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Illustration on Iranian manipulation of the U.S. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The new Persian empire

Eleven years ago, Henry Kissinger famously said that Iran’s rulers must “decide whether they are representing a cause or a nation.” If the latter, Iranian and American interests would be “compatible.” As for the former: “If Tehran insists on combining the Persian imperial tradition with contemporary Islamic fervor, then a collision with America is unavoidable.”

Illustration on Hillary's newest book by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Hillary, here is what happened’

What did I tell you? Late in November of last year, after the presidential election that finally ended the Clintons’ 24-year pursuit of power in Washington and their diminishment of the Democratic Party, I wrote that the Clintons were finished. I had consulted my sources. What is more, I reported that on election night Hillary had a “meltdown.” That is why she never showed up to thank her supporters who were milling around New York City’s Javits Center all night. Few others in the media reported it. Yet now I have still more evidence, provided by Hillary herself.

Easy Pickin's Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The real danger to U.S. national security

President Lyndon Baines Johnson (LBJ) was usually more interested in delivering tirades than seeking advice, but in February 1968 LBJ needed answers. According to Gen. William Westmoreland, the commander of U.S. Forces in Vietnam, the unanticipated Tet Offensive had transformed the Vietnam War. If LBJ wanted to win the war in Vietnam, Westmoreland and the Joint Chiefs insisted they needed 200,000 more troops.

Food as a Weapon Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to force regime change in North Korea

With the latest provocative firing by North Korea of an ICBM missile on Sept. 14, 2017 over the Japanese island of Hokkaido, it should be clear to any thinking individual that economic sanctions will not work. We have to face facts. North Korea is doing exactly what China and Russia want it to do.

A Chinese honor guard member is caught in his flag as he stands at attention during a welcome ceremony for Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Assessing Chinese imperialism

If you have not heard of One Belt, One Road you are missing what could be the landmark tale of this entire century. It is a saga of China’s grand strategy that could threaten American interests at every level.

Stem Cell Research at the NIH Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Seeking pro-life leadership at the National Institutes of Health

Dr. Francis Collins has not shown any pro-life leadership at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In fact, in an interview, Dr. Collins’ response to a congressional letter outlining pro-life members’ concerns dripped with condescension, implying that the group of 41 congressmen understood neither the science nor the ethics of embryo and stem cell experiments. Dr. Collins owes us an apology. We know the science, use the scientifically accurate terms and know the ethical facts. Dr. Collins’ positions at NIH have not been pro-life.

U.S. President Donald Trump, center, gets up to leave after making a quick statement at a meeting during the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Donald Trump, the right guy to rein in the United Nations

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump took the United Nations to task in recent remarks at the global body’s New York headquarters, telling those attending a special forum on “management, security and development” that the entity was in dire need of reform. It’s about time America snipped the U.N.’s wings.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Sept. 19, 2017

What the hurricanes teach

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma were as powerful as the big South Florida hurricanes of 1926, 1928, and 1935, but the death toll was very small compared to the earlier hurricanes in the area, even though the population is now more than 10 times the size. The Great Galveston hurricane of 1900 is estimated to have cost 6,000 to 12,000 lives. The hurricanes that have hit the U.S. in the last 50 years have resulted in relatively few lives lost, with the exception of Hurricane Katrina where an estimated 1,833 died.

Duplicitous Durbin Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Democrats try to impose a ‘religious test’

- The Washington Times

The attempted Senate mugging of Notre Dame law professor Amy Coney Barrett by Democratic Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Dick Durbin was ugly and may have amounted to an attempt to impose an unconstitutional “religious test” on a judicial nominee seeking Senate confirmation, but said more about the muggers than their intended victim.

One of 35 immigrants from 23 countries awaits the start of the naturalization ceremony that will transform them into American citizens at Northeast Jackson International Baccalaureate World Middle School in Jackson, Miss., Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. The immigrants underwent an extensive security check as well as study and testing on U.S. history, civics and government, as part of the requirements to earning citizenship documentation. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

The ignorant nation and its legacy

At a National Archives ceremony last Friday in Washington, D.C., 30 immigrants became naturalized U.S. citizens. In a video, President Trump encouraged them to embrace the “full rights, and the sacred duties, that come with American citizenship.”

Illustration on the North Korean threat by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

There’s no easy living with a nuclear-armed North Korea

We cannot learn to live with a nuclear-armed North Korea because it is a pistol aimed at our heads by the North’s dictator Kim Jong-un, China’s dictator Xi Jinping and Russia’s dictator Vladimir Putin, that sooner or later will go off.

In Praise of Asylum Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A thank you to America

On Sept. 6 at 9:57 a.m., the U.S. government accepted my application for political asylum in the United States. I want to thank the U.S. government and the great American people for taking us into their embrace and their wings at a moment when I, along with my family, am faced with the greatest adversity of my life.

The Capitol is seen at sunrise as Congress returns from the August recess to face work on immigration, the debt limit, funding the government, and help for victims of Hurricane Harvey, in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Washington’s unethical ethics watchdog

Before “fake news” there was CREW — the ridiculously self-proclaimed Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. This supposed government ethics watchdog has always been more of a partisan lapdog to left-leaning politicians. But now — according to a leaked document authored by Democratic hit man David Brock — CREW is set to dramatically expand its size and scope to be a key player in pursuit of impeaching President Trump and disrupting Republican priorities.

Related Articles

Illustration on zero sum approaches to tax reform and regulation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Toward real tax reform

The evening news and front pages are dominated by natural disasters. But our federal tax code is an unnatural disaster strangling America with long-term stagnation. To restore booming growth, America needs tax reform as proposed by President Trump and Republican Congressional leaders, who are virtually "singing off the same sheet."

Illustration on the potential for Trump's deal making by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The deals Trump must make

By dealing with Democrats to raise the debt ceiling and fund the government through December, President Trump has opened a window for bargains on taxes and infrastructure that could be attractive to both the administration and minority party in Congress.

Illustration on remedies for a sluggish recovery by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Shaping the Trump economy

America's middle-class incomes shot up by 3.2 percent last year, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, after a decade marked by the Great Recession, weak economic growth and widespread unemployment.

Illustration on Chuck Schumer's position on oil by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Chuck Schumer is running on fumes

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer evidently hasn't visited a gas station this year. If he had, he'd realize that his recent diatribe against the oil industry is based on a complete fiction.

Rep. Nancy Pelosi. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The furtive romance at the White House

- The Washington Times

Summer's almost gone, but romance is still in the air over Pennsylvania Avenue. Nancy Pelosi's dancing the night away with the devil at the White House, and Chuck Schumer, the chaperone, is making himself right at home on Donald Trump's sofa. That's Mitch McConnell sitting off to the side by himself, trying to figure out whether to look chagrined or cheery. Or at least not as superfluous as he feels.

Democratic leaders fraudulent

Tammy Bruce's recent piece, "Why Democrats fear voter fraud investigations" (Web, Sept. 13), illuminates the real motive behind Democratic resistance to investigations into voter fraud. Vowing to do this or that ad nauseam, Democrats now have the Presidential Advisory Commission in their crosshairs. Knowing full well that voter fraud exists and that it demonstrably benefits vote tabulations for Democratic candidates essentially makes the party leadership accessories to fraud.

Status quo good for politicians

In simple terms, here is the reason nothing ever gets done with politicians: Every politician runs for office on a platform of fixing all that's wrong, but if they fix those problems, what will they have to run on the next time?

New Seattle Mayor Bruce Harrell, center, gets up after signing paperwork moments after taking the oath of office for mayor Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017, in Seattle. Harrell, who was City Council president, assumed the temporary position following the resignation of Mayor Ed Murray. Murray resigned after it was reported that a fifth man, one of his cousins, had accused Murray of molesting him decades ago. Murray has vehemently denied all of the accusations against him and had already decided not to seek re-election. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

EDITORIAL: Racial injustice in Seattle

We can't ever be too sensitive about racial insensitivity, and kudos today to Larry Gossett, a member of the city council of Seattle, which is one of the most sensitive cities anywhere. Mr. Gossett is not necessarily a fan of the stinky stuff you collect on the bottom of your shoe when you step in something a dog has left on the sidewalk, but he urges caution -- and sensitivity -- about how it's cleaned up.

FILE - In this Sunday, Aug. 27, 2017, file photo, demonstrators clash during a free speech rally, in Berkeley, Calif. Police in the city of Berkeley can use pepper spray on violent demonstrators after the City Council voted Tuesday, Sept. 12, to allow police to use pepper spray to repel attacks on officers and others during the kind of violent protests that have rocked the city this year. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson)

The inconvenience of free speech

Free speech can be so inconvenient. A growing number of Democrats like the First Amendment's guarantee of the right to free speech and assembly, but only for themselves and for those who agree with them. This is a fundamental misunderstanding of the First Amendment, which does not guarantee pleasing, nice, or even responsible speech, but free speech -- even odious speech.

In this June 21, 2017, file photo, former FBI Director Robert Mueller, the special counsel probing Russian interference in the 2016 election, departs Capitol Hill following a closed-door meeting in Washington. A grand jury used by Mueller has heard secret testimony from a Russian-American lobbyist who attended a June 2016 meeting with President Donald Trump's eldest son, The Associated Press has learned. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)

For a real Russia collusion story, follow a different trail

With Special Counsel Robert Mueller now moving into tax and money laundering issues, the Russian-Trump collusion theory having proven a dry hole, it would make sense that Congress take a look at real collusion by the Russians and American politicians over the last decade, if the current hysteria over the issue is sincere.

President Donald Trump takes a question from a member of the media on the South Lawn of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017, after meeting with people impacted by Hurricane Irma in Florida. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Trump delivers to voters, even if they don't like it

- The Washington Times

Thrice now President Trump has struck a dirty deal with devious Democrats, thwarting the good governance of fellow Republicans and betraying the alliance of voters who sent him to the White House where they hoped he would just behave like a good, proper professional Republican.

A pro-Trump supporter tries to get his hat back in Portland, Ore., on September 10, 2017, after he was confronted by antifascist protesters gathering against a rally by right-aligned Patriot Prayer supporters led by Joey Gibson. Only a few Patriot Prayer members showed up and police used pepper spray after protesters pushed down a barrier separating the groups. (Photo by Alex Milan Tracy)(Sipa via AP Images)

Antifa: Yes, the violence is necessary

- The Washington Times

Antifa thugs say their violence is necessary because their goals are aimed at fighting "Nazi" ideologies, and the ends therefore justify the means. The ends justify the means -- such a powerful persuader.

Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer (right) was able to "speak New York" to President Trump, paving the way for an agreement last week to increase government borrowing and speed relief money to the hurricane victims, according to House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, who attended the meetings. (Associated Press/File)

Trump, Pelosi, Schumer DACA deal no cause for alarm -- yet

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump reportedly has struck a DACA deal with Sen. Chuck Schumer and Rep. Nancy Pelosi. And already, the left is crowing, the right is gasping, and the media is spinning madly. But let's lower the eyebrows for a moment and take a breath. This is hardly cause for conservative alarm.

Black Lives Matter protesters cover a statue of Thomas Jefferson with a tarp during a rally in front of the Rotunda at the University of Virginia on Tuesday. (Photo by Zack Wajsgras/The [Charlottesville, Va.] Daily Progress)

Jefferson under siege: Next up -- the Declaration of Independence

- The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter protesters gathered 'round the Thomas Jefferson statue that stands in front of the rotunda at the University of Virginia and shrouded the Founding Father's face, demanding "justice" as they draped a sign that read, "Black Lives Matter -- F--k White Supremacy" over the monument base. Mark my words: First Robert E. Lee. Then Jefferson. Next up will be the Declaration of Independence and America's founding and governing documents.

Illustration on Trump's recent deal with congressional Democrats by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump's option play

What just happened? President Trump cut a deal with Democrats to pay for hurricane damage relief and raise the debt ceiling without getting anything in return, except the temporary avoidance of a government shutdown. How to describe this? Was it a sellout, or a pragmatic act?