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Illustration on the fall of Yemen by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A lesson from Yemen

Last Tuesday night, President Obama assured the American people that their nation is secure because of his leadership. His “steady, persistent resolve,” Mr. Obama proclaimed in his State of the Union speech, has resulted in a “safer, more prosperous world.”

Illustration on the illusory nature of the economic recovery for the middle class by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s illusory economic recovery

The big news from this week’s State of the Union address is that the economic “crisis is over.” Apparently, we’ve been rescued from a second Great Depression and everything this president has done to fix the economy has worked. All that was missing from Mr. Obama’s celebration was the old “Icky Shuffle” end zone dance.

Illustration on school choice by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The steady progress of school choice

Sunday marked the start of National School Choice Week, an annual celebration of education reforms that give parents the power to pick the schools, public or private, that are best for their children.

Obama, General of the Free Army Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Free Stuff Army

Fresh from offering “free” health care, “free” phones and “free” food to the masses, he’s upped the bribery to “free” community college tuition and “free” child care. It’s not that the Clintons oppose any of these; they just need to affect moderation in case Hillary runs for president and has to knock back boilermakers again with the good old boys in Pennsylvania taverns.

President Barack Obama eats shave ice with daughter Malia at Island Snow, Thursday, Jan. 1, 2015, in Kailua, in Hawaii during the Obama family vacation. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Obama lives in ignorance of Islamic threat

- The Washington Times

President Obama has a happy and untroubled life on Fantasy Island, where he lives in splendid isolation from the world where the rest of us live. He is never troubled by terrorists, whether Islamic, Jewish or Episcopalian. All rough places have been made plain, manna falls right on time every morning, the water is pure, clear and cold, and golf courses where everybody breaks par stretch to a happy oblivion. The ants never get into his pants.

Illustration on success and college degrees by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Scott Walker’s real-life diploma

Without a college degree you can go on to create a computer empire like Dell, Microsoft and Apple, build an airline company like Jet Blue, found an organic food company like Whole Foods, or just become a run-of-the-mill tech nerd and create WordPress, DropBox, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Spotify, Threadless or Pinterest. But some say you can’t be president of the United States.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The war on school choice in Milwaukee

Milwaukee public schools are doing their best to block the expansion of school choice in the city—and the kids are the ones suffering.

Global Isolation of Israel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Using boycotts to delegitimize Israel

Symbols count. For many, what they want to believe determines what they consider true. Needless to say, many in the Middle East do not want to believe in Israel’s existence. As a consequence, Harper Collins one of the world’s largest publishing houses, sold English language atlases to schools in the Middle East that omit the state of Israel.

Skilled computer hackers love Cyber Monday, and sneaky business spikes on this day. (Denver Post via Associated Press)

Getting serious about cybersecurity

The Sony attack, courtesy of North Korean-sponsored cyberterrorists, was one of the biggest media stories to end 2014. Salacious information pulled from private emails was leaked to the press, who dutifully reported the embarrassing details of individuals’ private correspondence, not to mention various trade secrets, business plans and valuable intellectual property.

Illustration on the rate of black babies being aborted in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Aborting black America

“Black lives matter” has become the slogan of anti-police protests across the nation, but the target of the protests is so misplaced that the motives of the so-called civil rights leaders behind the movement must be questioned. Do they really care about black lives? Or are they cynically exploiting isolated incidents, such as the death of Michael Brown, to inflame the black population and advance their own political interests?

An anonymous art installation showing a broken pencil is displayed on the pavement near the Charlie Hebdo office in Paris, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015. Terror attacks by French Islamic extremists should force the country to look inward at its "ethnic apartheid," the prime minister said Tuesday as four men faced preliminary charges on suspicion of links to one of the gunmen. (AP Photo/Francois Mori)

Say no to walking on eggshells

People of the civilized world must say no to walking on eggshells around radical Islam and beyond.

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Micheal Mpubane leads a Bible study at the Progressive Primary in Johannesburg. Poor South Africans are underserved by a government that has struggled to close the gap apartheid created between white and black public schools. (Associated Press)

Learning in unexpected places

"Education for all" was set as a worldwide priority by the United Nations in 1990, to be accomplished in 25 years. The deadline is upon us and billions of dollars later, UNESCO, the cultural arm of the U.N., says there are still 175 million children in the developing world who can't read or write. This is taken as proof at the U.N. that governments must "intensify their efforts," meaning they must "intensify" the spending of more money. The facts tell a different story.

U.S. must step up

As France changes its foreign policy and sends an aircraft carrier to help fight the Islamic State following the Paris terrorist attacks, American leadership is still needed to coordinate and unite 40 nations ("Key U.S. military command's Twitter, YouTube sites back online," Web, Jan. 13). Russia is building up forces facing Poland and the Baltic states and is fortifying Kaliningrad. The Islamic State and al Qaeda are planning more attacks. China continues to dominate and threaten its neighbors. Now more than ever effective leadership is needed to deal with increasing Russian aggression, the increasing radical Islamic threat and continued Chinese expansion.

Saudi Arabia funds terror

The time has come to identify the primary instigators of terrorism as being Sunni Muslims. What do the perpetrators of the USS Cole attack, the two attacks on the World Trade Center, the recent attacks in Canada, Australia and France, Osama bin Laden, Anwar al-Awlaki, the Islamic State and al Qaeda all have in common? They are all tied to Sunni terrorism, sponsored philosophically and financially by Wahhabism in Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates and Qatar.

When the Nazis failed to cross the channel

The Nazi invasion of England — code-named "Operation Sea Lion" — so widely anticipated in the wake of the precipitate fall of France in June 1940 is one of the great non-happenings of history. This absorbing, detailed book by British journalist and historian Leo McKinstry shows that it might indeed have happened and explains the various reasons why it did not.

The president goes to war

President Obama has gone to war. But not with the Islamic State group, Iran, North Korea or any foreign threat. Mr. Obama, at the urging of environmental extremists, has declared war on America's oil and natural gas producers. His weapon of choice is a new Environmental Protection Agency regulation to cut methane emissions by up to 45 percent by 2025.

The New Hampshire Rebellion - a nonpartisan grassroots group -  wants politicians to know their state is 'not for sale." (Image from New Hampshire Rebellion)

Cold fury: 'New Hampshire Rebellion' walks 250 frozen miles to protest big money in politics

- The Washington Times

The New Hampshire Rebellion, a nonpartisan grass-roots group that has declared that the Granite State is "no longer for sale" to presidential candidates, has made good on its promise to walk over 250 miles from the four corners of the state, to eventually converge on the State House in Concord for a big rally by Wednesday. Despite freezing temperatures and challenging weather, the intrepid group is receiving a warm welcome, apparently.

FILE - In this Jan. 9, 2015 file photo, gas prices were under two dollars a gallon are seen at a service station in Leonia, N.J. A 50-percent plunge in the price of crude oil, and cheaper gas at the pump, raise critical questions about whether the Keystone XL oil pipeline is still needed or even makes financial sense. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Just say no to a gas tax hike

Echoing Nancy Pelosi in calling for a gas tax increase is not the way to brand the new GOP Congress.

FILE - In this July 1, 2013, file photo,  smoke rises from the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal burning power plant in in Colstrip, Mont. State officials planned a public meeting Tuesday, Sept. 30, 2014, in Colstrip on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposal to cut greenhouse emissions. The town is home to one of the largest coal-fired power plants in the West,  a 2,100-megawatt facility that churns out more greenhouse gases than any other source in Montana. (AP Photo/Matthew Brown, File)

The energy deniers

Our "Energy Deniers" pander to the environmental fringe and dream of endless tax revenues that we will all pay for.

GOP accused of omitting Univision from 2016 debates to 'avoid uncomfortable immigration questions'

- The Washington Times

It only took a few hours for the squabbles to break out following the Republican National Committee's announcement revealing the time, place and network for the Party's nine official Republican presidential debates. Critics complained that such networks as Univision and MSNBC had been frozen out of the line-up, which is a lot skinnier than it was in 2012, when 20 debates crowded the schedule.

In this Tuesday, Dec. 2, 2014 file photo, NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg gestures while speaking during a media conference prior to a meeting of the North Atlantic Council at NATO headquarters in Brussels. Leaving combat operations in Afghanistan behind, NATO is shifting its focus to Europe in 2015 and the creation of its new ultra-rapid reaction force, designed as a deterrent to Russia.  (AP Photo/Virginia Mayo, File)

NATO'S new capabilities

It's time for other NATO members to start kicking in more to help pay for their own defense.

Missouri Department of Agriculture should handle deer farms

As recently reported in The Washington Times, new legislative bills moving farmed deer under the oversight of the Department of Agriculture will be heard again this session following the controversy of last session's debates in Jefferson City, Mo. ("Missouri bill to switch oversight of deer farms returns," Web, Jan. 6). The bill is still needed because the Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC), which oversees deer farms, is pushing regulations that are designed to put the farms out of business.

Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Tom Wheeler testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington in this Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013, file photo. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)

Is the FCC unlawful?

Last year saw the publication of Philip Hamburger's new book, "Is Administrative Law Unlawful?" In his magisterial work, Mr. Hamburger claims — backed up by extensive research into English and American constitutional history — that most of the regulatory actions of our federal administrative agencies are unlawful.

Three Not-so-wise Apes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Lip service to the First Amendment

Rising from the ugly portals of dictatorship and control is the irrevocable value of open expression. Free speech, indeed the ability to make decisions for yourself, is a gift bequeathed to citizens residing with Western traditions. At times speech is hateful and tasteless — unappetizing features of freedom. But this is a price willingly paid to assure free exchange.

Men walk by a sign in Chattanooga, Tenn., promoting it as Gig City. The city's municipal fiber optic network provides Internet speeds at more than 50 times the national average. (AP Photo/Erik Schelzig)

The wrong way to a good idea

President Obama has set out to do for the Internet what he did for the nation's health care system. He's determined to destroy the Internet, which has changed the way the world works, as we know it.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (Associated Press) **FILE**

Putting spice in marriage

The language of the New Age, like a lot of things in Li'l Abner's hometown of Dogpatch, can be "amusin' but confusin'." The word "sex" has been displaced by "gender," though no one ever called Marilyn Monroe a "genderpot," and no woman we know thinks a silky black night gown will make her feel "gendery." Gov. Terry McAuliffe of Virginia thinks he can ride to the rescue of all by making the language of marriage more confusing, if not amusing.

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. (Associated Press)

Why Hillary Clinton won't run for president

Hillary can't win, and that's why she won't run. She may not know that yet herself, but a lot of Democrats want her because she's all they've got. The Republicans are counting on her to run because they think she's the candidate they can beat in what looks from here like it could be a Republican year.