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This is a copy of the cover of the CIA torture report released by Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein D-Calif., Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014. U.S. Senate investigators delivered a damning indictment of CIA interrogations Tuesday, accusing the spy agency of inflicting suffering on prisoners beyond its legal limits and peddling unsubstantiated stories that the harsh questioning saved American lives.  (AP Photo)

The truth about the CIA, torture, and congressional ingratitude

The truth – that enhanced interrogations saved lives, frightened other terrorists to not act, uncovered plots, and showed any al Qaeda wannabees that joining in would have serious personal consequences – is completely missing from the Senate Democrats’ report.

Blind Partisanship Donkey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats’ wasteful torture report

The recent release of a Senate report commissioned by Democrats regarding torture of terrorism suspects in order to obtain vital information was, in my opinion, a waste of $40 million of taxpayer money.

FILE - In this Nov. 13, 2014 file photo, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, after Senate Democrats voted on leadership positions for the 114th Congress.  Two years after first being elected to the Senate, Warren had a notable sophomore year, winning a leadership role and making her first official overseas trip, even as her party lost control of the Senate. From left are, Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid of Nev., Sen. Jon Tester, D-Mont., Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., Warren, Sen. Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., and Sen. Debbie Stabenow, D-Mich. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

The Democratic divide

The liberal news media have been gleefully reporting the GOP’s political quarrels for many years. That exaggerated storyline all but vanished last week, though, in the aftermath of the Democrats’ humiliating defeats in the midterm elections.

"Bumpering" Hillary 2016 Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Pining for Elizabeth Warren

Barack Obama is so yesterday. The elitists who supported him as the great “progressive” hope are abandoning him in droves as his popularity plummets. The Washington Post describes him as having the “worst” year of anyone in Washington, and as Republicans prepare to take over the Senate, he looks more and more like a lame duck incapable of delivering much more of anything to his base.

Illustration on the need for enhanced interrogation for national security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

America needs its rough men

In spring 2009, I was invited to debate “torture” with Jon Stewart on “The Daily Show.” He gave me an opportunity to make a case with which he vehemently disagreed. He didn’t spout prepackaged sound bites — he presented thoughtful counterarguments. Not many television talk show hosts are willing — or able — to do that.

Karl Rove, a personable fellow who was deputy chief of staff in George W. Bush's White House and is sometimes credited with being the genius of George W.'s success, turns out to be a big fan of "rectal feeding," as used by the CIA to persuade terror suspects to spill their secrets.  (Associated Press/File)

Be careful who takes you to lunch

- The Washington Times

Lunch can sometimes be a big deal in Washington. Lunch is where alliances are struck, deals are made, and sometimes where foes become more or less friends over a shrimp cocktail or a chicken salad at the Palm. But if Karl Rove invites you to lunch, be sure you get to pick the restaurant.

Illustration on Saudi Arabia's strategic use of its oil supply by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Saudis allow falling oil prices to squeeze archrival Iran

Conventional wisdom in Western capitals holds that Saudi Arabia has held firm in sessions with its OPEC partners against lowering production — which would restore higher prices — in order to maintain its market share in countries belonging to the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development and to dissuade investors from pouring more money into growing North American shale and tar sands production.

Illustration on the failings of Common Core by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Common Core doesn’t make the grade

It’s one thing to experience “buyer’s remorse” when the product is something you can return easily, from new clothes to a set of high-end speakers. It’s another when you’re talking about your state’s educational standards. Yet more and more states are finding that there’s simply no living with Common Core. Parents, teachers, students and lawmakers have become increasingly vocal in their criticism of the federally backed standards — and more and more of them are taking action.

Socialist policies undoing success of South America’s strongest economy

Why do very successful nations often adopt policies that lead to their undoing? After a revolution or major reform, some countries allow a high degree of economic freedom, establish the rule of law, protect private property rights and establish low tax rates with strict limits on government spending and regulation. The economy takes off, the citizens become far richer and then the government mucks it up, usually by attempting to redistribute income and expand state control.

Illustration on Obamacare's mandate to share medical records with multiple government agencies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Another Obamacare blow to personal privacy

Get ready to fight back: Last week, the Health and Human Services Department announced a plan to share your medical records with over 35 federal agencies — all in the name of “health care,” of course. All in the name of “efficiency,” the favorite excuse used by fascists wherever they appear.

Illustration on impending EPA regulatory takeover of U.S. "waterways" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A vast land grab to ‘protect’ water

In November, comments closed on a proposal by the Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to redefine “waters of the United States,” as set forth in the Clean Water Act of 1977. While Sen. Edmund Muskie, Maine Democrat, author of the 1977 law, required 88 pages for his entire statute, this spring’s Federal Register notice ran 370 pages, not counting appendixes, one of which hit 300 pages alone. Little wonder the new “wetland” rules have generated controversy and a likely Supreme Court case.

Related Articles

Illustration on media protection of the Obama administration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How do we protect Barack Obama today?

- The Washington Times

About six weeks before the 2012 presidential election, I was walking through Rockefeller Center in New York when I heard a woman's voice calling my name. I hesitated before I turned around: As a conservative in Gotham, I never know if I'll be accosted by a raving leftist screaming "fascist!" at me. (Yes, that happened.)

Illustration on the moral and legal issues of CIA "torture" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The CIA and its torturers

When the head of the CIA's torture unit decided to destroy videotapes of his team's horrific work, he unwittingly set in motion a series of events that led to the release this week of the most massive, detailed documentation of unlawful behavior by high-ranking government officials and intentional infliction of pain on noncombatants by the United States government since the Civil War era. Here is the backstory.

Obama's Osama bin Laden Trophy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The White House keeps spinning

The release of a partisan Senate report on the CIA's past interrogation program has renewed the debate over the agency's use of enhanced interrogation methods. These are methods that the Obama administration has often denounced, even while taking credit for killing Osama bin Laden and while continuing the similarly controversial practice of lethal drone strikes.

Illustration on the damage done by false accusations of rape by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The feminist rape of reputation

Feminism is entering a new phase of the movement. You could call it the era of mea culpa. Feminism has rightly claimed "victim" status at the mercy of rapists, and now certain women have turned the tables and are making victims of men, but with slander, the rape of reputation. This isn't an "epidemic," as feminists have said rape is an epidemic, but the numbers are significant enough to make the headlines.

Six years of mayhem

As his sixth year in office draws to a close, President Obama continues to add to our list of problems. Republicans in charge of Congress must unite to reverse the flawed policies, executive orders and rules and regulations that have negatively affected our economy, military, security, health care, education and personal and religious freedoms.

Keeping U.S. safe, free has costs

The world would be such a grand place if all children had something to eat, no one lied or cheated, courtesy was the rule and we all loved one another. The reality, however, is that there are some really evil people out there who could not care less about others and would just as soon kill some people as look at them.

Passersby exit an entrance to the main campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., Sunday, May 31, 1998. The university's endowment of nearly $13 billion makes it the richest in the world and, if ranked against Fortune 500 companies it would be in the top 25 percent, The Boston Globe reported Sunday. (AP Photo/Patricia McDonnell)

All about feelings: Ivy League law students now too 'traumatized' over Ferguson to take exams

- The Washington Times

It is a new educational phenomenon: Ivy League law students at three major universities - Columbia, Harvard and Georgetown University - are now exempt from taking final exams if they feel "traumatized" by the grand jury decisions made in Ferguson and New York City. The students are also being offered counseling if they need it. A few professors with impressive credentials now have a few questions.

This handout artist conception provided by NASA depicts multiple-transiting planet systems. (AP)

New respect for Pluto

These are definitely not the glory days of the American space program, but we should be thankful that, as Daniel Webster said of Dartmouth College, "there are those who love it." While many were busy protesting and rioting this week, mourning young black men shot by policemen by lying down in front of passenger trains, scientists at Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory turned their attention to a quieter and saner world.

University of Alabama at Birmingham President Ray Watts,left, and UAB Vice President for Financial Affairs and Administration Allen Bolton, right,  address the media during a news conference to discuss the results of their athletics strategic planning process and closing of the UAB football football, rifle, and bowling programs, Tuesday, De. 2, 2014 in Birmingham. Ala. (AP Photo/Tamika Moore, AL.com) MAGS OUT

An Alabama university drops football

It takes strength, courage and resolve on the part of young men to play football. Sometimes it requires even more strength, courage and resolve on the part of college and university administrators not to play football.

Rift Between We and They illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The unfairness of Obamacare

Next year, when the employer mandate of Obamacare is activated, millions of Americans will be screaming in pain as their health insurance premiums skyrocket or as they lose their health insurance altogether. It will be just one more piece of the rapidly crumbling health care system that was forced upon the unsuspecting American people through political manipulation and deception.

Brave dogs in war

War dogs are more than dogs. They are testimony to what dogs are and can be.

Senate Intelligence Committee Chair Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. speaks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014, as she leaves the Senate chamber after releasing a report on the CIA's harsh interrogation techniques at secret overseas facilities after the 9/11 terror attacks. Feinstein  branded the findings a "stain on the nation's history." (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

EDITORIAL: The politics of torture

The Senate Intelligence Committee Tuesday released the results of the long anticipated investigation into the CIA's detentions and interrogation techniques in the prosecution of the "war" on Islamic terrorism, and there's something in it for nearly everyone.

The Death of Jobs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Beware of rosy job numbers

Don't be fooled by the everything's-coming-up-roses coverage that the national news media gave the Obama administration's job numbers last week.