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Illustration positing the possible national security actions of the presidential candidates by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

National security reforms for the next president

“National security” is a highfalutin phrase for a problem that can be stated quite simply: We have enemies. What do we do about them? Since this is a matter of life and death, it’s worth asking: What national security policies can we expect the next commander in chief to implement?

Illustration on why union members should support Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why union workers should vote Republican

Unionized workers should get behind Donald Trump. Leaders of organized labor will see things differently, and that’s a tragedy for their members.

Illustration on Poland's resistance to EU dissemination of Syrian refugees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Bill Clinton’s affront to Poland

During a recent New Jersey campaign stop in support of his wife’s presidential bid, former President Bill Clinton suggested the people of Poland had decided democracy is too much trouble, and Poles want a Putin-type authoritarian leadership. His comments generated an immediate reaction from Poland’s government and the U.S.-based organization that represents about 10 million Polish-Americans.

Historian Craig Shirley tells Inside the Beltway that "President Reagan would have done everything Barack Obama is not doing" if he had been the president to take on the Islamic State. (Ronald Reagan Foundation & Presidential Library)

Drawing a conservative road map

Donald Trump is not Ronald Reagan, for whom we each worked and ardently supported because of his consistent, thoughtful, effective and eloquent conservatism. But Donald Trump is his own success story, and an American patriot committed to making America great again.

A Fix for Immigration Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fixing the immigration standoff

By and large, liberals favor amnesty for undocumented immigrants, followed by some kind of path, mostly undefined, to citizenship. Conservatives do not believe in rewarding crime — no amnesty, no citizenship — and favor deportation, where possible, or some form of punishment.

Illustration on Taiwan's efforts to fight disease by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

A partner in global health security

According to the World Health Organization (WHO) estimate released on April 21, 2004, a total of 774 lives were claimed in the SARS outbreak in 2003. Far beyond the nations where it claimed the most victims, SARS traumatized the world with vast economic disruptions, deeply impacting international trade and travel that year, and in the nervous months that followed.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Eugene, Ore., on May 6, 2016. (Associated Press) **FILE**

Negotiating the negatives

The 2016 election may go down in U.S. political history as a time when a majority of voters disliked both of their major party choices for president. Indeed, it’s hard to remember in the modern polling era when so many Americans have disapproved of even their own party’s presumptive nominees.

President Obama in Hanoi. (Associated Press)

Turning President Obama loose in Asia

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama hasn’t learned much in his seven years (and counting) in the White House, but he might have learned a little. He bowed to his Vietnamese hosts on arrival in Hanoi, but it wasn’t the infamous back-breaking 180-degree bow he gave to the despots of the Islamic world in Cairo.

Illustration on Reagan's policy impact on the Clinton economic "boom" by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How Reaganomics saved Bill Clinton’s presidency

Should Republicans discard Ronald Reagan as a relevant political figure for today? Columnist Jonah Goldberg speaks for many conservative strategists when he writes: “Ronald Reagan is dead and he’s not coming back.” He was fine for his time, a great president, says Mr. Goldberg, but we have different problems today and shouldn’t keep invoking the Gipper when searching for presidents.

In this May 20, 2016 photo, Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks at the National Rifle Association convention, in Louisville, Ky. Hillary Clinton has a message for Donald Trump: Bring it on. As Clinton's path to the Democratic nomination seems all-but-assured, friends, aides and supporters describe a candidate who is not only prepared to tune out Trump's increasingly direct attacks on her husband's personal indiscretions but believes they will eventually benefit her presidential aspirations. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

Why Trump’s temporary Muslim ban is necessary

Gen. David Petraeus is now auditioning to become Hillary Clinton’s vice presidential pick. There’s really no other way to interpret his recent column in The Washington Post, slamming Donald Trump for proposing a temporary ban on Muslim immigration.

Ravages of Heroin Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The other consequence of broken borders

“Lobos” has made another bust. Back in December, the K-9 dog Lobos and his human partner, Fayette County Texas Deputy Sheriff Sgt. Randy Thumann, made a routine stop on Interstate 10 and Lobos’ super nose turned up $4 million in liquid methamphetamine hidden in the vehicle of two Mexican nationals.

Liberal Doublespeak Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democratic doublespeak on minimum wage

Last week, the White House accepted a rare, bipartisan bill that addresses Puerto Rico’s dire fiscal condition. The territory is currently $70 billion in debt and has another $30 billion in unfunded pension liabilities. The bill would create a board to help restructure the territory’s debt obligations.

Illustration on Democrat misdirection on their record with women by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Real facts about the Democrats’ war on women

Why is the Clinton campaign obsessed about spinning what Donald Trump says about women? It’s because they’re desperate to have you not notice the damage President Obama and the Democratic Party are actually inflicting on women’s lives.

Illustration contrasting the European and American approaches to air travel security by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Lessons in the wake of EgyptAir

Thousands of missed flights. Mile-long waiting lines at airports. Then just when Americans are ready to scream over passenger screening delays, another aircraft goes down in the Middle East, hammering home the difficulty of balancing airline accessibility with security.

In this May 16, 2016, file photo, Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton waits to speak at a get out the vote event at La Gala in Bowling Green, Ky. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hillary’s enablers on the right

Is there anything more laughable than all the former members of the George W. Bush brain trust torching conservatives for getting behind Donald Trump? The stale complaint is that conservatives are tossing overboard their “core principles” when they get behind the fairly elected Republican nominee.

Related Articles

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign stop, Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2016, in Little Rock, Ark. (AP Photo/Tony Gutierrez)

When tax returns are private

Donald Trump gets right to the point. When a reporter asked him about his tax returns he had a ready response: "It's none of your business." He's right. There's no law that says a president or a presidential candidate must release the private details of his tax returns. It's become a convention for the last 30 years or so, but most presidents before Richard Nixon kept their tax issues private.

Sajeeb Wazed     The Washington Times

Bangladesh political intrigue turns personal

Ayear-and-a-half ago I received an out-of-the-blue phone call from the U.S. Department of Justice. The news was shocking: People were planning to abduct and possibly kill me.

Illustration on the removal of mandatory minimum sentencing for low-level drug convictions in Maryland by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Better criminal justice for Maryland

Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan is expected to sign legislation Thursday to combat crime and improve the state's criminal justice system. The new law, called the Justice Reinvestment Act, will eliminate mandatory minimum prison terms for low-level drug offenders, help more addicts get treatment, and reserve longer prison sentences for more serious offenders.

Hit back on RICO suit

Kudos to The Washington Times' Valerie Richardson for her reporting on the global warming industry's misdeeds ("Exxon threatened with 'climate deceit' lawsuit in latest effort to penalize dissent," Web, May 17). As for those 17 Democratic attorneys general trying to bring suit against Exxon Mobil and applying Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations (RICO) statues, it seems to me the tables could quite easily be turned.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren has become a liberal leader both literally and symbolically, as she holds Edward M. Kennedy's old Senate seat after it briefly fell into the Republican hands of Scott Brown. Enthusiasm around Mrs. Warren now resembles the wild optimism that surrounded Mr. Obama's campaign in early 2008, when he received a coveted endorsement from Kennedy. (Associated Press)

The return of Pocahontas

If the millennials can't have Bernie Sanders at the top of the Democratic ticket, Hillary Clinton is feeling the burn (if not the bern) to put Sen. Elizabeth Warren at the bottom of the ticket. This would wreathe the campaign in clouds and tendrils of estrogen, the female "gender" hormone, and give Hillary the opportunity to set two precedents in one.

Why stop at Christians?

Mark Tushnet, that learned Harvard professor of constitutional law and theory, has certainly hit the nail on the head ("Harvard professor: Start treating Christian conservatives like Nazis," Web, May 10). His recommendation that society treat conservative Christians the way we treated Nazis rings as loud and clear as a hammer blow on a crystal night.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Finding Fontainebleau: An American Boy in France'

This study in cultural affinity by an American long-resident in Paris starts out with a striking description of culture shock, as the four-year-old author experiences immersion in 1954 France. This is only one of the many odd juxtapositions in "Finding Fontainebleau," which somehow manage to end up forming a perfect union.

Facebook Under Attack Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Conservatives trend liberal over Facebook

Conservatives are hopping mad about Facebook allegedly manipulating its Trending Topics to discriminate against right-leaning news stories. And some want to do something about it. They should count to 10 and take a deep breath.

Destin Cramer, left, and Noah Rice place a new sticker on the door at the ceremonial opening of a gender neutral bathroom at Nathan Hale high school Tuesday, May 17, 2016, in Seattle. President Obama's directive ordering schools to accommodate transgender students has been controversial in some places but since 2012 Seattle has mandated that transgender students be able to use of the bathrooms and locker rooms of their choice. Nearly half of the district's 15 high schools already have gender neutral bathrooms and one high school has had a transgender bathroom for 20 years. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Obama's transgender hypocrisy

- The Washington Times

If President Obama really wants to improve the rights of LGBT persons, he should look externally and take a hard line against those countries that are murdering this population on a daily basis, instead of looking internally and picking a fight with Republicans.

New terms can't whitewash truth

The Democrats are very astute in revising their political vernacular in order to suit their politically deceptive purposes. For example, a "tax-and-spend liberal" has become a "revenue-and-investment progressive." The terms "liberal" and "progressive" are used to disguise a socialist, as evidenced by the evolution of the Democratic Party since 1968.

His story: White House adviser Ben Rhodes wrote that a main objective should be to "reinforce the president and the administration's strength." (Associated Press)

Obama's challenge of Congress

Once upon a time every congressman on Capitol Hill would have put on his fighting clothes to punish someone who not only lied to them about a subject of great national import, but boasted that he lied — and now dares Congress to do something about it.

Theatrical poster for "Clinton Cash"

A movie for Clintonites

A couple of weeks ago I heard the National Symphony perform Shostakovich's symphony commemorating war and revolution, his Symphony 11. There was not much lyricism to it, not even a dulcet tune one could leave the symphony hall whistling. It was all ominous rumbling and groaning, with the tympani madly thundering away.

'Sex change' science fiction

President Obama is deliberately ignoring a scientific fact that everyone should have learned in elementary school ("Obama administration orders transgender bathroom access in all public schools," Web, May 13).