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Illustration on examining voter fraud by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rooting out vote fraud

Judging by the unhinged reaction this past week to the first public meeting of President Trump’s blue-ribbon voter fraud panel, progressives are terrified.

Iranian Intentions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Certifiably wrong about Iran’s compliance

During President Trump’s campaign he said that Mr. Obama’s 2015 nuclear weapons deal with Iran was the “worst deal ever.” Although there are many diplomatic deals vying for that title, the deal engineered by Mr. Obama is at least one of the worst ever for two reasons.

How to fix the Obamacare fiasco

It’s no grand revelation that Republicans have bungled the Obamacare repeal bill beyond belief. Sen. Mitch McConnell wants a Senate vote on full repeal of Obamacare with two years to come up with a replacement. This would be the ideal solution, but it appears he lacks the necessary 50 votes for passage.

In this Feb. 28, 2017, photo, an F-15C Eagle from the California Air National Guard, 144th Fighter Wing, flies out of the nicknamed Star Wars Canyon over Death Valley National Park, Calif. Military jets roaring over national parks have long drawn complaints from hikers and campers. But in California's Death Valley, the low-flying combat aircraft skillfully zipping between the craggy landscape has become a popular attraction in the 3.3 million acre park in the Mojave Desert, 260 miles east of Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

Restoring the military’s moral underpinnings

The Trump administration came to power with a clear mandate to restore U.S. military credibility, effectiveness, and capabilities. Such a mandate involves reversing not only the debilitating impact of sequestration on our declining military force structure, but also the Obama administration’s social engineering mandates forced on our military.

Misdirected Canadian Money Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Time

The travesty of rewarding a terrorist

In July 2002, Omar Khadr was accused of throwing a hand grenade and killing a U.S. Army combat medic, Sgt. 1st Class Christopher Speer, on the battlefields of Afghanistan. Khadr was ultimately captured, linked to al Qaeda (reportedly through his father’s connections), pled guilty, and sat in a Guantanamo Bay jail cell before being repatriated by Canada in 2012.

Robert Mueller. (Associated Press)

The swamp strikes back

- The Washington Times

A lot of snakes and scorpions live with the alligators in the swamp, and there are even more dangerous monsters there. No swamp creature is deadlier than a Washington lawyer.

Illustration on the border wall and security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond the good news of the wall

Based upon President Trump’s promise to secure the U.S. Border with Mexico, illegal immigration plummeted during the first half of 2017. In the first three months of his presidency, illegal border crossings fell by nearly 75 percent from that of the previous year and represented a historic low in the modern history of the Border Patrol. What President Trump accomplished is nothing short of a miracle, but he can’t continue to do it alone. Border security is not the sole responsibility of the White House; it’s also the responsibility of Congress.

Turkey and NATO Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

NATO alliance helping dictators

President Trump found NATO wanting. Then true to form, he acted like a CEO, not a president, serving notice that things had to change, or else. The “or else” he left undefined, creating angst among politicians and policy elites who, sensing their own failures, chose to focus on his manners not his message. Mr. Trump’s poor political decorum notwithstanding, his policy judgment is right. NATO has to change.

Amazon Busts Through the Bricks and Mortar Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Embracing disruption and reinvention

In every age, civilizations embrace technologies that disrupt the status quo. Amazon and its internet brethren may be menacing to brick and mortar establishments but only because they make our lives richer and easier — and there is nothing new about engineers and entrepreneurs doing that.

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump greets workers during a visit to the Carrier Corp. factory in Indianapolis. More than 300 Carrier Corp. workers were being laid off Thursday, July 20, 2017, from the company's Indianapolis factory as part of an outsourcing of jobs to Mexico that drew criticism last year from then-presidential candidate Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

The benefit of putting health care aside

“It ain’t over till it’s over,” Yogi Berra said in his famous aphorism about losing. And that may eventually apply to the Republicans’ failed attempt to “repeal and replace” President Obama’s Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare.

President Donald Trump listens during a "Made in America," roundtable event in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, July 19, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump facing most hostile press coverage in history

Over and over again, I, and many others, have stated that President Donald Trump has received the most hostile press coverage of any sitting president in U.S. history. Democrats laughed and claimed that former President Barack Obama was treated worse, but the facts don’t lie.

Illustration contrasting Trump supporters and opponents by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The great American divide

You could call it the tale of two election reflections, two competing points of view, two American perceptions of out-of-focus reality. Two important liberal voices “looked back” this week at the November election to try to figure out how and why Donald Trump, whom “everybody” despised and “nobody” wanted to win, actually did.

Illustration on government overspending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Porking out with your money

Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to eliminate governmental waste and fraud, just released its “2017 Congressional Pig Book,” an annual publication highlighting wasteful government spending that should embarrass each and every member of Congress.

The Capitol in Washington is quiet after lawmakers departed the for the Independence Day recess, Friday, June 30, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

Republicans, thy name is mud

- The Washington Times

Republicans, as a party, are reeling at their most recent failure — an epic one — regarding repeal-replace Obamacare. Stumbling seems to be Republicans’ new mode of transportation. What’s insanely angering about it is they’re stumbling over their own roadblocks.

Related Articles

Gilbert Public Schools in Arizona is defending its decision to place pro-abstinence, anti-abortion stickers in its biology textbooks, following complaints from pro-choice parents. (Twitter/@suzanne_young)

What's up and what's down in American culture

Say you want to know which direction the numbers in the U.S. are heading when it comes to welfare dependency. Or you're curious about the divorce rate, or how bad teen drug use is. Or you're wondering about unemployment or what the high-school graduation rate is.

Loss of Freedom Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When legal protections begin to disappear

Do you mainly fear government or feel protected by it? The American Founders wrote a Constitution and designed a system of government that sharply limited the powers of the state --because they understood that the greatest danger to the liberty of the people was the necessary evil of government.

Ronald Reagan on the Tonight Show in 1975          The Washington Times

'Here's Ronnie!'

While scanning YouTube videos, I came across an appearance by Ronald Reagan on "The Tonight Show," hosted by Johnny Carson. The year was 1975 and Mr. Reagan was "between jobs," having left office as governor of California, where he served for eight years, but not yet president. He would challenge Gerald Ford for the Republican nomination in 1976, barely losing at the nominating convention, but setting himself up for what would be a successful run in 1980.

The Cromwell behind the creation of the British Empire

An unfortunate side-effect of the otherwise admirable success of Hilary Mantel's novel "Wolf Hall" and its subsequent blockbuster television and stage adaptations has been a tendency to make its protagonist, the relatively minor figure Henry VIII's chief minister Thomas Cromwell, eclipse his hitherto far more famous collateral descendant Oliver Cromwell.

Gov. Kate Brown reacts to a moment in a video played after the House of Representatives enacted Sine Die to adjourn the legislative session at the state Capitol in Salem, Ore. on Friday, July 7, 2017. The Oregon Legislature has adjourned the 2017 session that saw the passage of record-funding for schools, a long-term transportation package, gun restrictions, cost-free abortions and health care funding for Medicaid and undocumented immigrants. (Anna Reed/Statesman-Journal via AP)

Oregon's abortion business gets weirder

Oregon's state motto is "Alis volat propriis," Latin for "She flies with her own wings." It's nice sentiment, full of boast and swagger, but the bird aspires to be a cuckoo, with two left wings making it difficult to fly straight.

Who's mentally ill?

You hear more and more people claiming that President Trump is mentally ill and unfit for his office. But if we consider the sources, very often the case can be made that the accusers themselves are the mentally ill ones.

This is an undated image made available by the World Wildlife Fund Finland of a Saimaa Ringed Seal as it rests on a rock in Lake Saimaa, Finland. Wildlife conservationists in Finland are giving endangered seals in Europe's fourth largest lake a spot of online fame _ they plan to stream encounters with some of the estimated 360 remaining seals in southeastern lake of Saimaa, in a bid to raise awareness of their plight.  (Ismo Marttinen/WWF Finland via AP)

To the Finland Station

While the United States debates whether it has "a Russian problem," and who's responsible for it, 6 million wary Finns know they have such a problem. It's inherited, and they're fearful again of a wrestling match with an old foe.

Make states pay for illegal voting

To their everlasting shame, California and other liberal states have refused to release data on voters to President Trump's voter fraud commission. This is understandable considering that the number of illegal aliens voting in our elections was recently estimated at 5.7 million. Illegal-alien voter fraud is undoubtedly the only way that Democrats can win with the country so evenly divided. That's why they pander to illegals with welfare entitlements, sanctuary cities and open borders.

In this May 10, 2016, file photo, North Korean leader Kim Jong-un waves at parade participants at the Kim Il-sung Square in Pyongyang, North Korea. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E, File)

North Korea may have more nuclear weapons material than previously thought

- The Washington Times

North Korea may have produced more nuclear bomb-making material than analysts previously thought, according to a report by the website, 38 North. Thermal images taken of the Yongbyon nuclear plant from September to the end of June show that increased production of plutonium, as well as enriched uranium, was possible.

Caitlyn Jenner poses for a portrait on Monday, April 24, 2017, in New York to promote her memoir, "The Secrets of My Life." (Photo by Taylor Jewell/Invision/AP)

Caitlyn Jenner on mission to sensitize GOP

- The Washington Times

The Jenner formerly known as Bruce, but name-changed to Caitlyn, is on a mission to change the Republican Party and make its members more sensitive to LGBT issues. That's fine and dandy. But sensitive shouldn't mean lying.

In this Feb. 10, 2012, file photo, Ann Coulter gestures while speaking at the Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) in Washington. Delta pushed back at Coulter after the conservative commentator berated the carrier on Twitter over a changed seat assignment for a July 15, 2017, flight from New York to West Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

Delta's ticked -- but Ann Coulter's right

- The Washington Times

Ann Coulter unleashed a storm of fiery tweets against Delta over a switched seat. And an offended Delta tried to defend itself. But Coulter's quite right and moreover, Americans are sick of being treated by airlines like chattel.

Nothing Burger Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Charging treason and ruining a republic

The latest nothingburger ablaze on the media grill is that Donald Trump Jr. may have committed treason when he met with a woman he believed to be an agent of the Russian government who claimed to possess information that Hillary Clinton had colluded with that country.

Illustration on the Cruz Amendment by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How Ted Cruz rescued Republicans on Obamacare

Finally, Republicans are getting smart on Obamacare. It took one of the savviest Republican senators --Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas with an assist from Sen. Mike Lee of Utah -- to get the GOP to figure out how to replace Obamacare, reduce premiums and save money for the government -- all without alienating millions of voters. He's pulled the Republicans' fannies out of the fire by flipping a political losing strategy into a big time winner.

Sudanese Genocide War Criminal Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Putting Sudan on notice

If you were told that an indicted war criminal who is responsible for the death of thousands of Sudanese citizens should be allowed to gain the economic benefits of trading with the U.S., what would you say? On July 12 the Trump administration postponed a decision for 90 days on whether to continue to implement Executive Order 13761 regarding sanctions on Sudan that were established as the result of decades of violence, genocide and crimes against humanity.

Illustration on the IRGC by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran's terrorism goliath

ISIS has captivated Western attention for so long with its gruesome beheadings, stabbings, vehicular homicides, shootings and bombings in Europe and the United States, the horrific aftermaths deservedly the focus of television news, that virtually forgotten is the world's biggest terror threat -- Iran's IRGC, the Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps.

'Green' power land, cash greedy

"Why the Greens hate nuclear power" (Web, July 9) paints a grim picture of a United States without full-time electric power from coal, natural gas and nuclear generation. Unfortunately, the situation at hand is even worse than that.

The mathematical prodigy who gave the world 'bits'

Many people, most notably Al Gore, have claimed to be the father of the information age; but Claude Shannon probably deserves the most credit. In 1948, he wrote an article that is considered to be the "Magna Carta" of information technology. In their book "A Mind at Play," Jimmy Son and Rob Goodman explain how this nearly forgotten American genius revolutionized the way we think about communications.