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Warren G. Harding (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Donald Trump, the unstoppable force of nature — maybe

- The Washington Times

The dogs bark, the flies scatter, the gasbags at the conventions send enormous clouds of toxic waste to hover over Cleveland and Philadelphia that won’t dissipate until Labor Day, and the caravan moves on. Election Day approaches, and rarely have so many been so disappointed with the choice before us.

Fathers Absent from "Black Lives Matter" Movement Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter’s real agenda

Unless you have been “off the grid” for a while, you have heard a lot in the news about Black Lives Matter. This “movement” has gotten a lot of press and some notable praise from celebrities and politicians, including positive mentions from President Obama. But I suspect that most people, including many who have tweeted #blacklivesmatter, have not visited its website.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's position in support of the Democratic base by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton’s mixed messages

- The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter, Black Panthers, Occupy Wall Street, Socialists, Communists, those who want to strip God from their party platform, LGBTQ activists, Planned Parenthood, Hispanics, white-working class union workers, Wall Street, and climate-change mongers, all have a place in the Democratic Party.

Illustration on the relationship between Pakistani government corruption and the rise of Islamist violence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How religious extremists thrive

As Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton spar over security and foreign aid, those of us living in Pakistan wonder how we ended up in the rearview mirror of the debate. American taxpayers spend billions of dollars per year in Pakistan — a nuclear state with religious extremists baying at the door — and next door in Afghanistan, where the Taliban are ensconced.

Church and State Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending religious liberty

I write with a deep and growing concern about the future of religious liberty in the United States.

Mike Pence, Conservative Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Pence makes sense

Whenever I talk to conservatives across the country about the presidential election, a common refrain is that they find Donald Trump refreshing in many ways. They like that he eschews political correctness and promises to stand up for ordinary Americans against the elites.

SM-3 Missile Defense Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending against the growing missile threat

Both Iran and North Korea are rogue nations developing and testing new missile technologies at an alarming rate. Iran threatens U.S. forces and has missile technology to carry out those threats. North Korea has successfully tested missiles that can be fired from submarines and is threatening to use them.

Illustration on expanding health care choices for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Remodeling veterans’ health care for the 21st century

From 2007 to 2009, I served as undersecretary for health in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Overseeing the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), I often saw the best of what our nation offers veterans recovering from the wounds of war in a system staffed by committed health professionals devoted to providing quality care.

Fethullah Gulen     The Washington Times

A Gulen factor in Turkey’s turmoil?

As the dust settles in Turkey following the bloodiest coup in recent history, questions continue to surface about who was behind the recent uprising. In the midst of the unfolding drama, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accused rival Fethullah Gulen of being behind the putsch.

Clinton Scandals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A vivid symbol of scandal

Democrats gathered for their convention in Philadelphia know Hillary Clinton did not escape her latest bout with scandal unscathed. While Hillary once more remained one step ahead of the law, she is several steps behind the public. She could not have picked a worse time for her latest foray into the ethical morass.

North Korea Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho talks to a reporter after a break during the 23rd Asean Regional meeting in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Disappointment with China

China’s reaction to the decision of the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague that there was no evidence that China had exercised exclusive control over the waters or resources historically in the South China Sea was disappointing but expected.

Illustration on the Democratic National Convention by Tim Brinton

Chaos at the Democratic National Convention

Cleveland versus Philadelphia. So many predicted a cataclysmic disaster for the Republicans during their convention. Yet, it ended up being an organized, well-run event showcasing the reformation of the Republican Party and propelling Donald Trump to the biggest post-convention bounce for either party since 2000.

Related Articles

Judge, attorney corruption egregious

Cal Thomas' op-ed is spot-on about the way in which the corruption, disorder and division in our society is a reflection of what's in the hearts of each of us ("Cause and effect," Web, July 20). I don't believe the loss of Christianity is to blame because throughout history wickedness has been carried out by those who describe themselves as Christians. It is undeniable that we have lost the values, the "moral gravity that once kept us grounded, and the boundaries that kept us safe."

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Bridge Ladies: A Memoir'

Appealing is the word that kept recurring in my mind as I read literary agent and author Betsy Lerner's memoir of getting to know her mother's circle of contemporaries who have gathered each Monday yea these many long decades for lunch, bridge and much, much more.

Recent but undated handout photo issued on Friday July 22, 2016 by William and Kate, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, of Britain's Prince George with the family dog Lupo, at Sandringham in Norfolk, England. Prince George celebrates his third birthday on July 22, 2016. (Matt Porteous/Handout via AP)

An awful crime in Blighty

There's a new crisis in Old Blighty. Prince George, son of the duke and duchess of Cambridge and grandson of Queen Elizabeth II, could soon be a common felon, and he's not quite 3 years old. It's not likely, but you never know. There's photographic proof that he committed a dastardly deed.

Illegals erode more than borders

The title of Donald Lambro's recent op-ed "This bizarre election year" (Web, July 14) teased the reader into thinking the piece was a fair and balanced review of the two 2016 presidential candidates. Instead it was a one-sided attack on the basic tenets of Donald Trump's plan to control our southern border, end sanctuary havens for illegal immigrants and enforce laws to preserve employment opportunities for law-abiding citizens.

President Barack Obama pauses while speaking to members of the media in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Monday, June 13, 2016, after getting briefed on the investigation of a shooting at a nightclub in Orlando by FBI Director James Comey, Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, and other officials.  (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Barack Obama, the condolence man

President Obama tries to project a sunny outlook on the world, mostly by denying that anything bad is happening anywhere. But he's having a hard time of it staying ahead of the radical Islamic terrorists who, he says, don't really exist.

No Troops to Poland Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama must not send troops to Poland

This month, the Obama administration announced it would send 1,000 troops to Poland on a regular rotation as part of ongoing efforts to shore up the North Atlantic Treaty Organization's (NATO's) Eastern flank. These American troops, said President Obama, will "serve shoulder to shoulder with Polish soldiers" to help out one of our country's "most committed and important allies."

EPA Smog Test on Humans Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The EPA's secret whitewash

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is trying to use the prestigious National Academy of Sciences (NAS) to cover-up the agency's illegal science experiments on humans.

Police under Pressure from Radical Groups Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

'Don't defend yourselves'

As officers' families mourn the deaths of ambushed police officers in Dallas, Baton Rouge and elsewhere, the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) and some in the liberal media are doing their best to stir up yet more minority resentment against police.

Illustration on the stagnation of the Democrat party by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The late, great Democratic Party

This week the Democrats officially coronate the battered Hillary Clinton as the torch bearer for the party. She has slouched to the finish line. She is tired and the country is tired of her. Sorry, Democrats, no do-overs. You're stuck with her.

Take HSBC to task

The opening-night theme of the Republican National Convention this year was "Make America Safe Again." Perhaps the best way to help achieve this objective would be to root out all the banks that launder money to drug-trafficking cartels and terrorist organizations.

Inured to ISIS?

No one wants to see what is going on in Islamic-State-controlled Aleppo and Raqqa, Syria, but recent reports from CNN show the truth about what is happening in that war-torn part of the world. It is absolutely horrific, but I'm hesitant to share it with any of my friends because people just don't want to hear about it.

Within hours of his speech, Sen. Ted Cruz was fundraising off it, vowing that his own political movement will continue. He still has two years left before he needs to seek re-election to the Senate. (Associated Press)

Ted Cruz and an act of betrayal

Ted Cruz might have thought he was opening his 2020 campaign for president with his remarkable snub of the party and its nominee for president, but he was more likely making a deal with the undertaker.

Illustration on Ted Cruz' ploy to be "Reaganesque" by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ted Cruz's risky strategy

- The Washington Times

Texas Sen. Ted Cruz went "all in" Wednesday as he addressed the Republican Convention delegates in Cleveland, laid out his vision and pointedly ignored the opportunity to endorse the candidacy of Donald Trump. It was a risky move and may not work out as well for the ambitious Texan as he hopes.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Outfoxed: An Andy Carpenter Mystery'

"Your dog helped him escape" is a tempting kickoff for a thriller, especially when a fox terrier called Boomer is then accused of involvement in seven stabbings. It is less credible when Boomer turns out to be one of the animals under the protection of a lawyer called Andy Carpenter who cares more about canines than people.

Saudi Handgun Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The myth of Saudi support for terrorism

Last Friday, the infamous "28 pages" from the 2002 Congressional Joint Inquiry into the 9/11 attacks were declassified. For years, this final section of the report was kept from the public, which led some to believe that it contained evidence that the Saudi Arabian government was behind the attacks, either indirectly by financing al Qaeda or directly by providing support to the actual terrorists on the planes.