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Centennial High School senior Doyle Trout, left, and his classmates react as his childhood and high school photographs appear on the screen during the senior slide show during graduation on Saturday, May 16, 2015. Trout, a four-time state wrestling champion who lost his left leg in an accident, is going to the University of Wyoming on a wrestling scholarship. Wyoming is honoring Trout's scholarship, and he hopes to wrestle again someday but doing that won't be easy.(Francis Gardler/The Journal-Star via AP) LOCAL TELEVISION OUT; KOLN-TV OUT; KGIN-TV OUT; KLKN-TV OUT

What I know: advice for the real world

Make the face you show the world—in interviews, on the job, socially and professionally—the reflection of what’s in your heart and mind.

Paula Jones smiles during a news conference in Dallas, in this April 16, 1998, file photo. Encouraged by an outside lawyer, Paula Jones is ready to insist on $2 million, half from President Clinton and half from a New York tycoon, in exchange for dropping her sexual harassment lawsuit, two legal sources involved in the case said Saturday, Oct. 17, 1998. (AP Photo/LM Otero) ** FILE **

Paula Jones: Reprise of a famous bimbo eruption

- The Washington Times

For the Republicans, worthy or not, Hillary and Bubba are the gift that keeps on giving. Whoever is responsible for writing the thank-you notes has a big job ahead. The dynamic duo keep a network of warehouses just to house and keep track of the gifts. No wonder Hillary needs her own Internet server.

Illustration on the move to remove Andrew Jackson from the twenty dollar bill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The cheap currency of judging historical figures by today’s standards

New York Times columnist Gail Collins is on a tear. Her sense of civic rectitude oozes from her prose. Her characteristic breezy haughtiness is on full display. The moral imperative that has caught her fancy and led to two columns in as many months: Getting that angular-faced Andrew Jackson off the $20 bill and replacing him with a woman, preferably an African-American or American Indian.

Illustration on Net Neutrality by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

New rules make the Internet’s future look very 20th century

Like a thief in the night, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) recently denied eight separate petitions requesting the agency delay the implementation of new Internet regulations while they are challenged in court. While the late-afternoon news dump and decision was predictable, it is no less disappointing that the Internet will soon be subjected to 20th century telephone monopoly-era regulations.

No substitute for seriousness in Iraq

A recent weekend brought two very different dispatches from the front lines of the global war on terror. The first was a tale of tactical success; the second a narrative of strategic failure.

Positive Messages Hit the Mark Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Conservatism, the Chevy of American leadership

Imagine General Motors trying to sell you a Chevy truck by airing an ad featuring a Ford F-150 pickup truck bursting into flames, killing a family of four and ending with anguished relatives waiting for news of their loved ones in a hospital emergency room.

Illustration on adjusting Section 215 of the Patriot Act by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Amending the Patriot Act, not ending it

The Senate, which will never be known for an overly demanding work schedule, returns from its week-long recess a whole day early to deal with the mess being made of one of our most important anti-terrorist intelligence programs. That program, now encompassed by Section 215 of the unfortunately named Patriot Act, has its roots in the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978, or FISA.

Illistration on adjusting Export-Import bank policies by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A Reaganesque solution to the Ex-Im Bank dilemma

Opposition to the U.S. Export-Import Bank (Ex-Im) is now at the point where the bank’s reauthorization is genuinely in doubt. Spurred by accusations of corporate welfare, crony capitalism and outright corruption, opponents believe the Ex-Im Bank’s palpable violation of free-market principles fully warrants its early demise.

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Brave women in war

For nearly a decade, American forces fighting in Afghanistan were largely blinded by a lack of intelligence from roughly half the Pashtun population of Afghanistan; that being women. Pashtunwali (the way of the Pashtun) decrees that women be protected from the eyes and presence of men not from their immediate families.

Paying heed to the walking wounded

A few days ago I received a thank you note from an American soldier who has been struggling with traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). As with many victims of TBI and PTSD, it had taken him a while to realize the true nature of his injury and to seek professional help.

Illustration on the abuse of citizens' rights under current government surveillance laws by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A better Patriot Act

Critical parts of the USA Patriot Act are about to expire. The reauthorization bill moving through Congress, the USA Freedom Act, has sparked controversy on both sides of the political aisle and within the civil-libertarian community, rekindling debates that began more than a decade ago. Now is the chance to implement much-needed reforms, including reforms to a provision not expiring: the one authorizing National Security Letters (NSL).

Export-Import Bank Providing Corporate Welfare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Chamber of Corporate Welfare

Here's a half-serious question: How much do taxpayers have to pay off Boeing to make the Export-Import Bank -- finally and irrevocably -- go away? If the feds wrote a check to Boeing for $100 million, would they then let the Ex-Im Bank die a merciful and long overdue death?

Obama, not Fox, disconnected

President Obama disarms criticism with humor. I doubt that it is his humor, of course; he likely openly borrows from his numerous writers. But if he can get you to laugh along with him and identify with his chuckle he can prevent your being disgusted by how he tears America down, insults Christianity and praises the contributions of Islam.

Saturday night with Rolling Thunder: lots of Harleys, good will, dedication (Photo by Jennifer Harper/The Washington Times)

Perfect Harleys as far as the eye can see - plus dedication and prayers for Rolling Thunder

- The Washington Times

Perfect, spotless Harley Davidsons were lined up by the hundreds around several northern Virginia hotels on Saturday night - chrome polished to mirror finish, American flags in abundance, good will in the air. In 10 hours the nearby Pentagon parking lot would fill up - the only area large enough to use as a staging area for Rolling Thunder's 28th annual "Ride for Freedom," the inimitable event that draws attention to veterans and military issues, plus POWs and those missing in action. The organization took some time together before hand however - to focus on a little business, say some prayers, recognize a few of their own and share a meal.

Bringing Children into the World Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Are embryos persons or property?

Much of the media has ridiculed businessman Nick Loeb, the former fiance of actress Sofia Vergara, the star of the sitcom "Modern Family," because he filed a lawsuit to prevent Ms. Vergara from destroying the frozen embryos they created together in 2013. But many in the pro-life community have rallied behind him, viewing the embryos that were created by Mr. Loeb and Ms. Vergara as persons deserving protection by the state.

Illustration about the abuse of Sixth Amendment rights in misdemeanor cases by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Shining a light on 10 million criminal prosecutions

Adding to the growing momentum in Congress for bipartisan criminal justice reform, last week the Senate Judiciary Committee held a first-of-its-kind hearing to shine much-needed light on pervasive -- and largely unexamined -- problems in the largest segment of our criminal justice system. Republican Chairman Chuck Grassley of Iowa heard expert testimony describing widespread violations around the country of the Sixth Amendment right to legal counsel for Americans charged with misdemeanors.

White House aide Sidney Blumenthal, shown in this video image, says during his Feb. 3, 1999, deposition that President Clinton lied to him. The videotape was part of House Manager Rep. James Rogan's, D-Calif., presentation in the Senate impeachment trial of President Clinton, Saturday, Feb. 6, 1999, in Washington. (AP Photo/APTN)

Flying as close to the flame as Hillary dares

- The Washington Times

Everything about the Clintons, both Hillary and Bubba, is a lie, including (to steal a memorable line from the author Mary McCarthy) the "a," the "and," and the "the." Neither Bubba nor Hillary know how to tell the truth, but both of them are masters at spinning the lie.

**FILE** The sign for the National Labor Relations Board is seen outside the organization's headquarters in downtown Washington on July 17, 2013. (Associated Press)

Labor board overreach

Last month, the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB), stacked with Democratic appointees loyal to Big Labor, enacted new procedures to govern unionization elections.

Bloody Hand of ISIS in the Mideast Illustration by M Ryder

ISIS attacks on the West

The May 3 assault on a Muhammad cartoon contest in Garland, Texas, prompted much discussion about the assailants' connections to the Islamic State, also know as ISIS, ISIL and Daesh. Did ISIS run them as agents? Are they part of a new network of terror in the West?

A salute to homefront heroes

Hats off to The Washington Times for using Military Appreciation Month to shine a light on the war on terror's unsung heroes -- military caregivers. These selfless individuals are the parents and siblings — but more often the spouses -- of soldiers, sailors, airmen and Marines recovering from the painful and horrific wounds of war.

What caregivers need: A plea from one hidden hero

There are 5.5 million Americans who have stepped up to become caregivers for wounded warriors, saving our nation $13.6 billion yearly in health care costs. These hidden heroes are simultaneously losing $5.9 billion in their own productivity by putting their careers, education and life as they knew it on hold when their loved one was injured or suffered from a medical illness due to serving in the military.

How America is rallying around the 'hidden heroes' who care for our wounded warriors

It's hard to believe it was just over a year ago that we released an eye-opening report from the RAND Corporation identifying the needs and gaps in support facing the "hidden heroes" of America's wars: the spouses, family members and friends who have dedicated their lives to caring for our wounded, ill and injured warriors. These brave women and men — just like the heroes they are caring for — are making a commitment of service that will stretch for decades. And yet our nation overlooked their critical role for far too long, leaving them to care for our wounded without the support they need or deserve.