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Illustration on expanding health care choices for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Remodeling veterans’ health care for the 21st century

From 2007 to 2009, I served as undersecretary for health in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Overseeing the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), I often saw the best of what our nation offers veterans recovering from the wounds of war in a system staffed by committed health professionals devoted to providing quality care.

Fethullah Gulen     The Washington Times

A Gulen factor in Turkey’s turmoil?

As the dust settles in Turkey following the bloodiest coup in recent history, questions continue to surface about who was behind the recent uprising. In the midst of the unfolding drama, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accused rival Fethullah Gulen of being behind the putsch.

Clinton Scandals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A vivid symbol of scandal

Democrats gathered for their convention in Philadelphia know Hillary Clinton did not escape her latest bout with scandal unscathed. While Hillary once more remained one step ahead of the law, she is several steps behind the public. She could not have picked a worse time for her latest foray into the ethical morass.

North Korea Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho talks to a reporter after a break during the 23rd Asean Regional meeting in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Disappointment with China

China’s reaction to the decision of the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague that there was no evidence that China had exercised exclusive control over the waters or resources historically in the South China Sea was disappointing but expected.

Illustration on the Democratic National Convention by Tim Brinton

Chaos at the Democratic National Convention

Cleveland versus Philadelphia. So many predicted a cataclysmic disaster for the Republicans during their convention. Yet, it ended up being an organized, well-run event showcasing the reformation of the Republican Party and propelling Donald Trump to the biggest post-convention bounce for either party since 2000.

Tim Kaine (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A sad tale of two disposable veeps

- The Washington Times

A governor is always a good choice for a vice president. He (or she) has learned how to run an administration, how to work with a cranky legislature and understands staying close to the people who elected him. There’s no Praetorian guard to keep him separated from the people.

Illustration on the history of the Democratic Party convention by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Unconventional Democrats

It’s Democratic convention time, and while this year’s shindig may not be anything to write home about, the confabs in the old days were knock-down, drag-out affairs. For example, it took nine ballots to nominate James K. Polk in 1844; 49 for Franklin Pierce in 1852, 17 for James Buchanan in 1856, and 22 for Horatio Seymour in 1868.

Illustration on leveraging U.S. visas against China's territorial aggression in the South China Sea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Reversing China’s South China Sea grab

The South China Sea (SCS) is currently the focus of a dispute between the People’s Republic of China (PRC), Taiwan, the Philippines, Vietnam, Malaysia, Indonesia and Brunei. The PRC has preemptively deployed military personnel and equipment to enforce their claims to a trumped-up, self-identified but unrecognized “nine-dash line,” an imagined boundary that is inconsistent with international law and commonly accepted international behavior.

Illustration on all terrain powered wheelchairs for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Wheelchairs for veterans

Many Americans are familiar with the military creed of never leaving a fallen comrade behind, a commitment that has served as the real-life inspiration for Hollywood movies chronicling daring rescue operations under impossible odds of injured or captured service members.

In-Activist Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to defeat activists

This month, Congress passed a bill requiring all genetically improved foods to be labeled. But it’s essentially meaningless. Genetically improved foods are just as safe as the veggies in a backyard garden, and virtually all foods — organic or not — have been genetically improved at some point in their history.

Illustration on the stagnation of the Democrat party by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The late, great Democratic Party

This week the Democrats officially coronate the battered Hillary Clinton as the torch bearer for the party. She has slouched to the finish line. She is tired and the country is tired of her. Sorry, Democrats, no do-overs. You’re stuck with her.

EPA Smog Test on Humans Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The EPA’s secret whitewash

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is trying to use the prestigious National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to cover-up the agency’s illegal science experiments on humans.

No Troops to Poland Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama must not send troops to Poland

This month, the Obama administration announced it would send 1,000 troops to Poland on a regular rotation as part of ongoing efforts to shore up the North Atlantic Treaty Organization’s (NATO’s) Eastern flank. These American troops, said President Obama, will “serve shoulder to shoulder with Polish soldiers” to help out one of our country’s “most committed and important allies.”

Related Articles

Clinton not off hook yet

In light of FBI Director James Comey's 'no-indictment' determination of Hillary Clinton, many people have become angry or depressed, chanting "A Clinton won again" ("Why the FBI let Hillary Clinton off," Web, July 11). Ronald Kessler notes that Mr. Comey did not want to take on "an unwinnable case" under Section 793(f) of the U.S. criminal code. However, as a glass-half-full kind of person, I see an opportunity here.

Don't give corruption the wheel

July 4, 1776 is a holy day on the calendar of American history and a turning point in world affairs. July 5, 2016 is now a day that shall live in infamy, because it was the day the FBI decided that all men, but not all women, may be equal before the law.

Illustration on the loss of fighting spirit in the U.S. armed forces by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Don't give up the ship'

The recent release of the investigative report on the "surrender" of two U.S. Navy heavily armed, 48-foot Riverine Coastal Patrol Boats in the North Arabian Sea on Jan. 12 to slightly smaller, armed Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps Navy center-console fishing-type boats was more than an embarrassment for the Navy.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton addresses the The National Education Association (NEA) Representative Assembly in Washington, Tuesday, July 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

Apple polishing on the stump

Hillary Clinton took pandering to a new level when she addressed delegates to the National Education Association's (NEA) convention on July 5.

Illustration on the excess brought out in partisans at election time by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Where fools rush in

Presidential campaigns bring out the best and the worst in the American partisan. The nominating conventions evoke exuberance and awe, excessive indulgence and sometimes even quiet dignity. Some speakers express humility and others parade a supercilious arrogance.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a press conference with Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson at the Foreign Office in London, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool)

The nightmarish results of Muslim outreach

When President Obama entered office, he dreamed that his hope-and-change messaging and his references to his familial Islamic roots would win over the Muslim world. The soon-to-be Nobel Peace Prize laureate would make the United States liked in the Middle East. Then terrorism would decrease.

Illustration on Trump's acceptance speech by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The speech Donald Trump should give tonight to win it all

- The Washington Times

Tonight in Cleveland, Donald Trump will accept the Republican nomination for president of the United States. His ascent is the most astonishing political story of our lifetimes, and he achieved it with breathtaking fearlessness, cleverness, wit and smarts. Most importantly, he had from the start an extraordinary sixth sense of the anger, betrayal and anxiety roiling voters and driving their desire to smash the existing order.

Iran Missile Factory Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama's Iran delusions

July 14 was the first anniversary of President Obama's nuclear agreement with Iran. Because the agreement renders our intelligence community deaf and blind to Iran's nuclear weapons program, the new report from a German intelligence agency that Iran is violating the deal comes as no surprise.

BOOK REVIEW: 'This Brave New World: India, China and the United States'

On a crisp November morning last year, when Donald Trump's candidacy was little more than a cloud the size of a man's fist -- and the fist of a man with tiny hands, at that -- it occurred to me that if it ever did take off, a lot of its success would be due to his strongly protectionist stance on global trade.

FILE - This April 28, 2010 file photo shows the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal-fired power plant in Colstrip, Mont. The Colstrip plant, a coal plant serving utility customers across the Pacific Northwest, has agreed to shut down two of its four units by 2022 under a settlement announced Tuesday, July 12, 2016, with environmentalists who sued over alleged air pollution violations. (AP Photo/Matt Brown, file)

Foolishness over fossil fuels

The masterminds who put their heads together to "improve" the planet sometimes only bump those heads together. Environmentalists have confidently -- and arrogantly -- declared that their "green" policies are based on "settled science," but evidence continues to trickle in to dispute that. On paper, saving the world is as elementary as ridding it of fossil fuels. Experience, however, teaches that "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."

Saudis no ally

We are far beyond the point at which America should have awoken to the deep and lasting deception and harm that has been the hallmark of Saudi Arabia's "friendly and cooperative" relationship with the United States ("Secret chapter of 9/11 inquiry released after 13-year wait," Web, July 15).

Removing God from U.S. life

At the Dallas memorial service for the slain police officers, President Obama declared, "We are not as divided as we seem" and "I know America," as though he were the modern father of our country. He also made reference to Scripture, including saying that we are "children of God."

Illustration on the relationship between honor killings an Islamist terrorism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Honor killings' and Islamic terrorism

The world is in chaos, as Islamic violence is setting the tone with terrorism. Whether it be Orlando or Nice or the Bavarian train slasher, we're all told it was a "lone wolf" transformed into a monster by "radicalization," one of the left's favorite fabricated explanations.

Melania Trump stands at the podium during the opening day of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland, Monday, July 18, 2016. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)

Melania Trump's home run

Stealing the published words of others is never a good idea, particularly in Washington, but whether it's a felony or a misdemeanor usually depends on who the sinner may be. Democrats often get by with plagiarism, Republicans usually don't.

Illustration on Republican support of Trump at the GOP convention by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Republicans hold their course

- The Washington Times

The political disaster that many predicted last week would begin here in Cleveland with a divisive rules fight, and put a fractured and dysfunctional Republican Party on display for all to see, hasn't happened.