Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on the current mixed feelings over our national heritage by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Beautiful for a patriot’s dream

Approaching the first Fourth of July in the time of Trump, a holiday Americans also call “Independence Day,” it’s hard to find much independent thinking. Polarized rages and rants follow red and blue patterns of division, deepening the fragmentation of national unity and making patriotic pride suspect. Verbal fireworks are today’s “bombs bursting in air.”

Illustration on the latest Supreme Court decisions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Two wins for Trump

The Supreme Court’s decision to allow portions of President Trump’s travel ban to proceed is a much-needed victory for the administration. The high court ruled that those “who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States” could be denied entry into the U.S. The ban targets those from six majority-Muslim countries, halting entry until “extreme vetting” can be conducted.

Illustration on the unwise course of Democrats in their attacks on President Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The progressive boomerang

The progressive strategy of investigating President Trump nonstop for Russian collusion or obstruction of justice or witness tampering so far has produced no substantial evidence of wrongdoing.

North Korea Dilemma Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

North Korea’s wake-up call

The horrific death of Otto Warmbier should be a wake-up call to the United States and China that we are failing terribly with North Korea. Kim Jong-un appears indifferent to the death of this young American held hostage in Pyongyang and with the continued detention of three Americans.

Climate-friendly Midwest Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A state-based response to climate change

Rapid environmental change is a significant global challenge with wide-reaching impacts to national security, business continuity and global health. Even as the White House withdraws the United States from the Paris Accords, the effects of climate change are already being felt today in our local communities.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., confers with Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, left, before the start of a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, June 20, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Have you heard? Warren has another regulatory overreach idea

Consider, as an important case study, Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s drive to regulate personal hearing aids, known as PSAPs (personal sound amplification products). Her legislative vehicle is the Federal Drug Administration reauthorization bill, which needs to pass in the next couple months. The bill would impose new FDA regulations on existing PSAPs, preempting state laws and regulations that have been on the books for decades.

Illustration on dealing with the rise of violent Shariaists in the U.S. after the demise of the ISIS caliphate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fending off ISIS and Shariah

Do I detect a note of desperation in how some of my fellow Americans discuss how to treat terrorism, specifically the Islamic State, or ISIS? ISIS has grown from a small group of brutes back in President Obama’s time committing various heinous crimes into a small army consisting of a few thousand, perhaps tens of thousands committing heinous crimes.

Illustration on the thought of Michael Lind by Linus Garsys/The Washington Times

A new role for America

If you’re puzzled by the swirl of geopolitical forces besetting the globe, and the debates unleashed by that swirl as to the nature of the world we will inherit or should inherit, then you must read Michael Lind’s cover article in the current issue of The National Interest.

Democrats New Hobby Horse Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats’ sudden concern for election integrity

When the Democratic Party and its deep-state allies’ favorite anti-Trump columnist begins to sour on the promise of a Russian collusion probe, it is time to start looking for a consolation prize. Based on the overnight interest in all things voting security, they seem to have found a new hobby horse.

Intrusive Government Data Collection Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Supreme Court call on the third party doctrine

This week, constitutional law experts and the law enforcement community were abuzz after the U.S. Supreme Court added Carpenter v. United States to its docket, a case that could reshape government data collection and the Fourth Amendment in the internet Age.

Tax Cutm Legislation Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Tax reform for the real world

There is an old adage that entrepreneurs often find to be true, and that is that things take three times as long and cost three times as you much as you thought. The Republicans claim they are going to get tax reform done this year — but this is not going to happen unless they do two necessary things.

Related Articles

Illustration on the real situation of Cuba by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why the new Cuba policy misses the mark

President Donald Trump announced his Cuba policy in Miami last week. I commend him for many of his efforts. He unveiled a replacement policy for the disastrous Cuba policy President Obama put into place. The highlight of Mr. Obama's policy was lifting an economic embargo that was placed after the Communist revolution of Fidel Castro brought the world to the brink of nuclear war with the Missile Crisis in 1962.

Illustration on the need to deplot THAAD by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The folly of putting protection on ice

North Korea rarely misses an opportunity to threaten or provoke us. It does so most often with the launching of one or more ballistic missiles accompanied by a harangue that the missiles would soon be launched at us armed with nuclear weapons.

Illustration on the decline of the FBI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why the FBI is hard to trust

- The Washington Times

Can anyone with a modicum of common sense trust the Federal Bureau of investigation? The answer to that question is a resounding "no." The claim that the FBI strives to be above politics is today and has always been absurd.

The Illinois Shop of Horrors Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Banana Republic of Illinois

The media has hyper-obsessed over the Kansas tax hike this year and has sold this as a repudiation of "supply side economics." But the real story in the states has been the catastrophic effects of "tax and spend" fiscal policy in Illinois.

A guidebook for Christians experiencing cultural vertigo

Those who recently attended an Easter Vigil service no doubt got a taste of what it's like to be a Christian in a post-Christian America. Perhaps a car or two idled by the throngs gathered around the paschal flame, or maybe a few people gaped and whispered, some pulling out a smartphone to record the mysterious ritual.

Another day, another investigation

Gone are the days when the losers went home after an election, to nurse their wounds, catalog their mistakes, and get ready for another round. Now an election is never over, and special prosecutors and their regiments of lawyers, egged on by the media, continue the campaign by "other means."

German Chancellor Angela Merkel speaks during a media conference at an EU summit in Brussels on Friday, June 23, 2017. European Union leaders met in Brussels on the final day of their two-day summit to focus on ways to stop migrants crossing the Mediterranean and how to uphold free trade while preventing dumping on Europe's markets. (AP Photo/Olivier Matthys)

Angela Merkel's welcome mat

Only the hard-hearted would slam the door against a refugee. Their stories are heart-breaking and their courage in seeking a better life in a new home is remarkable. Nevertheless, refugees in uncontrolled number are a headache for everyone. Germany, held up as a nation with a big heart, is learning the cost of Angela Merkel's big heart. More than a million refugees have arrived since 2015.

Saudi Arabia moving in right direction

Saudi Arabia's King Salman recently issued a royal decree, changing the name of the Saudi Bureau of Investigation and Public Prosecution to the more concise Public Prosecution. He also relieved Prince Mohammed bin Nayef of his role as minister of the interior and overseer of criminal investigations. Public prosecution now reports directly to King Salman, which will have a huge impact on Saudi Arabia's legal system.

Why no one trusts mainstream news

Last Wednesday I heard multiple radio commercials from the AARP hysterically attacking the Senate's health-care bill and urging West Virginia voters to call Sen. Shelley Moore Capito and pressure her to oppose the bill. This morning, as Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell was still on the floor of the Senate making his very first public statements about the bill, many mainstream-media outlets were publicizing a poll in which large numbers of Americans oppose the bill.

Rep. Adam Schiff, right, D-Calif., ranking member of the House Intelligence Committee, and House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., speak during the Los Angeles LGBTQ #ResistMarch, Sunday, June 11, 2017, in West Hollywood, Calif. (AP Photo/Mark J. Terrill)

Dems gnash teeth, weep, wail -- but won't change

- The Washington Times

Democrats may be floundering to understand their recent election losses. But the reasons aren't hidden. Note to Dems: Your resistance messages aren't resonating, your left-of-left viciousness is off-putting and truly, you refuse to change.

In this photo taken Sunday, June 4, 2017, a woman church leader reads from a bible in her native Bari language, at the United Church which is held in a school classroom tent, in Bidi Bidi refugee settlement in northern Uganda. The South Sudanese refugees meet in open-air churches rigged from timber with seats made only from planks of wood or logs drilled into the ground, yet these churches for the born-again Christians are oases of joy among the daily humiliations that come with rebuilding their lives. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis)

Christians battle GuideStar on 'hate group' tag

- The Washington Times

Conservative and Christian organizations dinged by GuideStar as "hate groups" have risen up and launched a counter-attack, asking the supposed nonpartisan watchdog of the nonprofit world to reverse course and remove the labels. And well GuideStar should.

President Donald Trump speaks during the Congressional Picnic on the South Lawn of the White House, Thursday, June 22, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Hallelujah -- North Korea thinks Trump's nuts

- The Washington Times

North Korea, via its state-run Communist Party newspaper, put out the message that President Donald Trump's a "psychopath" who needs to be curbed and controlled. Hallelujah. North Korea thinks Trump's a nutcase. It's just such messaging that's great for America -- that's great for America's national security.

A man passes by a TV news program showing a photo published in North Korea's Rodong Sinmun newspaper of North Korea's new type of cruise missile launch, at Seoul Railway station in Seoul, South Korea, Friday, June 9, 2017. North Korea said Friday it has tested a new type of cruise missile that could strike U.S. and South Korean warships "at will" if it is attacked, in an apparent reference to the projectiles detected by Seoul when they were launched a day earlier. The signs read "Can hit on the ground." (AP Photo/Ahn Young-joon) ** FILE **

North Korea tests rocket engine for ICBM

If there was ever a deadly challenge designed for newly elected President Donald Trump, North Korea is it. The hermit regime, which is hell-bent on threatening the United States and its allies in the Pacific with destruction, has just tested a large rocket engine that analysts believe is designed to power an intercontinental ballistic missile, you know, the kind that can destroy a U.S. city in 20 minutes.

Actor Johnny Depp introduces a film at the Glastonbury music festival at Worthy Farm, in Somerset, England, Thursday, June 22, 2017. (Photo by Grant Pollard/Invision/AP)

Johnny Depp skates on kill Trump joke -- unlike Obama clown

- The Washington Times

Johnny Depp, Hollywood movie star, made a tasteless joke about President Donald Trump's assassination, and the media yawned. But if this had been about Barack Obama, the mainstream media would be alive with rage, and the jokester would be out of work. Remember the Missouri rodeo clown?

George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The party's over and no place to call home

- The Washington Times

That's the dilemma of the Democrats, forlorn, despondent and walking in circles like the goose hit on the head with a long-handled wooden spoon. They're asking questions for which there are no happy answers in the wake of their fourth straight loss in a round of special elections.

Now they want to read

I find it laughable that the Democratic congressional members are claiming no one has had time to read or study the 1,000-page, Republican-sponsored Obamacare modification. Yet I seem to remember that in 2010, then House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged Congress to pass President Obama's 2,000-page health-care act so that Congress and all of America could "find out what's in it "

No one-party rule in Taiwan

Numerous social media accounts in Taiwan have been suspended for the 'crime' of criticizing Taiwan's government. The Taiwanese news media tend to self-regulate in order to avoid rejection of license renewal, and they hesitate to report protests or other anti-government-related events.

Illustration on the decline of medical care quality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Supporting medicine and its finest practitioners

Treating emergencies isn't your insurance talking. It's doctoring. It's nursing. It's medical technology. It's your stone-filled gallbladder obstructing and a top surgeon operating on it without delay. You can't prove that a junior attending surgeon wouldn't do just as well, but you can feel it when the wound is healing so well two days later where the angry raw organ was scope-sucked successfully from your body.