Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Sheldon Adelson. (Associated Press)

Now it’s time to pay for the fun

- The Washington Times

Money is not the mother’s milk of politics, as the bundler’s cliche goes, but homemade vanilla ice cream, rich and creamy. Donald Trump hasn’t been getting any. Not much and not lately, anyway.

Saudi Handgun Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The myth of Saudi support for terrorism

Last Friday, the infamous “28 pages” from the 2002 Congressional Joint Inquiry into the 9/11 attacks were declassified. For years, this final section of the report was kept from the public, which led some to believe that it contained evidence that the Saudi Arabian government was behind the attacks, either indirectly by financing al Qaeda or directly by providing support to the actual terrorists on the planes.

Illustration of Ted Cruz as Brutus by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ted Cruz writes a political suicide note

- The Washington Times

Cleveland — As Charles Krauthammer put it, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz wrote “the longest suicide note in U.S. History,” and it was a disjointed, contradictory one that revealed a deeply conflicted and narcissistic man. A principled stand for the party and country? Hardly.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a press conference with Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson at the Foreign Office in London, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool)

The nightmarish results of Muslim outreach

When President Obama entered office, he dreamed that his hope-and-change messaging and his references to his familial Islamic roots would win over the Muslim world. The soon-to-be Nobel Peace Prize laureate would make the United States liked in the Middle East. Then terrorism would decrease.

Iran Missile Factory Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Iran delusions

July 14 was the first anniversary of President Obama’s nuclear agreement with Iran. Because the agreement renders our intelligence community deaf and blind to Iran’s nuclear weapons program, the new report from a German intelligence agency that Iran is violating the deal comes as no surprise.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton addresses the The National Education Association (NEA) Representative Assembly in Washington, Tuesday, July 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

Apple polishing on the stump

Hillary Clinton took pandering to a new level when she addressed delegates to the National Education Association’s (NEA) convention on July 5.

Illustration on the loss of fighting spirit in the U.S. armed forces by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Don’t give up the ship’

The recent release of the investigative report on the “surrender” of two U.S. Navy heavily armed, 48-foot Riverine Coastal Patrol Boats in the North Arabian Sea on Jan. 12 to slightly smaller, armed Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps Navy center-console fishing-type boats was more than an embarrassment for the Navy.

Illustration on Trump's acceptance speech by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The speech Donald Trump should give tonight to win it all

- The Washington Times

Tonight in Cleveland, Donald Trump will accept the Republican nomination for president of the United States. His ascent is the most astonishing political story of our lifetimes, and he achieved it with breathtaking fearlessness, cleverness, wit and smarts. Most importantly, he had from the start an extraordinary sixth sense of the anger, betrayal and anxiety roiling voters and driving their desire to smash the existing order.

Erdogan and the Brotherhood Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The jihadis in France, the Islamists in Turkey

Streets ran red with blood in both France and Turkey last week. A terrorist atrocity and an attempted coup are quite different events. But underlying both is this question: How are the most dynamic forces within the Islamic world shaping the 21st century?

Anti-EU Movement Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Europe’s challenge after Brexit

New surveys released this week by Britain’s EEF manufacturers’ organization and by PricewaterhouseCoopers predict that the United Kingdom’s June 23 vote to leave the European Union will result in economic slowdown. That may or may not prove true.

Election Day Turnout for Trump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Patrick Henry moment

In his column, “The election to terrify us all,” Wesley Pruden warns, “This might be remembered as the year when they gave an election and nobody came. The millions stayed home, the champagne went uncorked, and everybody lived in semi-misery ever after.”

Shia, Sunni and Christian Iraqis pray together in Baghdad at the site of the July 6 truck bombing, the worst such attack since 2003. Associated Press photo

Iraqis united by atrocity

The hell of jihadi terrorism is burning in the hearts of Iraqi citizens even weeks after the worst-ever terror bombing in Baghdad on July 3. The death count is now well above 300, including 172 people whose corpses could only be identified by DNA tests.

Illustration on the relationship between honor killings an Islamist terrorism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Honor killings’ and Islamic terrorism

The world is in chaos, as Islamic violence is setting the tone with terrorism. Whether it be Orlando or Nice or the Bavarian train slasher, we’re all told it was a “lone wolf” transformed into a monster by “radicalization,” one of the left’s favorite fabricated explanations.

Related Articles

Gen. David Petraeus. ** File (Associated Press)

Why Obama must pardon Gen. David Petraeus

Anyone who served in the military understands the underlying principle of getting the bottom line up front. Because in a war zone there is always a chance the "messenger" might not get to complete their report or dispatch due to hostile fire.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in Hampton, Va. (AP Photo/Steve Helber, File)

Mortal wounds for TPP

The Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP in the jargon of the trade negotiators, looks dead. The cosmeticians at the mortuary say so. Both Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are competing to preside over the funeral but U.S. Trade Ambassador Michael Froman says he and his colleagues are hearing encouraging noises from various members of Congress. He thinks that the deal may soon move forward.

Indiana Gov. Mike Pence speaks during the Innovation Showcase, Thursday, July 14, 2016, in Indianapolis. (AP Photo/Darron Cummings)

The Pence choice

Unless he changed his mind overnight -- and "Surprise" and "Unpredictability" are his middle names -- Donald Trump finally picked his running mate and by all accounts it's a good one. Gov. Mike Pence of Indiana is the real goods.

School choice means innovation

Israel Teitelbaum (and many others) miss the boat when they focus on liberty and "freedom to choose" as the key justification for charter schools, vouchers and the Education Freedom Accounts Act ("'A Republic — if you can keep it,'" Web, July 12).

Trump's no dunce

Wesley Pruden's comment that there is "ample evidence that the Donald is an uneducated lout" reminds me of Clark Clifford's remark that President Ronald Reagan was an "amiable dunce" ("The election to terrify us all," Web, July 11).

Cleveland Browns running back Isaiah Crowell apologized for posting a graphic on Instagram that depicts the brutal killing of a police officer. (Associated Press)

Isaiah Crowell, Minnesota Lynx actions show sports, society continue to collide

Sports take place in such public arenas (literally), it's unrealistic to think everyone will get along and play nice without the threat of uniformed, armed police officers on hand. It's also unrealistic to expect lockstep-thinking and behavior from the athletes. They have a platform and some will use it to express their opinions, no matter how they might conflict with your or anyone else's thoughts.

Vilifying officers endangers lives

Police actions in Ferguson, Mo., New York, Baltimore, Baton Rouge, La., and Minnesota have been in the news, and a few police officers have been seen using excessive force and shooting people. I believe a small number of police officers use excessive force, and these officers should be held accountable for their actions. However, the vast majority of police officers diligently do their duty and treat criminals and suspects fairly.

Illustration on the court's reaffirmation of Fourth Amendment rights by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A slapdown of civil asset forfeiture

David, meet Goliath. Incredibly enough, a small-town Maryland dairy farmer and his wife just won their legal claim against the Internal Revenue Service and Department of Justice and will now be able to recoup tens of thousands of dollars seized in what turned out to be an unconstitutional application of civil asset forfeiture.

Ginsburg's constitution contempt

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg's disdain for the political process parallels her contempt for the U.S. Constitution ("Donald Trump on Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg: 'Her mind is shot -- resign,'" Web, July 13).

Maggie Kiser, 2, waves a flag as she is pulled along by her grandfather, Gary White, during the Amarillo Street Neighborhood Parade in Abilene, Texas, Monday, July 4, 2016. (Tommy Metthe/The Abilene Reporter-News via AP)

Redefining patriotism

Patriots proliferate on the Fourth of July, with the red, white and blue all around. But after the fireworks fade from the night sky the Stars and Stripes are often relegated to the back of the hall closet. In 2016, so the pollsters find, many are not so proud to be Americans.

The lady who talks too much

Ruth Bader Ginsburg has always had difficulty getting over herself. She has opinions on many things, and when she's not speaking ex-cathedra, as it were, she's eager to express those opinions elsewhere, as if the public were waiting breathlessly for them. Lately she has even been forgetting her place.

Illustration on the future of robot policing by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Robots join the thin blue line

The surreal fact in the human tragedy in Dallas is that the evil sniper who slew five police officers was not finally killed by a fellow officer, but by a mechanical robot. This conjures science fiction images of killer robots deployed against man. It's not altogether reassuring.

Illustration on Mexican meth and violent crime in Texas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tracing Mexican meth to the Dallas cop killer

In all likelihood, Dallas police killer Micah Johnson was an amphetamine addict. On July 9, quoting Dallas police sources, Fox reported that meth had been found in a search of the home he shared with his mother.

Illustration on Ambassador Scott Gration's use of a non-government server by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton beats the rap while condemning others to face it

- The Washington Times

As he methodically laid out the case against Hillary Clinton for her use of a private, unsecure server and email accounts to carry out all of her official government business as secretary of state before declining to recommend criminal charges, FBI Director James Comey left out one major piece of evidence.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton Speaks at the Old State House in Springfield, Ill., Wednesday, July 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hillary Clinton and personal honesty

When FBI Director James Comey publicly revealed his recommendation to the Department of Justice last week that former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton not be prosecuted for espionage, he unleashed a firestorm of criticism from those who believe that Mrs. Clinton was judged by different standards from those used to judge others when deciding whether to bring a case to a grand jury.

FBI Director James Comey pauses while testifying on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, July 7, 2016, before the House Oversight Committee to explain his agency's recommendation to not prosecute Hillary Clinton, now the Democratic presidential candidate, over her private email setup during her time as secretary of state.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Should Hillary thank the stupid party?

Republicans belong to the stupid party, it's been said, and some have lately been trying to justify the slur. They have been hell-bent on destroying the credibility of the man who just gave them one of the biggest election-year gifts imaginable.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Fall of Man in Wilmslow'

"Fall of Man in Wilmslow" is about the English mathematician Alan Turing, whose decryption of the German Enigma code is credited with shortening World War II and helping found computing as the science we know today. Mr. Turing's role in this endeavor was long shrouded in official secrecy, made all the more byzantine after he was convicted of homosexuality in 1952, when it was still a crime in Britain.