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President Barack Obama eats shave ice with daughter Malia at Island Snow, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015, in Kailua, in Hawaii during the Obama family vacation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Obama lives in ignorance of Islamic threat

- The Washington Times

President Obama has a happy and untroubled life on Fantasy Island, where he lives in splendid isolation from the world where the rest of us live. He is never troubled by terrorists, whether Islamic, Jewish or Episcopalian. All rough places have been made plain, manna falls right on time every morning, the water is pure, clear and cold, and golf courses where everybody breaks par stretch to a happy oblivion. The ants never get into his pants.

Illustration on success and college degrees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scott Walker’s real-life diploma

Without a college degree you can go on to create a computer empire like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, build an airline company like Jet Blue, found an organic food company like Whole Foods, or just become a run-of-the-mill tech nerd and create WordPress, DropBox, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Spotify, Threadless or Pinterest. But some say you can’t be president of the United States.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The war on school choice in Milwaukee

Milwaukee public schools are doing their best to block the expansion of school choice in the city—and the kids are the ones suffering.

Global Isolation of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Using boycotts to delegitimize Israel

Symbols count. For many, what they want to believe determines what they consider true. Needless to say, many in the Middle East do not want to believe in Israel’s existence. As a consequence, Harper Collins one of the world’s largest publishing houses, sold English language atlases to schools in the Middle East that omit the state of Israel.

Skilled computer hackers love Cyber Monday, and sneaky business spikes on this day. (Denver Post via Associated Press)

Getting serious about cybersecurity

The Sony attack, courtesy of North Korean-sponsored cyberterrorists, was one of the biggest media stories to end 2014. Salacious information pulled from private emails was leaked to the press, who dutifully reported the embarrassing details of individuals’ private correspondence, not to mention various trade secrets, business plans and valuable intellectual property.

Illustration on the rate of black babies being aborted in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Aborting black America

“Black lives matter” has become the slogan of anti-police protests across the nation, but the target of the protests is so misplaced that the motives of the so-called civil rights leaders behind the movement must be questioned. Do they really care about black lives? Or are they cynically exploiting isolated incidents, such as the death of Michael Brown, to inflame the black population and advance their own political interests?

An anonymous art installation showing a broken pencil is displayed on the pavement near the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015. Terror attacks by French Islamic extremists should force the country to look inward at its "ethnic apartheid," the prime minister said Tuesday as four men faced preliminary charges on suspicion of links to one of the gunmen. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Say no to walking on eggshells

People of the civilized world must say no to walking on eggshells around radical Islam and beyond.

A large component of the Obama administration's climate-change agenda is to restrict carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants. Washington regulators set a goal of reducing CO2 emissions 30 percent by 2030, which would mostly target abundant and affordable coal-fired generation. (AP Photo/Andy Wong, File)

Global climate policy after Lima

In his State of the Union address, President Obama again confirmed that “saving the climate” remains one of his top priorities. Yet the recently concluded confab in Lima, Peru, didn’t really conclude anything — certainly no binding protocol to limit emissions of carbon dioxide — but “kicked the can down the road” to the next international gabfest in Paris, scheduled for December.

Illustration on the impact of anti-Semitism on France by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘First they came for the Jews’

A widely distributed political cartoon by Ranan Lurie, published after the massacre of four Jews in a kosher supermarket in Paris, depicts a tiny shrub above ground and just below the surface, supporting the plant, is a web of thick twisted roots spread in the design of the swastika.

If you peered into your neighbor's bedroom with a high-tech device, you'd be prosecuted or sued.  MANDATORY CREDIT; MAGS OUT; TV OUT; INTERNET USE BY AP MEMBERS ONLY; NO SALES

Who will keep our freedoms safe?

While the Western world was watching and grieving over the slaughter in Paris last week, and my colleagues in the media were fomenting a meaningless debate about whether President Obama should have gone to Paris to participate in a televised parade, the feds took advantage of that diversion to reveal even more incursions into our liberties than we had known about.

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Another White House gaffe

Last Friday Secretary of State John Kerry brought James Taylor to the stage to sing "You've Got a Friend" to the French people ("John Kerry in Paris, set for James Taylor croon: 'You've Got a Friend,'" Web, Jan. 16). It was widely seen as the Obama administration's way of saying sorry after failing to send any high-level officials to the "Je Suis Charlie" March in Paris, which was attended by 2.7 million people, including 40 heads of state.

Obama's persistent tax delusion

Apparently President Obama did not get the message that he and his party were trounced in the November elections. By handing the Senate to the Republicans and providing a larger GOP majority in the House, the American people voted for divided government, meaning that they want either gridlock or cooperation and production. I believe their overwhelming support for Republicans signifies an interest in the latter, yet one would not know it from the way the president is behaving.

Remembering a Congress that worked more than it waltzed

The Congress of Vienna, begun in September 1814 and concluded in June 1815, was unique, an unprecedented Pan-European conference that laid the foundations for the post-Napoleonic age. It was also the first superpower summit.

Chips off the block

Credit card fraud is everybody's headache. If the hackers haven't got to you yet, they will. There's a new weapon against the hackers, called "chip-and-PIN technology," but replacing a billion credit cards is expensive and some of the big banks are reluctant to put out the millions (and millions) of dollars to pay for it. The federal government is using chip-and-PIN cards but not many private users in the United States have access to it.

This undated image posted online and made available on Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014 by Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently, an anti-Islamic State group organization, shows children at an Islamic State group training camp in Raqqa, Syria. The image has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting. Across the vast region in Syria and Iraq that is part of the Islamic State group's self-declared caliphate, children are being inculcated with the extremist group's radical and violent interpretation of Shariah law. (AP Photo/Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently)

When children are expendable

If children are the future, the terrorists who ravish and ravage the young in pursuit of empire portend a very bleak future in the benighted lands. Evil men continue to poison the young with the venom and bile that describe the distortions of their religion. The world stands aghast and incredulous at the violence visited upon the innocent, and at the reluctance to judge another's faith that is the mark of American tolerance. The fear of reprisal restrains many Muslims from condemning acts they know are atrocities. There is no holy writ anywhere to excuse using children as fodder for cannon. No one's God is that cynical.

Former Navy SEAL and author of the book "American Sniper" Chris Kyle poses in Midlothian, Texas. (AP Photo/The Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Paul Moseley)

‘American Sniper’ hits close to home

From the Alamo to Audie Murphy, Texans revere our war heroes. As the closing credits for "American Sniper" rolled across the screen last weekend, a packed audience lingered in the dark silence, reverent and maybe stunned by what they had just seen. The reason: The movie depiction of Navy SEAL Chris Kyle's heroic life of service provided an increasingly rare glimpse of what were once unquestioned American truths.

Illustration on The State of the Union Address by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama sings the same old song

Here's a suggestion for Joni Ernst, the new Republican senator from Iowa, who will deliver the GOP response to the State of the Union address Tuesday night. Get a chorus together and open with this old Sammy Cahn-Jule Styne number: "It seems to me I've heard that song before; it's from an old familiar score, I know it well, that melody."

U.S. must step up

As France changes its foreign policy and sends an aircraft carrier to help fight the Islamic State following the Paris terrorist attacks, American leadership is still needed to coordinate and unite 40 nations ("Key U.S. military command's Twitter, YouTube sites back online," Web, Jan. 13). Russia is building up forces facing Poland and the Baltic states and is fortifying Kaliningrad. The Islamic State and al Qaeda are planning more attacks. China continues to dominate and threaten its neighbors. Now more than ever effective leadership is needed to deal with increasing Russian aggression, the increasing radical Islamic threat and continued Chinese expansion.

Saudi Arabia funds terror

The time has come to identify the primary instigators of terrorism as being Sunni Muslims. What do the perpetrators of the USS Cole attack, the two attacks on the World Trade Center, the recent attacks in Canada, Australia and France, Osama bin Laden, Anwar al-Awlaki, the Islamic State and al Qaeda all have in common? They are all tied to Sunni terrorism, sponsored philosophically and financially by Wahhabism in Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar.

Micheal Mpubane leads a Bible study at the Progressive Primary in Johannesburg. Poor South Africans are underserved by a government that has struggled to close the gap apartheid created between white and black public schools. (Associated Press)

Learning in unexpected places

"Education for all" was set as a worldwide priority by the United Nations in 1990, to be accomplished in 25 years. The deadline is upon us and billions of dollars later, UNESCO, the cultural arm of the U.N., says there are still 175 million children in the developing world who can't read or write. This is taken as proof at the U.N. that governments must "intensify their efforts," meaning they must "intensify" the spending of more money. The facts tell a different story.

When the Nazis failed to cross the channel

The Nazi invasion of England — code-named "Operation Sea Lion" — so widely anticipated in the wake of the precipitate fall of France in June 1940 is one of the great non-happenings of history. This absorbing, detailed book by British journalist and historian Leo McKinstry shows that it might indeed have happened and explains the various reasons why it did not.

Pope Francis     Associated Press photo

Pope Francis, neither a Marxist nor an economist

Last week Pope Francis defended himself against the charges of Marxism, explaining that caring for the poor is at the heart of Christian teaching. The pope is right. Caring about the poor does not make one a Marxist. By the same logic, defense of the free market does not make one oblivious to the plight of the less fortunate.

Illustration on EPA methane regulation by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The myth of the methane menace

Last week the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) announced major new regulations on the emissions of methane into the air from oil and gas production. It calls methane a "potent" pollutant and its new rules would require a 45 percent reduction by 2025 from 2012 levels. Most Americans support these new rules, according to polling from environmental groups. This isn't surprising. Methane sounds like a dirty and dangerous pollutant and even deadly if leaked into water or the air.

Illustration on the spiritual costs of submission to evil by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The silencing of the soul

The massacre in Paris by Muslim militants at the Charlie Hebdo magazine office was about much more than freedom of speech. After all, militants also killed four hostages at a Jewish market, and that was not about freedom to buy kosher food.

The president goes to war

President Obama has gone to war. But not with the Islamic State group, Iran, North Korea or any foreign threat. Mr. Obama, at the urging of environmental extremists, has declared war on America's oil and natural gas producers. His weapon of choice is a new Environmental Protection Agency regulation to cut methane emissions by up to 45 percent by 2025.

Illustration on the exorbitant costs of maintaining detainees at Guantanamo Bay by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The reasons why Guantanamo is so expensive

In listening to President Obama and most Democrats in Congress, one might think that holding detainees at Guantanamo Bay is what's bankrupting America.

The New Hampshire Rebellion - a nonpartisan grassroots group -  wants politicians to know their state is 'not for sale." (Image from New Hampshire Rebellion)

Cold fury: 'New Hampshire Rebellion' walks 250 frozen miles to protest big money in politics

- The Washington Times

The New Hampshire Rebellion, a nonpartisan grass-roots group that has declared that the Granite State is "no longer for sale" to presidential candidates, has made good on its promise to walk over 250 miles from the four corners of the state, to eventually converge on the State House in Concord for a big rally by Wednesday. Despite freezing temperatures and challenging weather, the intrepid group is receiving a warm welcome, apparently.

FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2015 file photo, gas prices were under two dollars a gallon are seen at a service station in Leonia, N.J. A 50-percent plunge in the price of crude oil, and cheaper gas at the pump, raise critical questions about whether the Keystone XL oil pipeline is still needed or even makes financial sense. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Just say no to a gas tax hike

Echoing Nancy Pelosi in calling for a gas tax increase is not the way to brand the new GOP Congress.

FILE - In this July 1, 2013, file photo,  smoke rises from the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal burning power plant in in Colstrip, Mont. State officials planned a public meeting Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, in Colstrip on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposal to cut greenhouse emissions. The town is home to one of the largest coal-fired power plants in the West,  a 2,100-megawatt facility that churns out more greenhouse gases than any other source in Montana. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)

The energy deniers

Our "Energy Deniers" pander to the environmental fringe and dream of endless tax revenues that we will all pay for.

GOP accused of omitting Univision from 2016 debates to 'avoid uncomfortable immigration questions'

- The Washington Times

It only took a few hours for the squabbles to break out following the Republican National Committee's announcement revealing the time, place and network for the Party's nine official Republican presidential debates. Critics complained that such networks as Univision and MSNBC had been frozen out of the line-up, which is a lot skinnier than it was in 2012, when 20 debates crowded the schedule.