Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on the Brexit outcome's effects on uncontrolled migration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Rule Britannia

Whether you think the United Kingdom exiting the European Union is cause for alarm or celebration, you have to concede this: Britons engaged in an open, lively and mostly peaceful debate, they turned out in droves, they cast their votes freely and fairly and, by so doing, expressed their will and determined their future. That’s called democracy. Is there a preferable alternative?

Term Limits for Congress Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The common sense of term limits

As our first president, George Washington knew that everything he did set a pattern for those who would follow. He served two terms in office, then stepped down. He declined all efforts to get him to stay.

Illustration on a proposal to create boards of directors to oversee Executive branch departments by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A remedy for overregulation

If the 2016 presidential election has proved anything so far, it’s that millions of Americans know something is seriously wrong in Washington and they want it fixed. They’re right.

Jihad Magazines Collage by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The original jihadists

They wave a menacing black banner, behead American hostages in slickly produced videos, entice hardened jihadis and thrill-seeking wannabes alike to their ranks, bust a border to establish a state and claim provinces from West Africa to Southeast Asia.

Illustration on Joyful Noise's fundraising for the Sanders campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Joyful Noise unites ‘citizens for Sanders’

Throughout this year’s presidential primary, Sen. Bernie Sanders made support for tougher campaign finance laws a cornerstone of his (now presumably concluding) campaign. His website railed against the “political campaign finance system” as “corrupt,” and “the disastrous Citizens United Supreme Court decision” as “hing[ing] on the absurd notion that money is speech, [and] corporations are people.”

Illustration on the need to identify radical Islamic's impact on homosexuality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s duty after Orlando

Americans witnessed evil once again as a radical Islamic gunman — who pledged allegiance to the Islamic State’s caliph — recently killed or wounded 102 people while they were enjoying “Latin Night” in a popular gay night club in Orlando. It was the deadliest attack on the lesbian, bisexual, gay and transgender (LBGT) community in American history.

Brexit Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Brexit’s unsettling aftermath

The British independence referendum vote on June 23 was close and, surely we all will respect the will of the British people. The British prime minister, doing the honorable thing, resigned. Yet many British people are deeply ashamed of the result, owing to the barely unspoken rationale behind many votes: immigration (very un-British), and the likely consequences.

Chicken Little

Nobody does hysteria like the media

- The Washington Times

Chicken Little will have company when the sky falls on the British isles and the world ends, which the European Union, The New York Times, The Washington Post, the BBC, CBS, NBC, ABC and Barack Obama can now say with confidence will be at 2:20 in the morning next Thursday (just in time for the late final editions).

Illustration on U.S. job opportunities and economic stagnation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Brexit’ strikes back at the elites

Last week, Britain voted to leave the European Union, freeing itself from international governance. Just as the United States would recoil at the thought of Canadians making laws that trump U.S. governance were that a provision of the North American Free Trade Agreement, Britain is evidently fed up with ceding its sovereignty to unelected bureaucrats in Brussels as part of its international agreements.

In this photo taken, March 17, 2016, people rally in front of the San Luis Obispo County government building in support of Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant in San Luis Obispo, Calif. Pacific Gas & Electric Co. and environmental groups said Tuesday, June 21, 2016, that they've reached an agreement that will close the Diablo Canyon plant, California's last nuclear power plant, by 2025. (David Middlecamp/The Tribune (of San Luis Obispo) via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

How ‘greens’ add to greenhouse gases

Listening to environmentalists talk about the threat of climate change is like hearing some lost passage of the Book of Revelation with predictions of flooded cities, wildfires, hurricanes, failing crops and swarms of disease-bearing mosquitoes.

Illustration on America's military strength versus tyranny by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The enduring strength of America

As we soon pause to celebrate the anniversary of our nation’s independence, it seems appropriate to consider the vital role played by the American military in the creation of our nation and its transformation of our world.

Illustration on the Brexit vote. (Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times)

What the British revolt signals

Oh what a difference a break makes. On Thursday, our English cousins across the pond voted to leave the European Union. For some reason, they had enough of unelected bureaucrats issuing rules and regulations ruining their lives and throwing the future in the dustbin.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's economic plans by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary pleads for four more years

“People are working harder and longer just to keep their heads above water. And to deal with the costs, the everyday costs, the costs of basics like childcare and prescription drugs that are too high. College is getting more expensive every day. And wages are still too low and inequality is too great. Good jobs in this country are still too hard to come by.”

Related Articles

FILE - In this Feb. 20, 2013, file photo, a student walks across the Lawn in front of the Rotunda at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, Va., while the Rotunda was undergoing renovation. Amid scrutiny from Congress and campus activists, colleges across the country are under growing pressure to reveal the financial investments made using their endowments. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

Why we need charter public colleges

In 2014 state community colleges and four-year colleges taught more than 13 million students, or about 76 percent of all college students in the nation. But these public institutions are in serious trouble.

Illustration on the Republican alternative to Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ryan's Obamacare liberation

Paul Ryan's House Republican Task Force on health policy reform released on Wednesday the Republican majority's unified plan to repeal and replace Obamacare. Republicans should not be shy about making this reform the centerpiece of this year's election.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton gestures as she "sighs" talking about Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump during a rally in Raleigh, N.C., Wednesday, June 22, 2016. (AP Photo/Chuck Burton)

Character no longer counts

Ranking right up there with the line, "Other than that, Mrs. Lincoln, how did you like the play?" is this recent headline in The Washington Times: "Honesty issues aside, voters still back Hillary Clinton, poll shows."

Illustration on the dangers of Obama, the ideologue by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ideologues make for dangerous politicians

Hillary Clinton is a seasoned liberal politician, but one with few core beliefs. Her positions on subjects such as gay marriage, free-trade agreements, the Keystone XL pipeline, the Iraq War, the Assad regime in Syria and the use of the term "radical Islam" all seem to hinge on what she perceives 51 percent of the public to believe on any given day.

Ensemble cast in a scene from the Broadway musical "Hamilton"

Hip-hop civics, as taught by Donald Trump and 'Hamilton'

Race matters, but it's not all that matters. That's the lesson of "Hamilton," the Broadway musical that "everyone" is pulling strings to see. (My 17-year-old grandson and I lucked out.) "Hamilton" teaches a little history, using rap and music as the sugar to make the history go down.

FILE - In this June 7,2016 file photo, Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas speaks on Capitol Hill in Washington. Democrats get their long-sought votes on gun control a week after the massacre in Orlando, Florida, but the prospects for any election-year changes in the nations laws are dim. Cornyn is pushing a measure that would allow the government to delay a gun sale to a suspected terrorist for 72 hours, but require prosecutors to go to court to show probable cause to block the sale permanently.  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Half-cocked about guns

A broken heart can be slow to heal, and the heart of a parent who has lost a child never will. The bereaved families of shooting victims deserve to assuage their grief in any way they can, and to demonstrate that their beloved did not die in vain. But it's important that sorrow not make things worse.

Much change, no hope

In 2008 I contributed $5,002 to 55 different charities. In 2015 I contributed $1,775 to 25 different charities. In seven years even my contributions to my local parish were cut almost in half. That's a 64.5-percent reduction in overall charitable giving.

GOP, not Trump, real problem

It's easy to say that Donald Trump is an obnoxious, egomaniacal buffoon, but the real story might be a little subtler and a little more complex (not that it makes him any more desirable as president).

Syrian President Bashar Assad listens to  Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu during their talks in Damascus, Syria, Saturday, June 18, 2016. Russia's defense minister visited Syria on Saturday to meet the country's leader and inspect the Russian air base there, a high-profile trip intended to underline Moscow's role in the region. (Vadim Savitsky/ Russian Defense Ministry Press Service pool photo via AP)

A misplaced protest in Syria

Fifty-one career diplomats have signed a protest to the Secretary of State and President Obama condemning U.S. policy, or lack of a good one, in Syria. Their point, that the United States should do everything it can to unseat the barbarous regime of Bashar Assad, is well taken — everywhere but at the White House.

Illustration on the need for Syrian safe zones by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reconsidering safe zones in Syria

The situation in Syria remains bleak, with no end in sight to its five-year civil war. President Bashar Assad's forces and their Russian and Iranian backers continue to lay waste to rebel-held territory, leaving the rebels with shrinking leverage to pressure the regime into a lasting political settlement.

Commanders Worth More Than Lawyers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Commanders hold the key to military justice

Some lawmakers seek to remove senior commanders from decisions to refer cases for prosecution. They would place that power with a senior military attorney in another organization, separate from the victim or the accused. Before making such a change, proponents should consider not only recent changes, but also how the proposed changes would affect the combat readiness of our armed forces.