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President Obama arrives to speak during a nationally televised address from the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jim Bourg, Pool)

Obama puts the cat among the pigeons

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama put the cat among the pigeons Thursday night, but he may be surprised by how big that cat could get, and with it a big cat’s appetite for more than pigeons.

Illustration on the Constitution and marriage by Linas Garys/The Washington Times

Considering the thorny question of a marriage amendment

At a time when many Republicans have embraced a “don’t ask, don’t tell” approach to same-sex marriage (“Don’t ask me what my position is because I won’t tell you”), Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas has proposed a characteristically audacious solution to judicial assaults on traditional marriage: a constitutional amendment.

In this photo taken May 12, 2014, Shon DeArmon, top, and his partner James Porter carry a flag in support of the county issuing marriage licenses for same-sex couples at the Pulaski County Courthouse in Little Rock, Ark.  A 2004 amendment to the Arkansas constitution lands before two courts Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014, with the state Supreme Court and a federal judge considering separate challenges in the case. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston)

A constitutional amendment on marriage

Our nation is in the final stages of a sweeping and historic social transformation that just 10 years ago seemed improbable at best.

Gruber's Black-box Obamacare Number Cruncher Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Gruber and the shenanigans of Leviathan

Democratic politicians and the liberal media are scrambling to curtail the damage from Obamacare architect Jonathan Gruber’s proclamations on stupid voters and deceitful legislative tactics.

Illustration on the need for immigration reform by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Solving immigration, one step at a time

Republicans have no shortage of ideas for fixing America’s immigration system and no lack of good will toward those who would come here for opportunity and freedom. What we do need, urgently, is to restore the bonds of trust — between the people and their government, and between the institutions we depend on to maintain the rule of law.

Playing with constitutional fire

Earlier this week, President Obama made it clear that he will soon offer some form of limited amnesty to about five million foreign nationals who are currently living illegally in the United States. He will do so by issuing an executive order to federal officials who oversee immigration directing them to undertake a course of action that, if complied with individually by all persons whom he designates as eligible, will cause the federal government to remove the threat of deportation from those who meet the standards he will lay down.

CAL THOMAS: Teaching hate

The Jerusalem terror attack is yet another example that the Islamists are playing to win; we aren’t.

Illustration on future Democratic legislation being written in Latin by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A modest proposal to left-wing friends

I have a suggestion for my left-wing Democratic friends in light of all the controversy over Obamacare. That the controversy continues all these years after the bill’s passage and that today much of the bill is in danger of amputation must be very dispiriting to those left-wingers who had such high hopes for it.

Illustration on campus sexual policies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Misreading the cry of rape

- The Washington Times

If Aesop were here he might rewrite his famous fable, replacing the boy who cried “wolf!” with the girl who cried “rape!” The cry of “rape” is used so carelessly that it’s often impossible to get to the truth of an accusation. When rape was a capital offense it was a rare and vicious crime which required a court of law to apply justice. It was underreported, since the rapist usually took advantage of those who felt too vulnerable even to say anything about it.

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BOOK REVIEW: 'Rebel Yell'

For two years, 1861 to 1863, Gen. Thomas Jonathan ("Stonewall") Jackson, West Point graduate, hero of the Mexican war, and in the interim a quirky eccentric former Virginia Military Institute professor plagued by a host of 19th-century afflictions, became not just a hero of the Confederacy, but a brilliant military tactician who out-thought, out-anticipated, outmaneuvered and outfought the enemy.

Sen. Barry Goldwater, Arizona Republican, announces his candidacy for the U.S. presidency in Phoenix on Jan. 3, 1964.

The man who ignited a revolution

Who was Barry Goldwater, universally known as "Mr. Conservative," and how did his '64 presidential campaign ignite a conservative revolution?

President Ronald Reagan, right, greets Sen. Barry Goldwater, R-Ariz., in the Rose Garden at the White House during a ceremony to start National Partiotism Week in Washington, D.C., Tuesday, Feb. 17, 1981.  (AP Photo/Charles Tasnadi)

'You and I have a rendezvous with destiny'

Excerpts from the speech delivered by Ronald Reagan on Oct. 27, 1964, in support of Barry Goldwater's candidacy for president. It affectionately has become known as "The Speech" and is widely credited for catapulting Mr. Reagan and his vision for conservatism onto the national stage.

Sen. Barry Goldwater rallied a new conservative generation during his presidential campaign in 1964. Although he lost that contest, his landmark philosophies of conservatism still echo a half-century later. As Goldwater's son, Barry Goldwater Jr., reminds us, conservatives must present positive answers to national problems, not just condemn them. (Associated Press)

The father of American conservatism

A half-century ago, Sen. Barry Goldwater strode to the podium of the Republican National Convention in San Francisco to accept his party's presidential nomination. He declared, "Extremism in the defense of liberty is no vise." Let me remind you further: "Moderation in the pursuit of justice is no virtue."

Illustration on government abuse of civil forfeiture laws by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The menace of civil forfeiture

Whether your metric is the stonewalling and misleading of congressional investigations or the racially discriminatory enforcement of civil rights laws in violation of the Constitution's equal-protection principles, the Obama Justice Department is the most politicized in the nation's history.

A demonstration for Arizona Sen. Barry Goldwater (right) is held on the final night of the Republican National Convention in San Francisco on July 16, 1964. Goldwater lost his presidential bid to incumbent Lyndon B. Johnson, who ascended to the presidency in 1963 following President John F. Kennedy's assassination. (Associated Press)

Goldwater's 'The Conscience of a Conservative' transformed American politics

Barry Goldwater's little 115-page book, "The Conscience of a Conservative," was published in 1960, long before running for president had occurred to the senator from Arizona, or much of anybody else. But Goldwater was already the undisputed champion of conservative ideas and policies in the Senate, and had traveled thousands of miles making speeches, campaigning for aspiring congressmen and senators, and raising money for the Republican cause.

Illustration on the real results of Obama's so-called immigration reform by Linas Garsys/The WAshington Times

Unfaithfully executing the law

President Obama is soon expected to issue an executive order that would make it possible for some illegal immigrants to live and work in this country without the threat of deportation, in effect granting amnesty to up to 5 million people.

Barry Goldwater waves to delegates inside the Cow Palace at the 1964 Republican National Convention in San Francisco. As a senator, he strongly argued that it is a core American value and in the country's best interest to stand by Taiwan as it faced an existential threat from tyrannical communists. Goldwater's contribution to the U.S.-Taiwan relationship made him a figure of enormous importance and won him profound respect on the other side of the Pacific. He championed the passage of the Taiwan Relations Act (TRA), a landmark piece of legislation, which through bipartisan support, was signed into law in April 1979. To this day, that law provides the bedrock for U.S.-Taiwan relations. (Associated Press)

Goldwater: Unwavering friend of 'Free China'

Barry Goldwater is rightfully an icon of the American conservative movement for decades since the 1960s, and it is a privilege and an honor to contribute to his remembrance on the 50th anniversary of his presidential campaign. What many Americans may not know, however, is the role then-Sen. Goldwater played in the U.S. relations with my country, the Republic of China (ROC, Taiwan), usually termed by the senator as "Free China." His contribution to the U.S.-Taiwan relationship made him a figure of enormous importance and won him profound respect on the other side of the Pacific as well.

Barry Goldwater in 1965. (AP Photo)

In the beginning there was Goldwater

- The Washington Times

In a very real sense, the modern conservative political movement began with Barry Goldwater. Had it not been for the Arizona senator it might have taken years or even decades for conservative ideas to break into the political mainstream, Ronald Reagan would be remembered today not as one of our greatest presidents, but as a "B" movie star and television host, and many of those who since the 1960s shaped our nation's politics would not have had an opportunity to do so.

Sen. Barry Goldwater, then the GOP presidential nominee, and his vice presidential running mate, Rep. William E. Miller of New York, appear together on Capitol Hill, Aug. 14, 1964. In the fall election, the Conservative Party took the lead in promoting Goldwater after word went out that the state GOP was not to lift a finger for its presidential nominee. Although Goldwater lost New York by nearly 3 million votes on Election Day in 1964, he had a lasting impact on the state's fledgling conservative movement. (Associated Press)

1964 'Go with Goldwater' rally bore fruit in the Reagan presidency

Back in 1964, "conservative" was a dirty word in New York Republican circles. The party was under the thumb of the original RINO (Republican in name only) Gov. Nelson A. Rockefeller, who believed he was destined to be elected president in 1964.

Citizens hold signs at the Westminster Board of Health meeting on the proposed tobacco ban, at the Westminster Elementary School, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014, in Westminster, Ma. A public meeting on a central Massachusetts town's proposed first-in-the-nation ban on tobacco and nicotine sales ended early Wednesday because officials say the crowd was getting too unruly to continue. (AP Photo/Worcester Telegram & Gazette, Steve Lanava)

EDITORIAL: Anti-smoking fanaticism

Prohibition is back in Westminster, a rural town of about 8,000 near the New Hampshire border in north-central Massachusetts. The town's three-member board of health said it would prohibit the sale of all tobacco products within the town's borders.

Barry Goldwater greets an Indianapolis crowd during a campaign tour in Oct. 1964. (AP Photo

Good for a story, and good for the conscience

- The Washington Times

Barry Goldwater was the favorite candidate of every correspondent who appreciated a good story. I covered his 1964 presidential campaign for the old National Observer, the late, great Dow Jones newsweekly, and he never let us down. He was blunt, irreverent and unpredictable, often mocking the press caricature of him as a reckless gunslinger from the Old West. He was great copy.