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In this Sunday, Nov. 13, 2016, photo, a U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents pass a section of border wall in Hidalgo, Texas. The idea of a concrete wall spanning the entire 1,954-mile southwest frontier collides head-on with multiple realities, like a looping Rio Grande, fierce local resistance, and cost. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Taking back the border

Donald Trump may have shocked the world when he was elected president of the United States, but Latino voters proved to be an even bigger surprise. Election Day exit polling showed that Mr. Trump gained 2 percent more Latino voters than Mitt Romney did in 2012, winning a total 29 percent of 13 million Latino voters.

Illustration on the Obama legacy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Time

Assessing the Obama legacy

In his 2016 State of the Union address, President Obama summarized his achievements. That same night, the White House issued a press release touting Mr. Obama’s accomplishments.

Choose Your Fuel at the Pump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rethinking the ethanol standard

President-elect Donald Trump cruised to victory promising to get rid of the mandate to buy health insurance. While he’s at it, how about getting rid of the mandate to buy ethanol?

Chattering Filibuster Teeth Unhinged Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Disabling Senate filibuster abuse

Voters might justifiably assume that having now gained control of Congress and the White House, Republicans have complete power to enact all campaign promises in the last election. But without changes to the filibuster, Senate minority Democrats can still block Republican reforms.

Europe's Recent Elections Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Europe’s epochal elections

“The novelty and magnitude of Europe’s predicament make it difficult to understand, tempting to overlook, and nearly impossible to predict. Europe marches us all into terra incognita.” That’s how I closed an article 10 years ago on the topic of Islam’s future in Europe.

The key to engaging with Hispanics

I was reminded this week of 1980, when my father — who was the founder of a national organization representing the interests of Hispanic business owners — got involved with the presidential election in order to support Ronald Reagan.

Illustration on drug use in America by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

How to end America’s drug crisis

As President Trump prepares to confront multiple crises, including national security, foreign policy, and immigration, another crisis looms. It kills tens of thousands of young Americans annually, inflicting unparalleled suffering on American families.

Illustration on matching tax cuts with cuts in government spending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A model for making tax cuts work

Before President-elect Donald Trump has fully fleshed out his policy agenda, House Republicans are already planning to slam through Congress their own program of repealing Obamacare, repealing regulations Barack Obama issued in the last 60 legislative days of his administration, and enacting substantial tax cuts.

Hirohito Flag Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The incomplete legacy of Pearl Harbor

After 75 years, there are still so many stories about the attack on Pearl Harbor by the Japanese on Dec. 7, 1941, including the tragic loss of more than 2,300 American servicemen, the destruction of 18 ships, the loss of over 150 aircraft and even the element of surprise on that Sunday morning.

The BuzzFeed website is displayed on an iPad held by an Associated Press staffer in Los Angeles on Sept. 1, 2015. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Gay liberals whiff on trying to bully Christians

An important paradigm shift seems to be happening. Case in point: Typical gay liberals decide to publicly bully Christians because of their faith. Bullies then expect all hell to break loose, with targeted Christians being frightened into either disavowing aspects of their faith or, more likely, their business or livelihood being destroyed after a campaign of public hate and derision.

Nancy Pelosi (Associated Press)

The revolt of the peasants gathers steam

- The Washington Times

The populist saber continues to cut the elites down to size. The elites, who think they know it all and are uniquely qualified to tell everyone else how to live, took another pasting Sunday in the Italian elections. Prime Minister Matteo Renzi felt so humiliated by voter rejection of his proposals for constitutional reform that he quit on the spot.

Illustration on Chinese industrial pollution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump’s China challenge

President Donald Trump will reject one concept and embrace another as he confronts China on trade and pollution. He expressed skepticism for “the concept of global warming created by and for the Chinese in order to make U.S. industry noncompetitive.”

Illustration on keeping military strategy secret by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

From Churchill’s lips to Trump’s ears

In the third and final presidential debate, Republican nominee Donald Trump claimed that U.S. foreign policy regularly fails to engage “the element of surprise” when it comes to engaging the Islamic State, or ISIS. According to Mr. Trump, our enemies “have all left” the Iraqi city of Mosul because ISIS was given warning months in advance.

Trucking Delivers the Holidays Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Trucking delivers the holidays

Family gatherings with a delicious turkey on the table. Friends and communities joining together for holiday traditions. Stores and sidewalks bustling as we shop for presents to exchange with loved ones. Wreaths on doors and ornate decorations lighting up downtowns.

SEIU Local 1 union members protest for an increase in the minimum wage, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016 at the Detroit Metropolitan Airport in Romulus, Mich. Fast-food restaurant and airport workers, as well as home and child-care workers rallied in cities including Chicago, Detroit, Houston, Los Angeles, Minneapolis and New York on Tuesday morning. In many cities the protesters blocked busy intersections. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio)

The Trump challenge to Big Labor

According to the nonpartisan Center for Responsive Politics, labor unions spent more than $142 million on federal candidates, parties and outside spending trying to influence the 2016 election — more than double what they spent in 2008. Even this eye-popping figure is conservative, as it doesn’t include big spending on ballot measures and other tactics to boost voter turnout.

Related Articles

Illustration on John Bolton for Secretary of State by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Naming a secretary of state

- The Washington Times

President-elect Donald Trump is having a heckuva time deciding on who to nominate as secretary of State. It began with former New York Mayor Rudy Giuliani's insistence that he wanted and deserves the job as payback for the yeoman work he did for candidate Trump when many leading Republicans were, shall we say, less than enthusiastic in their support of his fellow New Yorker.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Absolutely on Music: Conversations with Seiji Ozawa'

Probably the two best-known Japanese cultural figures in the west are conductor Seiji Ozawa and novelist Haruki Murakami, so the very idea of listening in on their conversations entices -- the more so since Haruki Murakami invariably evokes music in his novels.

The selection of Betsy DeVos to run the Department of Education was likely an easy call for President-elect Donald Trump, who during the campaign regularly championed school choice and the charter school movement, giving a nod to school choice when announcing his pick. (Associated Press)

The administration billionaires

President-elect Donald Trump and his Cabinet nominees won't be in office until next month, but the stock market is already showing bullish signs of better days ahead under his pro-growth, tax reform agenda.

Illustration on the promotion of U.S. trade by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump's nationalism will preserve international stability

Economists and foreign policy experts fear Donald Trump's economic nationalism will disrupt the global institutions that have fostered international economic cooperation and security for seven decades and instigate chaos.

Ron Wyden (Associated Press)

The churls and their denial and grief

- The Washington Times

Life is not fair to losers, or the critics of Donald Trump, and the way he won the presidency. He just won't stand still and give the rotten eggs a chance to hit their mark.

In this Sunday, Nov. 13, 2016, photo, a U.S. Customs and Border Patrol agents pass a section of border wall in Hidalgo, Texas. The idea of a concrete wall spanning the entire 1,954-mile southwest frontier collides head-on with multiple realities, like a looping Rio Grande, fierce local resistance, and cost. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

Hell on the border

Barack Obama's legacy, intended or not, is the hell on the border that he invited and nurtures. The crisis is darker than ever, and the Obama administration seems only to know how to make it worse.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif., speaks to reporters following the House Democratic Caucus elections on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2016, for House leadership positions. Rep. Tim Ryan, D-Ohio, challenged Pelosi, but lost, 134-63. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Still out of step

"I have a special spring in my step today," Rep. Nancy Pelosi exulted on being re-elected leader of the Democratic minority, "because this opportunity is a special one, to lead the House Democrats, bring everyone together as we go forward."

Students mill about The Ohio State University student union Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, as a message board covered in community reactions stands in the main hall following an attack at on campus the previous day,  in Columbus, Ohio. Investigators are looking into whether a car-and-knife attack at Ohio State University that injured several people was an act of terror by a student who had once criticized the media for its portrayal of Muslims. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

Terrorism too close to home

On Monday, almost a dozen students were ambushed and injured by a self-radicalized, ISIS inspired terrorist. We've seen these types of attacks before, where gun-free zones have served as attack sites for those who wished to commit violent crimes or acts of terror against innocent people.

Egg on Gray Lady's face

Of all the reportage of the presidential brawl, none was more egregiously biased than that of The New York Times. The celebrated "Gray Lady" of newspapers was widely acclaimed as journalism's preeminently recognized standard bearer. But in the clash between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, the paper surrendered all pretentiousness of journalistic truthfulness and impartiality, as it went to extremes to not simply present the Democrats' position in the most admiring light but to actually become Mrs. Clinton's clarion mouthpiece.

GOP should urge recounts, too

President-elect Trump and the GOP should be cheerful warriors regarding the Democratic recounts. In fact, they should join them by asking for recounts in Virginia, Colorado and New Hampshire, as well as any other state in which a Democratic win was remotely close.

Former Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney talks with reporters after eating dinner with President-elect Donald Trump at Jean-Georges restaurant, Tuesday, Nov. 29, 2016, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The Romney infatuation

Every president deserves a Cabinet of his own choosing, barring extraordinary circumstances, and that includes President-elect Donald Trump. Every president, after all, is held responsible for the success or failure of his administration, and he by right is entitled to choose his team. But even the most powerful man in the world must be wary of mortally offending the people who fought hard and long to put him where he stands. He will need them to fight with him again.

A loaded missile launcher used by an armed group of men, not specified which group of rebels, at Syria's Quneitra border crossing between Syria and the Israeli-controlled Golan Heights, seen from the Israeli-controlled Golan Heights, Monday, Nov. 28, 2016. The Israeli military says it has carried out an air strike in Syria on a building used by Islamic State militants to attack Israeli forces. The overnight air strike Monday targeted an abandoned United Nations building that Israel says was used as a base by the militants. (AP Photo/Ariel Schalit)

Israel in the fire

Only fools play with matches. There's no scarcity of fools in the Middle East, and many of them are obsessed with playing with matches. Some may have warmed to the game with "arson intifada" in Israel. President Obama threatens to ignite a larger flame by endorsing a Palestinian state. Any number can play the arson intifada game.

Texas Border Security Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Quick fixes for border issues

Heroin deaths have crossed the 100 barrier as reported by the Police Department in Anne Arundel County, Md., on a billboard outside its headquarters in Millersville. At this rate, deaths may reach 120 by the end of the year. That would mean that 20 young residents of my county who are alive today will not live to see the New Year as a result of heroin and fentanyl illegally trafficked across the border into the United States from China and Mexico.

Illustration on Americans stopping Obama's agenda by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The party of Obama and its bitter reckoning

- The Washington Times

Eight years ago, the Democratic Party gambled that a young, inexperienced but charismatic senator could deliver the presidency and with it, sustained national electoral success. They were half-right: They got the presidency but lost the country.