Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on economic and technological ties between America and Israel by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The U.S.-Israel economic bond

Much of the talk around President Trump’s meeting this week with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House surrounds the political and security relationship between the two countries. That is important. But it is only part of the story. Despite having a tiny population of eight million people, Israel is playing a crucial role in helping to power the U.S. economy for the next generation.

California Claim Jumpers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why California’s mining ban is against the law

If you ask a rural Westerner how he feels about federal lands, the response will likely contain plenty of four-letter words. For decades, decisions made by faraway bureaucrats to restrict the productive uses of these lands have significantly affected nearby property owners and local economies, creating a constant source of conflict.

President Donald Trump (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Russia conundrum

Donald Trump’s presidency is in deep trouble. After nearly four weeks in office, he has yet to finish filling his administration’s top posts, and Congress is about to conduct an investigation into his ties to Russia.

CIA Bullies Trump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The CIA’s affront to Trump

The CIA has denied a security clearance to Trump National Security Council (NSC) official Robin Townley without any allegation, much less evidence of disloyalty to the United States. Quite simply, it is because the CIA disapproves of Mr. Townley’s attitude toward the agency, and this is unprecedented.

President Donald Trump calls out to the media after escorting Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu to his car to depart the White House in Washington, Wednesday, Feb. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Intellectual honesty and political indifference

Over the past weekend, Trump administration officials offered harsh criticisms of the judicial interference with the enforcement of the president’s immigration order. The Jan. 27 order suspended the immigration privileges of all refugees from Syria indefinitely and all immigrants from seven designated countries for 90 days.

ISIS Drone Attacks Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

ISIS drones could target Europe

Killer drones guided by Islamic State terrorists have made their debut in Northern Iraq, prompting concern about a new terror weapon outside of Iraq.

Illustration on the EMP threat to the U.S. from North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

North Korea, the real threat

When might North Korean develop missiles capable of striking the United States? Today.

Illustration on the Left's protests against Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The angry Loser Party

Proponents of the Women’s March and other protests that have broken out in various city centers and airport terminals across the country often compare themselves to the Tea Party movement.

Shattered Middle East Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A new approach to U.S. Middle East strategy

The Trump administration has a unique opportunity to implement a new strategic policy to bring some semblance of stability to the current Middle East chaos. Under the pledge of putting “America first,” our core national security interest in the region should include the following:

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell of Ky., center, joined from left by Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., and Sen. John Thune, R-S.D., takes questions from reporters about President Donald Trump's ousted national security adviser, Michael Flynn, Tuesday, Feb. 14, 2017, on Capitol Hill in Washington.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

An overlooked Republican empire

Donald Trump’s narrow presidential win actually masks Republicans’ growing national dominance. By focusing on the unconventional “who” and “how” of November’s presidential race, we overlook the “what” and “why” lying beneath it. Below the presidential results rests progressively stronger Republican bases at the state and congressional levels.

Related Articles

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: NFL talent still getting snubbed

I was disappointed that longtime Washington Redskins tackle Joe Jacoby was again overlooked by the Pro Football Hall of Fame ("Redskins great Joe Jacoby does not make Hall of Fame," Web, Feb. 4). The legendary "Hog," a four-time Pro Bowler (1983-1986) and three-time Super Bowl champion (XVII, XXII, XXVI), deserves the honor.

Repeal costly Obamacare now

For eight long years we Americans have waited for Obamacare to be repealed. Republicans have used the promise of repeal to get reelected. It appears this was a false promise, a betrayal.

President Donald Trump salutes back to a Marines honor guard member as he disembarks Marine One upon arrival at the White House in Washington, Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017, from a trip to Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

No sanctuary for the money

Some of our big-city mayors are having a high old time on a play date, with demonstrations of piety and righteous indignation in a game of "you show me yours and I'll show you mine." They get to needle President Trump from a distance for his attempt to impose order on the rush of illegal immigrants into the United States.

President Donald Trump walks on the South Lawn upon arrival at the White House in Washington, Sunday, Feb. 12, 2017, from a trip to Florida. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Mischief by the 9th Circuit

President Trump suggested strongly at the end of a tumultuous week that he might not appeal the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals decision upholding the trashing of his executive order limiting the admission of refugees from seven chaotic and terror-prone nations of the Middle East.

Asian Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Dealing with North Korea

Since Kim Jong-un took over from his father in December 2011 as the supreme leader, the nuclear threat from North Korea has increased exponentially. Over this five-year period, North Korea has conducted four progressively larger nuclear tests and more than 50 ballistic missile launches. In 2016 alone, North Korea conducted two nuclear tests and 25 missile launches, to include a June 2016 successful test of its Musudan Intermediate Range Ballistic missile, with a range of 4000 kilometers, and an August 2016 successful submarine-launched ballistic missile, with a range of 1000 kilometers.

Monica Crowley     Associated Press photo

Rising to Monica Crowley's defense

When CNN and Politico charged last month that Monica Crowley -- my longtime friend and editor at The Washington Times -- was a serial plagiarist, the sickening headlines left me angry. And more than slightly confused.

Revisiting the Romanovs' revolutionary capital

British historian Helen Rappaport, who has written memorably about Russia's royal Romanovs, here turns her attention to their capital city during the year when it ceased to be theirs.

Illustration on antiterrorist measures in France by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

The ACLU's war on common sense

The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) is leading the charge against President Trump's order to temporarily halt immigrants from seven Middle Eastern countries identified by the Obama administration as hotbeds of terrorism.

Illustration on the financial inequities of class action lawsuits by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Protecting consumers from swindlers

Trump administration spokeswoman Kellyanne Conway recently defended false statements about inauguration crowd size as "alternative facts," provoking a great kerfuffle. But in the class-action world, trial lawyers have been making millions on alternative facts for decades. And, astonishingly, courts disagree over whether it's permissible for lawyers to use alternative facts to cheat their consumer clients.

Illustration on the Baker/Schultz carbon tax plan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The carbon tax scam

I have nothing but respect for former Secretaries of State Jim Baker and George Schultz, but come on gentlemen: you've been snookered.

Washington faced longer odds

In terms of historical contrast, the division and opposition Donald Trump faces as president hardly measure up to the challenges George Washington faced during and even after the War of Independence. The issue of independence from Britain was by no means unanimously supported, and it proved highly divisive in all 13 of the original states. Indeed, 80,000 loyalists who rejected independence left the fledgling country during or after the war. Patriot communities went about forcing people on pain of punishment and confiscation of property to swear allegiance to the United States.

Left, not Trump supporters, violent

Over the past year the media has incessantly promoted the idea that conservatives (and more specifically "Trump supporters") have been inciting violence and hate across the country. The truth is precisely the opposite. Examining the violent crimes that have taken place in the past year reveals that the Democratic Party is responsible for inciting the violence, and that this pattern of oppression through violence is repeated throughout history as far back as the Civil War.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions, center, holds a meeting with the heads of federal law enforcement components at the Department of Justice in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 9, 2017. FBI Director James Comey sits at left and Acting Deputy Attorney General Dana Boente is at right. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, Pool)

The rant that failed

The Democrats in the U.S. Senate threw everything they could find at Jeff Sessions, including an occasional kitchen sink, but it was not enough. Rant as they might, the mild-mannered senator from Alabama, was nevertheless confirmed by a vote of 52 to 47. One Democrat, Joe Manchin of West Virginia, broke from the mob to vote to confirm him.

In this Feb. 1, 2017 photo, Anjali Lama, a transgender model from Nepal, holds a scarf up with another model as they wait to walk the ramp during Lakme Fashion week in Mumbai, India. Growing up as the fifth son in a poor farming family in rural Nepal the dream to be a fashion model came late in life. First came a long, painful struggle to accept that he felt deeply female. It was a chance encounter with a group of transgender women that turned Lama's life around by putting her in touch with the Blue Diamond Society, an advocacy group for Nepal's LGBT community. In 2005 she came out to her friends and family as a transgender woman. (AP Photo/Rafiq Maqbool)

Aborted bliss in the boudoir

The lot of a transgendered wife is not always a happy one, no matter how many genders and marriages she terminates with extreme prejudice. A cheatin' heart can hurt in the unlikeliest places.

Illustration on the results of Congressional overcomplexity on tax reform by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Changing the tax code

When it comes to changing our tax code, Washington should trust the free-enterprise system. The problem is too many politicians writing tax policy have never worked in the real world.