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Illustration on the realities of gender difference by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sex, gender, confusion and distraction

Sex and gender are serious subjects, but academics, pundits and the pop media have so stretched their meanings to use as weapons of political persuasion that the words sometimes don’t mean very much. Communication becomes confusion and distraction.

The Capitol is illuminated by the rising sun in Washington, Wednesday, March 29, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

The congressmen and the counselor

Tony Hall served in Congress for 24 years, representing Ohio’s 3rd District. The Democrat left in 2002 to serve as the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Agencies for Food and Agriculture, appointed by President George W. Bush.

Trashing the Filibuster Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redeeming the filibuster

The Senate filibuster should be placed on the Endangered Species List. It is indeed endangered, and when it goes, an important element of our governmental system will go with it. Gone will be the Senate’s role as the country’s most deliberative governmental entity, where consensus reigns and the passions of the moment are subdued by calm, measured consideration of all angles and facets of any issue. It also is where vital checks can be placed on any abuse of the minority by the majority.

Cyber Warfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Warfare goes digital in the 21st century

Russia’s intelligence service hacks Democratic Party computer networks and puts out stolen emails in a bid to influence the 2016 election. China says it owns 90 percent of the South China Sea and begins building military bases under a vague historical claim to the strategic waterway. Iranian hackers break into American banks and a water control computer network at an upstate New York dam. Welcome to the new form of conflict in the 21st century: information warfare.

Ambassador to the United Nations Nikki Haley speaks at the 2017 American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) Policy Conference held at the Verizon Center in Washington, Monday, March 27, 2017. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Nikki Haley’s full-bird flip to the U.N.

- The Washington Times

Oh, Nikki Haley. What a gem you’ve become. The South Carolina flag-flap is forgiven — so, too, the endorsement of Marco Rubio for president. Kicking it hard to the United Nations has lit up her political star once again.

In this Sept. 27, 2009 photo, skulls and bones from some of the estimated 10,000 Tutsis killed in a two-day massacre at Nyamata church during the 1994 genocide, are displayed in a crypt behind the church, now a memorial to the genocide, in the town of Nyamata, Rwanda.           Associated Press photo

Why Trump’s first overseas trip should include Africa

As the first African president to address Washington’s largest annual gathering of pro-Israel activists, Rwandan leader Paul Kagame underscored a key reason for his country’s natural kinship with the Jewish state: As two peoples who survived brutal extermination campaigns, they know the real-world consequences of inaction in the face of hate.

Illustration on the ideology behind Islamist terror by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A bloody day in London town

“The Kafir’s Blood Is Halal For You, So Shed it.” That’s just one of the catchier headlines in a recent issue of Rumiyah, a slick online magazine published by the Islamic State, also known as ISIS and ISIL.

Podesta Russian Ties Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats’ double standard on ‘ties’ to Russia

- The Washington Times

Washington and the national media are all about double standards. It should come as no surprise to anyone that the sort of Russian “ties” used to condemn Republicans as possible agents of Moscow are dismissed as irrelevant when Democrats are revealed to have deeper, stronger and far more remunerative connections to Russian banks, oligarchs and institutions than any Republican currently being banished to the outer darkness by Democratic “progressives.”

Illustration on Liberal attitudes toward the Judiciary branch by Alexandewr Hunter/The Washington Times

Higher than the high court

The trials of Judge Neil M. Gorsuch, before the Senate Judiciary Committee en route almost certainly to his place on the Supreme Court, reveal one of my favorite findings regarding modern politics, to wit: The Democrats are the extremists, the Republicans are mainstream. The Democrats are the ideologues; the Republicans base their policies and political judgments usually on philosophy.

In this Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a United Airlines passenger plane lands at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. United said on Monday, March 27, 2017, that regular-paying fliers are welcome to wear leggings aboard its flights, even though two teenage girls were barred by a gate agent from boarding a flight from Denver to Minneapolis Sunday because of their attire. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)

The left and leggings

Two girls needing to change out of their leggings in order to board a United Airlines flight caused quite the kerfuffle on social media, after a “bystander” named Shannon Watts went into a tweetstorm of clueless, self-righteous indignation. In other words, she was a professional liberal activist, something else the legacy media has chosen to not mention.

Illustration on the dangers of "dawa," Islamist indoctrination by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Confronting political Islam

It is important for the United States to tackle radical Islamist ideological indoctrination — dawa — before it takes root to the extent it has in Europe.

Davey Crockett Donation to Fire Victims Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The false compassion of liberalism

Last week on CNN I debated a liberal commentator who complained that the problem with the Trump budget blueprint is that it lacks “compassion” for the poor, children and the disabled. This woman went on to ask me how I could defend a budget that would cut Meals on Wheels, after-school programs, and special-ed funding, because without the federal dollars, these vital services would go away.

Illustration on the negatives of the Paris climate accords by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward a better climate sans Paris

It’s time for the United States to pull out of the Paris climate agreement entirely. On Tuesday, President Trump signed an executive order that promoted American energy security by rolling back several overreaching Obama-era regulations that are central to the Paris climate pact.

Neil Gorsuch, the scholar and the man

To hear others speak of 10th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals Judge and Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch, it is as if the phrase “scholar and gentleman” were coined to describe him.

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In this Sept. 8, 2015, file photo, a United Airlines passenger plane lands at Newark Liberty International Airport in Newark, N.J. United said on Monday, March 27, 2017, that regular-paying fliers are welcome to wear leggings aboard its flights, even though two teenage girls were barred by a gate agent from boarding a flight from Denver to Minneapolis Sunday because of their attire. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)

Let the leggings be banned! (Burqas, too)

- The Washington Times

United Airlines, in case you missed the news cycle the last 24 hours, has stirred a major social media controversy with its demand that two little girls cover up their leggings or fly some other plane.

In this Monday, Jan. 23, 2017, file photo, White House Senior Adviser Jared Kushner, right, listens to President Donald Trump speak during a breakfast with business leaders in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. Trump is set to announce a new White House office run by his son-in-law, Kushner, that will seek to overhaul government functions using ideas from the business sector. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais, File)

Trump: Beating back bureaucracy with business

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump will announce Monday the formation of a new Office of American Innovation, to be headed by his son-in-law and senior adviser, Jared Kushner. And aside from the George Orwellian-sounding bent -- the ministries of Love, Peace, Truth and Plenty in "1984" that weren't -- it's a fine idea.

Illustration on the GOP and the Federal budget by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Republican budget woes

President Trump and Republicans in Congress have a once in a generation opportunity to dramatically roll back the frontiers of government but will likely fall short because of their lack of candor and finesse.

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump speaks at the Carrier Corp. factory in Indianapolis. The $7 million deal to save jobs at the Carrier factory in Indianapolis is poised for approval by state officials nearly four months after President Donald Trump celebrated his role in the negotiations with a post-election visit to the plant. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings, File)

Steering attention left

Meanwhile, here on Earth, mainstream websites, newspapers, TV and radio trash President Trump incessantly. Consumer confidence gallops? New jobs bulge? The stock market soars? Immaterial. The president is teetering, according to reports that so many Americans follow. Just stroll through a recent day's snippet at Yahoo and you see not one positive angle. Only these:

Illustration on U.S./Saudi cooperation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Resetting U.S.-Saudi relations

Saudi Arabia is looking forward to a resumption of strong and friendly relations with the U.S. following the recent visit of Saudi Deputy Crown Prince bin Salman with President Trump at the White House.

North Korean Nuclear War Threat Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The North Korean war scare

In 2015 the Intelligence Community declassified The 1983 Soviet "War Scare" — the definitive report by the president's Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board on how and why the USSR nearly launched a preemptive nuclear strike during the NATO theater nuclear exercise ABLE ARCHER-83, held in November 1983.

True believers never satisfied

The ongoing brouhaha about whether President Trump or his associates have been in cahoots with Vladimir Putin or Mr. Putin's thugs will never be settled to the satisfaction of some Democrats.

The first Brexit

For more than 50 years British historian John Julius Norwich has been generating scores of thoroughly researched, engagingly written books that are damned with the faint praise of being "popular" histories. This is unjust as it is wrong.

In this Feb. 1, 2012, file photo, miles of pipe ready to become part of the Keystone Pipeline are stacked in a field near Ripley, Okla. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)

Keystone moves on, slowly

The Keystone pipeline is inching slowly forward. After more than a decade of back-and-forth bickering between Republicans and Democrats, between business interests and radical environmentalists, the State Department of the Trump administration has finally given its permission, as required by law, to let the oil flow. TransCanada, the company that is building Keystone, praises the new president for clearing the stones, stumps and twigs remaining in the way.

The Republicans couldn't even fire a blank

Marching the regiment up the hill, with every musket fully loaded, and then down again without firing a shot is no way to inspire an army. Paul Ryan's Republicans, who boasted for seven years that they couldn't wait to get their hands on the Democrats and Obamacare, promising to make quick work of repeal and replace, couldn't even get close enough to fire blanks.

Turkey preventing peace in Cyprus

Turkish Foreign Minister Mevlut Cavusoglu's op-ed, "Turkey's vision for Cyprus" (Web, March 19), is fraught with misinformation that Turkey has disseminated since the start of the current settlement talks. Mr. Cavusoglu cites the many security challenges facing the Eastern Mediterranean. In doing so, however, he neglects to mention Turkey's role in fomenting regional instability vis-a-vis its cozy relationships with terrorist groups. Turkey incites further tension by violating, almost daily, the territorial naval and airspace of its NATO ally Greece. On a recent day in January, Greece's Ministry of Defense recorded 138 violations of Greek airspace that had to be intercepted over islands in the Aegean Sea.

In this Monday, Feb. 6, 2017, file photo, people hold signs during a rally to advocating to make Bridgeport a sanctuary city outside City Hall in Bridgeport, Conn. (Brian A. Pounds/Hearst Connecticut Media via AP) ** FILE **

'Sedition' suits against sanctuary schools good step

- The Washington Times

The David Horowitz Freedom Center in Los Angeles is kicking into high gear a campaign against 11 schools in California known as safe havens for illegals, telling them, in no uncertain terms: Stop the sanctuary madness. Or else we'll prosecute you "for sedition," group founder Horowitz wrote, in an online post.

In this July 7, 2016, file photo, FBI Director James B. Comey testifies before the House Oversight Committee about Hillary Clinton's email investigation, at the Capitol in Washington. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

California Dem brings on the crazy -- 'shutdown' Trump!

- The Washington Times

A Democrat in California -- a say-no-more type of phrase, if ever there was one -- has issued a fiery statement against President Donald Trump, calling on fellow crazed Democrats -- a redundant type of phrase, if ever there was one -- to subvert any and all White House policies, packages, proposals and programs.