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EDITORIAL: Why militarize the schools?

But peer pressure, bullying and ambition for good grades aren’t the sort of minefield California’s schools apparently fear most. They’re getting ready for the real thing, deploying mine-resistant vehicles, or MRAPs, against the day an invading army lays a booby trap on the playground.

Illustration on the difficult U.S. position vs. the Islamic State by Kevin Kreneck/Tribune Content Agency

Creeping toward war, confused and unprepared

In their testimony before Congress, Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey said unequivocally that we are at war with the Islamic State (aka ISIS) in both Iraq and Syria.

The home of Ana Maria and John Conley is pictured in Arvada, Colo., on Thursday, July 3, 2014, is where their daughter Shannon Maureen Conley, 19, lived until her arrest by the FBI in April. FBI agents tried more than once to discourage  Conley, who said she was intent on waging jihad in the Middle East before arresting her in April as she boarded a flight she hoped would ultimately get her to Syria, court documents unsealed Wednesday show.(AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)

The spread of Rocky Mountain jihad

In my adopted home state, the toxic fumes of Islamic jihad have penetrated the most unlikely hamlets and hinterlands.

**FILE** Sen. Orrin Hatch, Utah Republican, addresses a crowd during the Utah Republican Party nominating convention, in Sandy, Utah, on April 26, 2014. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: The monument man, by executive order

The federal government already owns most of the land in Utah, and Mr. Obama has his eye on a prime parcel of 1.4 million acres near the Canyonlands National Park. With a wave of his autopen, he can banish development, declaring the Greater Canyonlands a “national monument.”

Illustration on "late speaker" children by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When children are late-talkers

Anyone who knows what anxiety, and sometimes anguish, parents go through when they have a child who is still not talking at age two, three or even four, can appreciate what a blessing it can be to have someone who can tell them what to do — and what not to do.

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President Obama said Wednesday he had authorized U.S. airstrikes inside Syria for the first time, along with expanded strikes in Iraq, as part of "a steady, relentless effort" to root out Islamic State extremists. (AP Photo/Saul Loeb, Pool)

Support Obama’s new ISIS plan

After watching President Obama's intense ISIS speech Wednesday night, and reading the text several times, I think the president basically — finally — got it right.

China Seas Chess Game Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Checkmate China

China is mounting a direct attack on the "freedom of the seas" concept, which has been the cornerstone of our maritime strategy for more than 238 years.

Illustration on Obama's fecklessness in war by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Playing a president on TV

"Good evening, my fellow Americans. My name is Barack Obama. I'm not really a wartime president but I play one on TV."

Illustration on the effects of cigarette taxation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Lessons from Eric Garner's death and cigarette taxes

Much has been written about the July death of Eric Garner, the 43-year-old black man who died after a New York City police officer put him in a chokehold during an arrest.

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From left, Sens. Thomas R. Carper of Delaware, Evan Bayh of Indiana and Blanche Lincoln of Arkansas are among the members of the newly formed Moderate Dems Working Group. The group of 15 will meet to focus on legislative battles, such as the president's $3.6 trillion budget proposal.

EDITORIAL: A 51st-state fantasy

Senate Democrats who are anxious about their re-election prospects in November are puzzled that Sen. Thomas R. Carper of Delaware, a Democrat, is pushing the fantasy of statehood for the District of Columbia so close to the November elections.

Vintage sheet music cover page of The Star Spangled Banner

How the national anthem came to be

No American historic document has had a more tortuous path toward national respect than "The Star-Spangled Banner," penned by Francis Scott Key two centuries ago in the wee hours of Sept. 14.

In this photo released by an official website of the Iranian supreme leader's office, Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei speaks during a meeting in Tehran, Iran, Sunday, Sept. 7, 2014. Iran's supreme leader underwent prostate surgery on Monday at a government hospital in Tehran, state media said in a rare report on the state of health of the country's top cleric. The 75-year-old, who has final say on all state matters in Iran and has been the country's top leader since 1989, was reported to be recovering. (AP Photo/Office of the Supreme Leader)

LOPEZ: Obama pledges additional support for Iranian puppet regimes

President Obama pledged an expanded U.S. effort to destroy the Islamic State, but given that the only territory IS currently threatens are the regimes of two Iranian puppets – one in Baghdad, one in Damascus – his announcement in effect amounts to a renewed U.S. commitment to support Tehran's grip on regional hegemony.

Scotland Freedom Threatens U.K. Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pondering an independent Scotland

On Sept. 18, the people of Scotland will go to the polls to vote on whether or not to leave the United Kingdom and end more than 300 years of union with England.

BOOK REVIEW: 'One Million Steps: A Marine Platoon at War'

Perhaps the definitive account of Marine Corps infantry in combat is Eugene Sledge's "With the Old Breed," a report of his experiences in the final brutal island battles of World War II in the Pacific as a member of the Third Battalion, Fifth Marine Regiment (3/5).

Two rival U.S. senators spend a week on a deserted island, courtesy of the Discovery Channel. (Photo from Discovery Channel)

Discovery Channel strands two rival U.S. senators on deserted island in shark-infested waters

- The Washington Times

It was inevitable. The old "survivor" reality TV template has gone political. The Discovery Channel has produced "Rival Survival",which takes a pair of real world political adversaries and maroons them on a remote island for a week. No, really. This is not a joke. "Senators Jeff Flake, Arizona Republican, and Martin Heinrich, Minnesota Democrat,must put their political differences aside and work together for six days and six nights to find common ground through compromise if they want to survive," the network says.