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Chicken Little

Nobody does hysteria like the media

- The Washington Times

Chicken Little will have company when the sky falls on the British isles and the world ends, which the European Union, The New York Times, The Washington Post, the BBC, CBS, NBC, ABC and Barack Obama can now say with confidence will be at 2:20 in the morning next Thursday (just in time for the late final editions).

Illustration on U.S. job opportunities and economic stagnation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Brexit’ strikes back at the elites

Last week, Britain voted to leave the European Union, freeing itself from international governance. Just as the United States would recoil at the thought of Canadians making laws that trump U.S. governance were that a provision of the North American Free Trade Agreement, Britain is evidently fed up with ceding its sovereignty to unelected bureaucrats in Brussels as part of its international agreements.

In this photo taken, March 17, 2016, people rally in front of the San Luis Obispo County government building in support of Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in San Luis Obispo, Calif. Pacific Gas & Electric Co. and environmental groups said Tuesday, June 21, 2016, that they've reached an agreement that will close the Diablo Canyon plant, California's last nuclear power plant, by 2025. (David Middlecamp/The Tribune (of San Luis Obispo) via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

How ‘greens’ add to greenhouse gases

Listening to environmentalists talk about the threat of climate change is like hearing some lost passage of the Book of Revelation with predictions of flooded cities, wildfires, hurricanes, failing crops and swarms of disease-bearing mosquitoes.

Illustration on America's military strength versus tyranny by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The enduring strength of America

As we soon pause to celebrate the anniversary of our nation’s independence, it seems appropriate to consider the vital role played by the American military in the creation of our nation and its transformation of our world.

Illustration on the Brexit vote. (Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times)

What the British revolt signals

Oh what a difference a break makes. On Thursday, our English cousins across the pond voted to leave the European Union. For some reason, they had enough of unelected bureaucrats issuing rules and regulations ruining their lives and throwing the future in the dustbin.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's economic plans by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary pleads for four more years

“People are working harder and longer just to keep their heads above water. And to deal with the costs, the everyday costs, the costs of basics like childcare and prescription drugs that are too high. College is getting more expensive every day. And wages are still too low and inequality is too great. Good jobs in this country are still too hard to come by.”

Illustration on Chinese drugs coming through Mexico by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Drugs and thugs

On June 9, The New York Times ran this headline on Page A1: “Drug That Killed Prince Is Making Mexican Cartels Richer, U.S. Says.” The first line of the story reads, “The drug that killed Prince has become a favorite of Mexican cartels because it is extremely potent, popular in the United States — and immensely profitable, American officials say.”

Eco-Terrorism Damage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Greenpeace under fire

Governments and courts around the world are finally cracking down on the eco-terrorist organization Greenpeace. The crackdown, which is long overdue, couldn’t happen to a more misguided bunch of people.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The bad moon rising over Hillary

- The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton won’t be able to say she didn’t see the bad moon rising. Donald Trump gave her a blistering introduction this week to Presidential Politics 102, which differs in a remarkable way from Politics 101, which she encountered in her first attempt in 2008 and before that as the managing partner in Bubba’s two campaigns.

Illustration on the Obama administration's plans for the fossil fuel industry by Greg groesch/The Washington Times

Why Exxon is not the problem

For more than 200 years, the American birthright has provided protection against the threat that one’s head might hang on London Bridge — or the Key Bridge, if you prefer — for disagreeing with the government.

Illustration on the struggle for Kurdish independence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why Kurdish independence matters

If the next U.S. president wants “to put America first” he might look toward the Kurdish north of Iraq. There the long-standing question of Kurdish independence scares Washington into a tired reflex that quashes important U.S. interests beneath an unwavering policy to promote the fiction of a unified Iraq.

Illustration on the Republican alternative to Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ryan’s Obamacare liberation

Paul Ryan’s House Republican Task Force on health policy reform released on Wednesday the Republican majority’s unified plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. Republicans should not be shy about making this reform the centerpiece of this year’s election.

Illustration on the dangers of Obama, the ideologue by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ideologues make for dangerous politicians

Hillary Clinton is a seasoned liberal politician, but one with few core beliefs. Her positions on subjects such as gay marriage, free-trade agreements, the Keystone XL pipeline, the Iraq War, the Assad regime in Syria and the use of the term “radical Islam” all seem to hinge on what she perceives 51 percent of the public to believe on any given day.

Related Articles

Illustration on the need for Syrian safe zones by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reconsidering safe zones in Syria

The situation in Syria remains bleak, with no end in sight to its five-year civil war. President Bashar Assad's forces and their Russian and Iranian backers continue to lay waste to rebel-held territory, leaving the rebels with shrinking leverage to pressure the regime into a lasting political settlement.

Commanders Worth More Than Lawyers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Commanders hold the key to military justice

Some lawmakers seek to remove senior commanders from decisions to refer cases for prosecution. They would place that power with a senior military attorney in another organization, separate from the victim or the accused. Before making such a change, proponents should consider not only recent changes, but also how the proposed changes would affect the combat readiness of our armed forces.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Castaway's War: One Man's Battle Against Imperial Japan'

Of all the combat veterans I have encountered in almost half a century of writing, not a single person has claimed the accolade "hero," regardless of the number of ribbons he wears. I recall vividly the reaction of a much-decorated veteran of the Korean War when I suggested his actions earned him such a designation.

Gosnell in Prison Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Kermit Gosnell and the suffering abortion industry

Abortionist and convicted murderer Kermit Gosnell calls himself an "impractical man." Speaking from his prison cell, where he sits for killing a patient and three born-alive babies, he told one of the documentary filmmakers of "3801 Lancaster: American Tragedy": "Practical man changes to live within his society.

Illustration on Clinton money by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What Donald Trump has learned

It has now been a year since Donald Trump formally became a politician and declared his candidacy for the nation's highest office. Actually, it has been a little over a year, because he was considering it for months before he declared from Trump Tower on June 16, 2015. What has he learned?

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks about the economy at Fort Hayes Vocational School Tuesday, June 21, 2016, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Factors that elected Bill could now defeat Hillary

Hillary Clinton knows better than anyone the economy's weakness and its political danger. The reason George H.W. Bush lost a close race to a political outsider with glaring liabilities 24 years ago was public perception that the economy was weak.

In this June 18, 2016, photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at the Treasure Island hotel and casino in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Campaign turnaround for Trump?

Real estate tycoon Donald Trump, who has ignited a political fire storm in the Republican Party, has fired his presidential campaign manager, saying he will change his style for the general election.

Illustration on ineffectual Obama administration strategies against ISIS by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama's disintegrating strategy

Throughout his presidency, Barack Obama has maintained his willful ignorance of the fact that weakness against terrorists abroad, coupled with weakness against them at home, add up to more than the sum of their parts. To defeat terrorists, we need to have policies at home and strategies abroad that are integrated and support each other.

Boris Johnson. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

It's crunch time in Old Blighty

- The Washington Times

This is do-or-die week in Old Blighty. Our British cousins will decide Thursday whether to reclaim their birthright, voting to leave the European Union and the Germans, French and an assorted gang of easy riders, and reclaim their status as a world-power capable of sitting on its own bottom.

Stop Israeli Boycotts Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No boycotts against Israel

Last Sunday, Gov. Andrew Cuomo of New York signed Executive Order No. 157, directing state entities to divest all public funds supporting the Boycott, Divestment and Sanctions (BDS) campaign against Israel.

French President Francois Hollande arrives in the stands prior to the Euro 2016 Group A soccer match between France and Albania at the Velodrome stadium in Marseille, France, Wednesday, June 15, 2016. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

A cheer, please, for France

These are not happy times for Europe. Angela Merkel has invited in more house guests than Germany can accommodate, the British are talking about leaving the European Union (though Britain has never regarded itself as part of continental Europe), and la belle France is the principal target for Muslim terrorists. Paris has suffered two bloody attacks within the past 18 months.

President Barack Obama walks off stage after speaking at the SelectUSA Investment Summit in Washington, Monday, June 20, 2016. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

President Obama's altered reality

It's not the crime, but the cover-up. This is the first rule that every administration, Democrat and Republican, liberal and conservative, learns, and usually the hard way. Some crimes are more serious than others, but a little crime, like a little acorn, can grow into a mighty scandal or a mighty oak.

Nothing 'peaceful' about murder

One would expect that, at some point in his daily security briefings during his more than 2,700 days in office, President Obama would have been informed of the tens of thousands of terrorist attacks that have taken place around the world during his tenure.

A Change of Mind Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Words, not weapons

Most people who have reached a certain age have changed their minds about something or someone that they firmly believed in the past. Many of the real conflicts in society, including hate-driven mass shootings, result from people who fail to acknowledge, even to themselves, that they could be wrong.