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Angst of the Loser Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The perennial taste of sour grapes

On her current book tour, Hillary Clinton is still blaming the Russians (among others) for her unexpected defeat in last year’s presidential election. She remains sold on a conspiracy theory that Donald Trump successfully colluded with Russian President Vladimir Putin to rig the election in Mr. Trump’s favor.

Courage and Vision of Columbus Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Good-bye, Columbus

With Columbus Day upon us leftist rage is approaching gale force. Blinded by their irrational hatred they denounce Columbus and the civilization he symbolized for every ill ever visited upon this hemisphere. They are domestic Taliban, whose goal is the cultural obliteration of our society.

A protester is silhouetted as he carries the United Nations flag during a rally against Nigerian President Buhari as pedestrians walk through federal plaza Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Charles Rex Arbogast)

Jarring minds with facts, not fists

The economics of free speech have become quite strange. It took $600,000, a sea of police officers in riot gear and concrete barricades to ensure Berkeley didn’t devolve into anarchy and chaos when conservative political commentator Ben Shapiro came to town last week. Demonstrations outside remained mostly peaceful with only nine arrests. This, however, is a troubling sign in light of what comes next on Berkeley’s campus.

Illustration on John Dickinson     The Washington Times

Planting the seeds of American independence

This year marks the 250th anniversary of one of the most influential series of writings in American history: the first of John Dickinson’s Letters from a Farmer in Pennsylvania, which appeared in 1767.

Then-first lady Barbara Bush and then-Missouri Gov. John Ashcroft attend a "Parents as Teachers" event in Florissant, Missouri, where Mrs. Bush reads to the children. (National Archives)

Reading is still fundamental, even amid hurricanes

- The Washington Times

Christian and Skyler were anxious. The 5-year-old Texas twins were set to enter kindergarten — until Hurricane Harvey ripped their world. Their school is among five north of Corpus Christi that remain shuttered, having lost heating and air conditioning systems, roofs, electrical systems and much of what ordinarily defines a schoolhouse, including children, teachers and books.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters about the Graham-Cassidy health care bill during a meeting with Egyptian President Abdel Fattah al-Sisi at the Palace Hotel during the United Nations General Assembly, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, in New York. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Trump takes leadership reins, pushes top items of agenda

First, President Trump marshalled the full attention and focus of the federal government in response to hurricanes Harvey and Irma, winning broad praise for the federal government’s response. Criticism has not come, despite the size and scope of the storms and the harsh partisan atmosphere.

Illustration on Iranian manipulation of the U.S. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The new Persian empire

Eleven years ago, Henry Kissinger famously said that Iran’s rulers must “decide whether they are representing a cause or a nation.” If the latter, Iranian and American interests would be “compatible.” As for the former: “If Tehran insists on combining the Persian imperial tradition with contemporary Islamic fervor, then a collision with America is unavoidable.”

Illustration on Hillary's newest book by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Hillary, here is what happened’

What did I tell you? Late in November of last year, after the presidential election that finally ended the Clintons’ 24-year pursuit of power in Washington and their diminishment of the Democratic Party, I wrote that the Clintons were finished. I had consulted my sources. What is more, I reported that on election night Hillary had a “meltdown.” That is why she never showed up to thank her supporters who were milling around New York City’s Javits Center all night. Few others in the media reported it. Yet now I have still more evidence, provided by Hillary herself.

Easy Pickin's Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The real danger to U.S. national security

President Lyndon Baines Johnson (LBJ) was usually more interested in delivering tirades than seeking advice, but in February 1968 LBJ needed answers. According to Gen. William Westmoreland, the commander of U.S. Forces in Vietnam, the unanticipated Tet Offensive had transformed the Vietnam War. If LBJ wanted to win the war in Vietnam, Westmoreland and the Joint Chiefs insisted they needed 200,000 more troops.

Food as a Weapon Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to force regime change in North Korea

With the latest provocative firing by North Korea of an ICBM missile on Sept. 14, 2017 over the Japanese island of Hokkaido, it should be clear to any thinking individual that economic sanctions will not work. We have to face facts. North Korea is doing exactly what China and Russia want it to do.

A Chinese honor guard member is caught in his flag as he stands at attention during a welcome ceremony for Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Assessing Chinese imperialism

If you have not heard of One Belt, One Road you are missing what could be the landmark tale of this entire century. It is a saga of China’s grand strategy that could threaten American interests at every level.

Stem Cell Research at the NIH Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Seeking pro-life leadership at the National Institutes of Health

Dr. Francis Collins has not shown any pro-life leadership at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In fact, in an interview, Dr. Collins’ response to a congressional letter outlining pro-life members’ concerns dripped with condescension, implying that the group of 41 congressmen understood neither the science nor the ethics of embryo and stem cell experiments. Dr. Collins owes us an apology. We know the science, use the scientifically accurate terms and know the ethical facts. Dr. Collins’ positions at NIH have not been pro-life.

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Illustration on American commercial and private air traffic by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

America's unfriendly skies

Liberals love to portray the Republicans as the party of the rich and powerful. The GOP has tried valiantly to shed that criticism, but then why are so many in the party defending the special interest favors that go to private and corporate jet owners over the interests of all the rest of us? Do Warren Buffett and LeBron James really need a taxpayer subsidy to jet across the country?

Boeing Looks in the Mirror Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Boeing takes on a competitor

In the most recent quarter, Boeing reported profits well-ahead of analysts' expectations and increased its earnings projections for the full year. A large part of the profit was generated by record-high production rates on the 737 aircraft, and about a $530 million cash injection from 787 orders.

Illustration on The Washington Post's appraisal of Jeff Sessions' report on U.S. violent crime by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Post deserves these four Pinocchios

In a Sept. 1 "fact check," The Washington Post claimed to evaluate Attorney General Sessions' comments about rising violent crime in the United States. Specifically, this "fact check" is of Mr. Sessions' repeated statements that "violent crime is on the rise in America, especially in our cities."

The melancholy memoir of a little engine that couldn't

There are plenty of snappy titles that Hillary Clinton might have chosen for her personal account of the 2016 presidential race. "Born to Lose," "Running on Empty," "The Sun Also Sets" and "What a Way to Go" all spring to mind. "What Happened" does not. A question mark at the end might have helped. But then people could point to the name written in oversized capital letters directly under the title on the dust jacket, concluding that the answer to "What Happened?" was "Hillary Rodham Clinton."

FILE- In this Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017 file photo, President Donald Trump, center, gestures as he greets the Amir of Kuwait Sheikh Sabah Al Ahmad Al Sabah as he arrives at the White House in Washington. Kuwait says it will expel North Korea's ambassador and four other diplomats from its embassy in Kuwait City. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

The art of no deal

Someone should lend Marc Short, the White House director of legislative affairs, a copy of President Trump's book, "The Art of the Deal." The president rightly rebuked his predecessor's negotiators and promised better ones in his own administration, but Mr. Short could use some tips. His suggestion last week that funding for the Mexican border wall doesn't necessarily have to be included in a compromise with Democrats over DACA is giving away the president's store.

Religious bigotry in the Senate

Dianne Feinstein is one of the few independent Democratic voices left in the U.S. Senate. She's a former mayor of San Francisco, and knows a nut when she sees one, and as the senior Democrat on the Senate Intelligence Committee she has learned things there that would sober anyone but the most dedicated peacenik.

Say thank-you to local eateries

Today, why not participate in National Cheeseburger Day? Ignore all health-food-police rants about how unhealthy hamburgers are and treat yourself by going to your favorite fast-food place, diner, restaurant or steak house and order a cheeseburger.

Obama still working from the shadows

Many leftists are still calling for President Trump's tax returns. This, of course, is just another ploy, like the Russian-collusion story, to try to get something on Mr. Trump that can be magnified and distorted.

City of Miami volunteers help residents fill free sandbags Thursday, Sept. 7, 2017, in Miami, as residents prepare for Hurricane Irma. A hurricane watch is now in effect for the Florida Keys and parts of South Florida. (AP Photo/Alan Diaz)

Hurricane Irma provides opportunity to expand, deepen faith in God

My heart pounded as the miraculous news about our home started to trickle in after Irma stormed across Florida. We received word from neighbors, who made it back to the tiny island where we live and work, that our home and vacation rental cottages had no significant damage. I can still scarcely believe these words as I write them.

Protesters shout before a speaking engagement by Ben Shapiro on the campus of the University of California Berkeley in Berkeley, Calif., Thursday, Sept. 14, 2017. Several streets around the University of California, Berkeley, were closed off Thursday with concrete and plastic barriers ahead of an evening appearance by the conservative commentator - the latest polarizing event to raise concerns of violence on the famously liberal campus. (AP Photo/Josh Edelson)

Scary times for free speech

- The Washington Times

Ben Shapiro just scored what today is becoming a major win -- a podium at a major university where police only had to make four protest arrests. Yes, that's sarcasm. It's also a sad commentary on the state of the First Amendment.

Illustration on zero sum approaches to tax reform and regulation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Toward real tax reform

The evening news and front pages are dominated by natural disasters. But our federal tax code is an unnatural disaster strangling America with long-term stagnation. To restore booming growth, America needs tax reform as proposed by President Trump and Republican Congressional leaders, who are virtually "singing off the same sheet."