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Robert Mueller. (Associated Press)

The swamp strikes back

- The Washington Times

A lot of snakes and scorpions live with the alligators in the swamp, and there are even more dangerous monsters there. No swamp creature is deadlier than a Washington lawyer.

Illustration on the border wall and security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond the good news of the wall

Based upon President Trump’s promise to secure the U.S. Border with Mexico, illegal immigration plummeted during the first half of 2017. In the first three months of his presidency, illegal border crossings fell by nearly 75 percent from that of the previous year and represented a historic low in the modern history of the Border Patrol. What President Trump accomplished is nothing short of a miracle, but he can’t continue to do it alone. Border security is not the sole responsibility of the White House; it’s also the responsibility of Congress.

Turkey and NATO Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

NATO alliance helping dictators

President Trump found NATO wanting. Then true to form, he acted like a CEO, not a president, serving notice that things had to change, or else. The “or else” he left undefined, creating angst among politicians and policy elites who, sensing their own failures, chose to focus on his manners not his message. Mr. Trump’s poor political decorum notwithstanding, his policy judgment is right. NATO has to change.

Amazon Busts Through the Bricks and Mortar Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Embracing disruption and reinvention

In every age, civilizations embrace technologies that disrupt the status quo. Amazon and its internet brethren may be menacing to brick and mortar establishments but only because they make our lives richer and easier — and there is nothing new about engineers and entrepreneurs doing that.

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump greets workers during a visit to the Carrier Corp. factory in Indianapolis. More than 300 Carrier Corp. workers were being laid off Thursday, July 20, 2017, from the company's Indianapolis factory as part of an outsourcing of jobs to Mexico that drew criticism last year from then-presidential candidate Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

The benefit of putting health care aside

“It ain’t over till it’s over,” Yogi Berra said in his famous aphorism about losing. And that may eventually apply to the Republicans’ failed attempt to “repeal and replace” President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare.

President Donald Trump listens during a "Made in America," roundtable event in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, July 19, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump facing most hostile press coverage in history

Over and over again, I, and many others, have stated that President Donald Trump has received the most hostile press coverage of any sitting president in U.S. history. Democrats laughed and claimed that former President Barack Obama was treated worse, but the facts don’t lie.

Illustration contrasting Trump supporters and opponents by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The great American divide

You could call it the tale of two election reflections, two competing points of view, two American perceptions of out-of-focus reality. Two important liberal voices “looked back” this week at the November election to try to figure out how and why Donald Trump, whom “everybody” despised and “nobody” wanted to win, actually did.

Illustration on government overspending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Porking out with your money

Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to eliminate governmental waste and fraud, just released its “2017 Congressional Pig Book,” an annual publication highlighting wasteful government spending that should embarrass each and every member of Congress.

The Capitol in Washington is quiet after lawmakers departed the for the Independence Day recess, Friday, June 30, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

Republicans, thy name is mud

- The Washington Times

Republicans, as a party, are reeling at their most recent failure — an epic one — regarding repeal-replace Obamacare. Stumbling seems to be Republicans’ new mode of transportation. What’s insanely angering about it is they’re stumbling over their own roadblocks.

Illustration on the homicidal spirit behind police killings by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why the war on cops is a war on all of us

As a writer, I’ve gone out on patrol with police officers, accompanied narcotics squads on drug raids, observed detectives investigating murders and other crimes, and I’ve interviewed police commanders and commissioners in station houses and police headquarters.

Illustration of Vladimir Putin by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Putin’s playthings

About a year ago, Donald Trump Jr. met with a mysterious Russian lawyer, Natalia Veselnitskaya. Mr. Trump Jr. was purportedly eager to receive information that could damage Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign.

Lawyers' Gift from the CFPB Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A consumer bureau gift to trial lawyers

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), the arm of the government supposedly looking out for the interests of consumers, has trampled on consumers to deliver Christmas in July for the trial lawyers.

Illustration on the BNP and terrorism in Bangladesh by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Terrorism in Bangladesh under the guise of politics

The western media and several otherwise well-intentioned nongovernmental organizations routinely criticize Bangladesh for taking actions against leaders of the country’s main opposition party, the Bangladesh Nationalist Party, or BNP. They assume that accusing opposition party members with crimes is automatically undemocratic and undermines the rule of law.

This undated file photo shows writer George Orwell, author of "1984." (AP Photo, File)

Weaponizing language and communication

Fake news has become known for being a false story, gossip or even lies promulgated by the legacy media. We know what our news media establishment often delivers is nothing more than opinion masquerading as news. That in itself is a huge problem. We’re all learning about how to recognize it and how seriously to take it, if at all.

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"Why aren't the same standards placed on the Democrats. Look what Hillary Clinton may have gotten away with. Disgraceful!" President Trump tweeted Wednesday. (Associated Press/File)

America hates Hillary -- and digs Trump

Nearly every day, another mainstream media poll emerges that claims President Trump has the lowest approval rating since Caligula. But there's one person Americans like even less: Hillary Clinton.

Former Vice President Al Gore made the claim Monday that President Trump is "deliberately" making decisions that hurt America's standing on the global stage. (NBC)

Al Gore's frowny face: 'I was wrong' on Trump

- The Washington Times

Al "Hanging Chad-Man' Gore, former failed presidential candidate and former -- equally as failed, some would say -- vice president, has come crawling out of his air conditioned mansion to pick up his climate change manual once again and chide President Donald Trump on national television. His beef? It's hot -- damn hot.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions addresses the summer meeting of the nation's district attorneys from around the country at the Hilton in Minneapolis, Minn., Monday, July, 17 2017. Sessions said the Justice Department will soon make it easier for local law enforcement to seize cash and property from crime suspects and reap the proceeds. (Jerry Holt/Star Tribune via AP)

White House dead wrong on asset forfeitures

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump may be doing a lot of good for America, particularly in terms of putting the nation first on the international stage and its citizens, not special interests, first in the domestic arena. But on asset forfeiture laws, this White House is wrong. Dead wrong, completely wrong, egregiously wrong.

Un-American court demands Rowan County quit praying

- The Washington Times

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the 4th Circuit ruled 10-5 that Rowan County, North Carolina, commissioners couldn't open their government sessions with prayer. What a travesty for America, the country English writer and philosopher Gilbert Keith "G.K." Chesterton once referred to as "the only nation in the world that is founded on a creed," a creed that "clearly names the Creator as the ultimate authority.'

Harry S Truman. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

What to do with the narcissist's children

- The Washington Times

Pity the poor presidents. It's not enough for presidents to deal with enemies foreign and domestic, conduct warfare with Congress and dispense lollipops. Sometimes they have to deal with "help" from sons, daughters, brothers, in-laws and other hangers-on to the bully furniture at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue.

China Steel Dumping Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Putting American steelworkers first

As President Trump returns from his first G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, we are reminded that some countries do not want to see America grow stronger and be a beacon for freedom around the globe. During his historic inauguration speech while speaking about the decline of American industry, Mr. Trump made clear that "this American carnage stops right here and stops right now." It's clear that the carnage that has taken place in U.S. industries such as steel and aluminum needs to come to an end. As Mr. Trump has said repeatedly, we need to "buy American and hire American."

Illustration on Trump's direct communication with the American people through his Twitter messages by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

President Trump's tweets

I admit, I'm a real fan of President Trump's tweets. It's an uncensored, uninhibited and direct way for him to react and communicate "his take" on daily events. Even though his lawyers may cringe and wish he wouldn't tweet, it has changed -- forever -- the "natural order of things" in Washington D.C., a city forever in love with itself.

Illustration on the fallacious 1992 report claiming a 19 percent minimum wage increase in New Jersey raised the rate of fast food employment in that state by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When minimum wage surveys are flawed and misleading

It was "fake news" before anyone was familiar with the term: The claim that a 19 percent minimum wage increase in New Jersey in 1992 caused an increase in fast food employment compared to neighboring Pennsylvania.

Voters Registered in Perpetuity Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Tracing the range of voter fraud

The media came unhinged over President Trump's Advisory Commission on Voter Integrity. CNN falsely claimed that 44 states had stonewalled requests for voter data, when only 14 had done so. Media outlets screamed "voter intimidation!" Their fury suggests that Mr. Trump is onto something really big.

Gilbert Public Schools in Arizona is defending its decision to place pro-abstinence, anti-abortion stickers in its biology textbooks, following complaints from pro-choice parents. (Twitter/@suzanne_young)

What's up and what's down in American culture

Say you want to know which direction the numbers in the U.S. are heading when it comes to welfare dependency. Or you're curious about the divorce rate, or how bad teen drug use is. Or you're wondering about unemployment or what the high-school graduation rate is.

Loss of Freedom Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When legal protections begin to disappear

Do you mainly fear government or feel protected by it? The American Founders wrote a Constitution and designed a system of government that sharply limited the powers of the state --because they understood that the greatest danger to the liberty of the people was the necessary evil of government.

Ronald Reagan on the Tonight Show in 1975          The Washington Times

'Here's Ronnie!'

While scanning YouTube videos, I came across an appearance by Ronald Reagan on "The Tonight Show," hosted by Johnny Carson. The year was 1975 and Mr. Reagan was "between jobs," having left office as governor of California, where he served for eight years, but not yet president. He would challenge Gerald Ford for the Republican nomination in 1976, barely losing at the nominating convention, but setting himself up for what would be a successful run in 1980.

The Cromwell behind the creation of the British Empire

An unfortunate side-effect of the otherwise admirable success of Hilary Mantel's novel "Wolf Hall" and its subsequent blockbuster television and stage adaptations has been a tendency to make its protagonist, the relatively minor figure Henry VIII's chief minister Thomas Cromwell, eclipse his hitherto far more famous collateral descendant Oliver Cromwell.

Gov. Kate Brown reacts to a moment in a video played after the House of Representatives enacted Sine Die to adjourn the legislative session at the state Capitol in Salem, Ore. on Friday, July 7, 2017. The Oregon Legislature has adjourned the 2017 session that saw the passage of record-funding for schools, a long-term transportation package, gun restrictions, cost-free abortions and health care funding for Medicaid and undocumented immigrants. (Anna Reed/Statesman-Journal via AP)

Oregon's abortion business gets weirder

Oregon's state motto is "Alis volat propriis," Latin for "She flies with her own wings." It's nice sentiment, full of boast and swagger, but the bird aspires to be a cuckoo, with two left wings making it difficult to fly straight.

Who's mentally ill?

You hear more and more people claiming that President Trump is mentally ill and unfit for his office. But if we consider the sources, very often the case can be made that the accusers themselves are the mentally ill ones.

This is an undated image made available by the World Wildlife Fund Finland of a Saimaa Ringed Seal as it rests on a rock in Lake Saimaa, Finland. Wildlife conservationists in Finland are giving endangered seals in Europe's fourth largest lake a spot of online fame _ they plan to stream encounters with some of the estimated 360 remaining seals in southeastern lake of Saimaa, in a bid to raise awareness of their plight.  (Ismo Marttinen/WWF Finland via AP)

To the Finland Station

While the United States debates whether it has "a Russian problem," and who's responsible for it, 6 million wary Finns know they have such a problem. It's inherited, and they're fearful again of a wrestling match with an old foe.