inequality. And even though I believe he's dead wrong on the causes (and more importantly the solutions), I respect what he's attempting to do as a spiritual leader.

Illustration on Justice Ginsburg's bias in the pending decision on homosexual marriage     The Washington Times

Partial to gay marriage

Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is not an impartial jurist -- not when it comes to the same-sex "marriage" cases, at least. Everyone knows it. Instead of giving confidence to the American public by being above reproach while the same-sex "marriage" cases are being considered, Justice Ginsburg is going out of her way to embarrass the court with unethical antics aimed at assuring pro-same-sex "marriage" supporters and humiliating opponents.

Obama's economic legacy illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Omens from Obama's crumbling economy

President Obama, looking for a legacy, may soon find himself running from one. Americans forgive few things less than a poor economic performance, and Mr. Obama has presided over one throughout his presidency. However, as 2015's first-quarter results show a stalled economy that threatens to go into reverse, Mr. Obama could finally feel the fallout -- not owing to just today's economy, but his entire presidency's.

Martin O'Malley speaks with reporters during a roundtable interview at the Maryland State House in Annapolis, Jan. 16, 2015. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

When Hillary gets an unexpected spanking

- The Washington Times

The Democrats can run, to paraphrase Muhammad Ali's rebuke of a timid opponent, but they can't hide. Hillary Clinton is turning her campaign into a game of hide-and-seek, and the party is terrified. Some leading Democrats are beginning to say out loud what they have said privately for weeks.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, left, shakes hands with Chinese President Xi Jinping at the Great Hall of the People at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Sunday, May 17, 2015.  Kerry was meeting Sunday with Chinese President Xi before heading to South Korea to complete a short Asian tour that has been clouded so far by concerns over China's construction in South China Sea. (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Pool Photo via AP)

A challenge to Chinese targeting of American firms

To supplement profits that have been hamstrung by slowing domestic growth, Western companies are turning to emerging markets with greater frequency. Participation in those markets, however, is not without risk; businesses face challenges ranging from corruption to unfair regulations and a host of other issues.

Don't buy what Democrats selling

The ways in which President Obama and the current crop of presidential contenders handle the media can serve as a metaphor for how the two parties govern once in power. Republicans favor fewer regulations and freer markets. When it comes to handling the press, GOP candidates take questions from anyone, including Democratic partisans masquerading as objective journalists.

The spying sins of the father

Of the American intelligence and military officers who spied for the Soviet Union and successor Russia, who deserves the most scorn for odious conduct? Topping any list would be Aldrich Ames of the CIA, whose treachery cost the lives of sources working for the United States, followed closely by Robert Hanssen of the FBI, who gave the KGB the bureau's "game plan" for tracking spies.

Amtrak is no way to run a railroad

If taxpayers suddenly stopped subsidizing Amtrak, what do you think would happen? Before trying to answer that question, it is useful to review U.S. railroad history. The first railroads were built in the United States in the late 1820s, and by 1900, only 70 years later, almost every town in the country had rail access. Railroads were high tech, the Internet of their time. The system was built and profitably operated by private companies.

A puzzling national defense illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Re-establishing a consensus on national defense

From al Qaeda to the Islamic State, we have learned to kill enemy leaders but not much else about basic issues of war and peace. Just last week, the media diverted attention from the scandals of Our Lady of Perpetual Ambition Hillary Rodham Clinton by asking Jeb Bush some really hard questions. Would he have done the Iraq War the same way as his brother -- or at all?

Illustration on the damage done by cutting education programs by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Giving kids a chance to succeed

It's hard to say which is more galling: when politicians want to extend the life of a program that doesn't work, or when they want to pull the plug on one that does.