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Illustration on Iran's empty condemnation of terrorism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Iran’s empty condemnation of terrorism

About two days after an Orlando gunman carried out the worst mass shooting in U.S. history, the Iranian foreign ministry issued a statement purporting to decry the incident. Speaking via the state-run IRNA, a spokesperson said the Iranian regime “condemns” the attack “based on its principled policy of condemning terrorism and its strong will to seriously confront this evil phenomenon.”

Illustration on prospects for the post-EU British economy by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Britain’s economy, post-Brexit

This is no time to sell the United Kingdom short. Its economic and political institutions remain among the strongest in the world and should afford it considerable opportunity to negotiate new arrangements with the European Union.

Albanian Prime Minister Edi Rama, left, welcomes the Albanian national soccer squad arriving in Tirana after failing to qualify to the next round at the EURO 2016 European Championship, Thursday, June 23, 2016.(AP Photo/Hektor Pustina)

An albatross in Albania?

In what is increasingly reminiscent of a John Le Carre novel, it seems that with each passing month there is a new chapter in a seemingly unending series of revelations of political intrigue and drama that are overwhelming the Republic of Albania.

Illustration on the Brexit outcome's effects on uncontrolled migration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Rule Britannia

Whether you think the United Kingdom exiting the European Union is cause for alarm or celebration, you have to concede this: Britons engaged in an open, lively and mostly peaceful debate, they turned out in droves, they cast their votes freely and fairly and, by so doing, expressed their will and determined their future. That’s called democracy. Is there a preferable alternative?

Term Limits for Congress Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The common sense of term limits

As our first president, George Washington knew that everything he did set a pattern for those who would follow. He served two terms in office, then stepped down. He declined all efforts to get him to stay.

Illustration on a proposal to create boards of directors to oversee Executive branch departments by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A remedy for overregulation

If the 2016 presidential election has proved anything so far, it’s that millions of Americans know something is seriously wrong in Washington and they want it fixed. They’re right.

Jihad Magazines Collage by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The original jihadists

They wave a menacing black banner, behead American hostages in slickly produced videos, entice hardened jihadis and thrill-seeking wannabes alike to their ranks, bust a border to establish a state and claim provinces from West Africa to Southeast Asia.

Illustration on Joyful Noise's fundraising for the Sanders campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Joyful Noise unites ‘citizens for Sanders’

Throughout this year’s presidential primary, Sen. Bernie Sanders made support for tougher campaign finance laws a cornerstone of his (now presumably concluding) campaign. His website railed against the “political campaign finance system” as “corrupt,” and “the disastrous Citizens United Supreme Court decision” as “hing[ing] on the absurd notion that money is speech, [and] corporations are people.”

Illustration on the need to identify radical Islamic's impact on homosexuality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s duty after Orlando

Americans witnessed evil once again as a radical Islamic gunman — who pledged allegiance to the Islamic State’s caliph — recently killed or wounded 102 people while they were enjoying “Latin Night” in a popular gay night club in Orlando. It was the deadliest attack on the lesbian, bisexual, gay and transgender (LBGT) community in American history.

Brexit Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Brexit’s unsettling aftermath

The British independence referendum vote on June 23 was close and, surely we all will respect the will of the British people. The British prime minister, doing the honorable thing, resigned. Yet many British people are deeply ashamed of the result, owing to the barely unspoken rationale behind many votes: immigration (very un-British), and the likely consequences.

Chicken Little

Nobody does hysteria like the media

- The Washington Times

Chicken Little will have company when the sky falls on the British isles and the world ends, which the European Union, The New York Times, The Washington Post, the BBC, CBS, NBC, ABC and Barack Obama can now say with confidence will be at 2:20 in the morning next Thursday (just in time for the late final editions).

Illustration on U.S. job opportunities and economic stagnation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Brexit’ strikes back at the elites

Last week, Britain voted to leave the European Union, freeing itself from international governance. Just as the United States would recoil at the thought of Canadians making laws that trump U.S. governance were that a provision of the North American Free Trade Agreement, Britain is evidently fed up with ceding its sovereignty to unelected bureaucrats in Brussels as part of its international agreements.

Related Articles

Obama's allegiance questionable

President Obama and his administration recently took major steps to protect radical Muslims. They even went so far as to use extreme measures to change the Orlando terrorist's expression of allegiance to Allah to an expression of allegiance God in telephone-conversation transcripts. This is an insult to Judeo-Christian religions. Fortunately Mr. Obama failed in this instance.

Price of 'free stuff'

If you want to see how the federal government under a President Hillary Clinton would look and act, look no further than the people's republic of California. Under a progressive legislature and governor, California is building a $68-billion high-speed train from the metropolis of nowhere to the far side of podunk city.

Rep. John Lewis, D-Ga., center, joined by, from left, House Assistant Minority Leader James Clyburn of S.C., Rep. Joseph Crowley, D-N.Y., House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif., and Rep. Charles Rangel, D-N.Y., speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 23, 2016, after House Democrats ended their sit-in protest.  (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Sitting down on the job

Disgruntled members of Congress have rarely caught the point of what the public thinks of Congress quite like the Democratic sit-in in the House of Representatives. "Sitting on their ample rumps" is exactly what most voters think Congress usually does. The characterization is sometimes unfair, but this time the rump makes the point.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Little Red Chairs'

Someone once said whether history remembers you as a rebel or a freedom fighter depends on whether you lose or win. Whether the same applies to a dictator is open to question. Edna O'Brien seems to be playing with these ideas in her new, complex novel, "The Little Red Chairs."

House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis. leaves after a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 23, 2016. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Paul Ryan's leadership move

House Speaker Paul Ryan unveiled a pro-growth, pro-job agenda this week that Republicans will run on in the fall to get the American economy moving again.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The bad moon rising over Hillary

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton won't be able to say she didn't see the bad moon rising. Donald Trump gave her a blistering introduction this week to Presidential Politics 102, which differs in a remarkable way from Politics 101, which she encountered in her first attempt in 2008 and before that as the managing partner in Bubba's two campaigns.

Illustration on the Obama administration's plans for the fossil fuel industry by Greg groesch/The Washington Times

Why Exxon is not the problem

For more than 200 years, the American birthright has provided protection against the threat that one's head might hang on London Bridge -- or the Key Bridge, if you prefer -- for disagreeing with the government.

Illustration on the struggle for Kurdish independence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Kurdish independence matters

If the next U.S. president wants "to put America first" he might look toward the Kurdish north of Iraq. There the long-standing question of Kurdish independence scares Washington into a tired reflex that quashes important U.S. interests beneath an unwavering policy to promote the fiction of a unified Iraq.

House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wis. arrives at the American Enterprise Institute (AEI) in Washington, Wednesday, June 22, 2016, to talk about new proposals to repeal and replace President Barack Obama's health care law. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Charting 'A Better Way'

From the horrors of terrorism in Orlando to the wave of trash talk it invited, outrage each day in the waning months of the Obama era exceeds the outrage of the previous day.

Arkansas knows real Clintons

Daniel Gallington's "The lie that is Hillary" (Web, June 19) provides an excellent summary of Hillary Clinton's "public service" career, and is especially enlightening for the low-information voter. Mr. Gallington answers the question of why the Clintons didn't return to Arkansas by accurately stating that returning would have been the financial and political end for the Clintons.

Britain's Prime Minister David Cameron delivers a speech at a Britain Stronger In Europe event during campaigning for people to vote to remain inside the EU in Birmingham, England,  Wednesday June 22, 2016.  On Thursday Britain votes in a national referendum on whether to stay inside the EU, a momentous decision with far-reaching implications for Britain and Europe. (Geoff Caddick / Pool via AP)

Decision time in Britain

These are not encouraging days for the "elites" and the political "establishments" of the world. Voters are fed up everywhere, and looking not only for ways out of the mess but for ways to punish the authors of the misery. A president's/prime minister's/premier's lot is not a happy one.

Character quality ignored

"Hillary Clinton's honesty problem may end up not being much of a problem at all," writes Ben Wolfgang ("Hillary Clinton still backed by voters, with honesty issues aside," Web, June 19). Indeed, that which was once regarded as imperative among most voters — character — is no longer a matter of paramount concern, even when it comes to the election of the president of the United States.

Strong Families Make a Strong America Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The father factor

Father's Day has come and gone. The grills are turned off and the gift ties have been put away. The leisurely family time is over and we are all back to the daily grind. But there is much work to do to strengthen America's families.

FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2013, file photo, a student walks across the Lawn in front of the Rotunda at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va., while the Rotunda was undergoing renovation. Amid scrutiny from Congress and campus activists, colleges across the country are under growing pressure to reveal the financial investments made using their endowments. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

Why we need charter public colleges

In 2014 state community colleges and four-year colleges taught more than 13 million students, or about 76 percent of all college students in the nation. But these public institutions are in serious trouble.

Illustration on the Republican alternative to Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ryan's Obamacare liberation

Paul Ryan's House Republican Task Force on health policy reform released on Wednesday the Republican majority's unified plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. Republicans should not be shy about making this reform the centerpiece of this year's election.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gestures as she "sighs" talking about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a rally in Raleigh, N.C., Wednesday, June 22, 2016. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Character no longer counts

Ranking right up there with the line, "Other than that, Mrs. Lincoln, how did you like the play?" is this recent headline in The Washington Times: "Honesty issues aside, voters still back Hillary Clinton, poll shows."