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Illustration on crony capitalism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Crony capitalism against the real thing

For the past decade, a strange migration of a couple of thousand people from all over the world to Las Vegas takes place — in the middle of July. They come — at least most — not to gamble and certainly not for the weather where the normal daytime temperature is a 100-plus degrees, but to participate in an event called FreedomFest.

President Donald Trump pauses during a joint news conference with French President Emmanuel Macron at the Elysee Palace in Paris, Thursday, July 13, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Trump’s right: It’s a sewer, not a swamp

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump tweeted in the lead-up to Jared Kushner’s widely waited for Senate-Russia testimony that it’s not a swamp he’s trying to drain. It’s a sewer. And yes indeed, that description is much more apt.

Righting the Ship of Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A plan to save Social Security

It is no secret that what the major media seem to care most about is radically different from what concerns average Americans. While the inside-the-Beltway crowd continues to focus on alleged collusion between President Trump and Russia, real concerns like the future of Social Security are ignored.

Sudan Corruption Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A necessary delay for easing of Sudan sanctions

The announcement last week by the Trump administration that it is delaying the Obama administration’s order to ease sanctions on Sudan was a welcome decision. The three-month delay is not long enough to give the Sudanese the impression that we are not serious about this matter, but will be long enough to complete the needed and ongoing review of that government’s adherence to the requirements of sanctions-easing.

Kurdistan Partnership Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A strategic U.S. partner in Kurdistan

This year is the 25th anniversary of the election of the first Parliament and government of the Kurdistan Region of Iraq (KRI). Thanks to the safe haven that the United States and its European allies created in 1991 to protect the displaced Kurdish population from Baghdad’s brutal attacks, the Kurds turned a crisis into an opportunity to build a forward-looking nation with democratic aspirations.

Illustration on government run Health Care by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The fake ‘health care’ debate

Confucius, who lived so long ago that famine, not obesity, menaced public health, supposedly observed that “the first step to wisdom is to call things by their proper name.” If so, then angry congressional town hall meetings and serial legislative impasses are not really about health care, let alone reform.

FILE - IN this Dec. 2, 2009, file photo, the Total Port Arthur refinery is shown in Port Arthur, Texas. Federal lawsuits against the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency were filed claiming the agency has failed to correct Texas air pollution control permits with loopholes that make state enforcement rare. The suits filed Thursday, July 20, 2017, by the nonprofit Washington, D.C.-based Environmental Integrity Project, target permits for the largest integrated petrochemical factory in the U.S., three refineries near the Houston Ship Channel including the largest petroleum refinery in the U.S. and a coal-fired power plant east of Dallas. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip, File)

Peddlers of junk science

For America’s 207 million coffee drinkers, this month’s “latest study” brought a venti-sized serving of good news: A healthy dose of coffee leads to a longer life.

Illustration on examining voter fraud by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rooting out vote fraud

Judging by the unhinged reaction this past week to the first public meeting of President Trump’s blue-ribbon voter fraud panel, progressives are terrified.

Iranian Intentions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Certifiably wrong about Iran’s compliance

During President Trump’s campaign he said that Mr. Obama’s 2015 nuclear weapons deal with Iran was the “worst deal ever.” Although there are many diplomatic deals vying for that title, the deal engineered by Mr. Obama is at least one of the worst ever for two reasons.

How to fix the Obamacare fiasco

It’s no grand revelation that Republicans have bungled the Obamacare repeal bill beyond belief. Sen. Mitch McConnell wants a Senate vote on full repeal of Obamacare with two years to come up with a replacement. This would be the ideal solution, but it appears he lacks the necessary 50 votes for passage.

In this Feb. 28, 2017, photo, an F-15C Eagle from the California Air National Guard, 144th Fighter Wing, flies out of the nicknamed Star Wars Canyon over Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Restoring the military’s moral underpinnings

The Trump administration came to power with a clear mandate to restore U.S. military credibility, effectiveness, and capabilities. Such a mandate involves reversing not only the debilitating impact of sequestration on our declining military force structure, but also the Obama administration’s social engineering mandates forced on our military.

Misdirected Canadian Money Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Time

The travesty of rewarding a terrorist

In July 2002, Omar Khadr was accused of throwing a hand grenade and killing a U.S. Army combat medic, Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Speer, on the battlefields of Afghanistan. Khadr was ultimately captured, linked to al Qaeda (reportedly through his father’s connections), pled guilty, and sat in a Guantanamo Bay jail cell before being repatriated by Canada in 2012.

Robert Mueller. (Associated Press)

The swamp strikes back

- The Washington Times

A lot of snakes and scorpions live with the alligators in the swamp, and there are even more dangerous monsters there. No swamp creature is deadlier than a Washington lawyer.

Illustration on the border wall and security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond the good news of the wall

Based upon President Trump’s promise to secure the U.S. Border with Mexico, illegal immigration plummeted during the first half of 2017. In the first three months of his presidency, illegal border crossings fell by nearly 75 percent from that of the previous year and represented a historic low in the modern history of the Border Patrol. What President Trump accomplished is nothing short of a miracle, but he can’t continue to do it alone. Border security is not the sole responsibility of the White House; it’s also the responsibility of Congress.

Related Articles

Lawyers' Gift from the CFPB Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A consumer bureau gift to trial lawyers

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), the arm of the government supposedly looking out for the interests of consumers, has trampled on consumers to deliver Christmas in July for the trial lawyers.

Illustration on the BNP and terrorism in Bangladesh by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Terrorism in Bangladesh under the guise of politics

The western media and several otherwise well-intentioned nongovernmental organizations routinely criticize Bangladesh for taking actions against leaders of the country's main opposition party, the Bangladesh Nationalist Party, or BNP. They assume that accusing opposition party members with crimes is automatically undemocratic and undermines the rule of law.

Illustration on the homicidal spirit behind police killings by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why the war on cops is a war on all of us

As a writer, I've gone out on patrol with police officers, accompanied narcotics squads on drug raids, observed detectives investigating murders and other crimes, and I've interviewed police commanders and commissioners in station houses and police headquarters.

Illustration of Vladimir Putin by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Putin's playthings

About a year ago, Donald Trump Jr. met with a mysterious Russian lawyer, Natalia Veselnitskaya. Mr. Trump Jr. was purportedly eager to receive information that could damage Hillary Clinton's 2016 presidential campaign.

Buying Other People's Contraception Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When insurance becomes a method of taxation

Gail Collins writes in The New York Times that "While Ivanka has been making mewling noises about working moms, the Trump White House has appointed people to major health care policy jobs who don't appear to believe in contraception."

Illustration on government overspending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Porking out with your money

Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to eliminate governmental waste and fraud, just released its "2017 Congressional Pig Book," an annual publication highlighting wasteful government spending that should embarrass each and every member of Congress.

The magnificent mind of a flawed Founder

If words were all that mattered, Thomas Jefferson would, indeed, have been the "Architect of American Liberty" that John Boles proclaims in the subtitle of his impressive new biography. Had Thomas Jefferson never written another word after the Declaration of Independence, he would be remembered as author of one of the most influential documents in the history of political thought.

Greens should repay costs

The article "Colorado recall erupts into proxy battle on fracking between green groups, industry" (Web, July 18) was an interesting read. National green groups have been pushing for local fracking bans and recalls of local elected officials for years with little regard for the impact it will have on their finances. This has been on display in Youngstown, Ohio, where anti-fracking groups have unsuccessfully sought six times to ban fracking.

No unbiased news available

I have searched for an honest, nonbiased media source and found none. CNN, MSNBC, ABCnews, CBS News, NBC News, Fox News, Breitbart, etc. all have biases. Studies have shown that during the 2016 election there was an overwhelming liberal bias, and Wikileaks exposed numerous liberal reporters for unethical contact with the Clinton campaign.

President Donald Trump listens during a "Made in America," roundtable event in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, July 19, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

The Supreme Court tries again

The more the U.S. Supreme Court equivocates on deciding what President Trump's attempt to regulate the admission of refugees to the United States actually means, the more the court becomes the U.S. Court of Supreme Confusion. Lawyers are supposed to use precise language to reflect precise thinking, but often they don't.

FILE - In this June 15, 2017, file photo, newly developed robot for underwater investigation at the Fukushima's damaged reactor, moves in the water at a Toshiba Corp. test facility in Yokosuka, near Tokyo. The underwater robot on Wednesday, July 19, 2017, captured images and other data inside Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant on its first day of work. The robot is on a mission to study damage and find fuel that experts say has melted and mostly fallen to the bottom of a chamber and has been submerged by highly radioactive water. (AP Photo/Shuji Kajiyama, File)

The nuclear-free fantasy game

Faith is the assurance of things hoped for. The Bible tells us so. One of the things on anybody's wish list is a nuclear-free world. But without assurance that the hope will be redeemed such wishes are the stuff of idle delusion. That goes double for the expectation that the Trump administration's recertification of the deal proscribing Iran's nuclear program, and the United Nations' nuclear weapons ban, will give wing to the dove of peace.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky. speaks at a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, July 18, 2017. President Donald Trump blasted congressional Democrats and "a few Republicans" over the collapse of the GOP effort to rewrite the Obama health care law. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Rand Paul, atop white horse, rescues Obamacare PR

- The Washington Times

Republicans are having a head-hanging moment, to be sure, on Obamacare. So it's with no small measure of relief that Sen. Rand Paul has seemingly rode in on a white horse, to give the party a new public relations message on Obamacare that keeps Republicans afloat.

Sen. Kamala D. Harris

Kamala Harris: Eric Holder in a skirt

- The Washington Times

Democrats are in a tizzy about their latest and brightest prospect for the 2020 White House -- Kamala Harris, the senator from California. Make way for the next social justice warrior. Harris, a la Eric Holder, a la Barack Obama, is a far leftist with a vision of America as an inherently racist, unjust, unfair, misogynist nation.

This undated file photo shows writer George Orwell, author of "1984." (AP Photo, File)

Weaponizing language and communication

Fake news has become known for being a false story, gossip or even lies promulgated by the legacy media. We know what our news media establishment often delivers is nothing more than opinion masquerading as news. That in itself is a huge problem. We're all learning about how to recognize it and how seriously to take it, if at all.

Illustration on the efficacy of a border wall in stopping heroin flow to the U.S. by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

To stop the heroin, build the wall

There has been significant focus of late on "America's 50-state epidemic" -- opioid addiction. Many reasons have been advanced for this problem. One is that legally prescribed opioids can lead to heroin abuse. Another is that economic downturns lead to increased drug abuse. As the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has stated: "Heroin use has increased across the U.S. among men and women, most age groups, and all income levels."

Iran Non-Treaty Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Subverting the role of the treaty in American diplomacy

It is ironic that the contemporary discussion concerning American diplomacy should focus on the Paris Climate Accord. Students of history will appreciate that in 1778 that the first grand diplomatic debate of our country, the Treaty of Amity and Commerce, centered on France and is considered the first cornerstone treaty in American history.