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Illustration on Taiwan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

China, Taiwan and an important anniversary

This year Beijing will stand in solidarity with Taiwan and commemorate the 70th anniversary of the “228 Massacre.” On Feb. 28, 1947 Generalissimo Chiang Kai-shek’s Kuomintang (KMT) security forces stopped Lin Jiang-mai, a Taiwanese widow, for illegal cigarette sales. The KMT officers confiscated Mrs. Lin’s cash and wares. They struck her on the head repeatedly for resisting.

Healthcare Industry Dependence on Obamacare Finances Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When hospitals resist change

Most Republican health care proposals include Health Savings Accounts (HSAs). People like them because they reward healthy lifestyle choices and careful, cost-conscious use of health care resources. When we are advised we need to get a MRI, we ask “when?” and “where?” but hardly ever, “what does it cost?”

Chart to acompany Moore article of Feb. 27, 2017

Pleading poverty, demanding new taxes

Stop me if you’ve heard this story before. Governors and state legislators are pleading poverty again and they are demanding tax hikes of every imaginable kind. More than half the states are facing big deficits this year and they are mostly blue states like California, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois and New York and Oregon. (See chart.) These are the highest tax states with some of the deepest pools of red ink. There’s got to be a message here.

Illustration on trump's international policy attitude by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The Trump Doctrine

The United States needs a grand strategy to guide its foreign policy. The Trump Doctrine should announce boldly that America is back in the world leadership business and that it stands resolutely for peace. America should call out countries that threaten world peace and form military alliances with their neighbors to confront them.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting on domestic and international human trafficking, Thursday, Feb. 23, 2017, in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington. With Trump are Michelle DeLaune, center, National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, and Dina Powell, right, White House Senior Counselor for Economic Initiatives. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trumpspeak, a language rich in adjectives

- The Washington Times

Donald Trump isn’t the carrier of the disease that threatens the language, but he suffers with enthusiasm. His abuse of the adjective might eventually threaten his foreign policy.

Illustration on immigration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘I am an immigrant’

I have a Masters in International Relations, speak four languages and served as a politician in my country, the Republic of Georgia. I am also an immigrant.

Playing the xenophobic card

- The Washington Times

Last week, The New York Times detailed President Donald Trump’s press conference, and wrote: “A Jewish reporter got to ask Trump a question, it didn’t go well.”

The Genesis of Despicable Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Being a ‘deplorable’

Who among us can’t at some point relate to what it feels like to be an “irredeemable deplorable,” a term coined in the heat of a campaign but with far greater implications now. Whether we are religious or not, whether we pray or not, whether we are political activists or not, many of us know what it feels like to be mocked to the point of less than “other” status.

Illustration of Ajit Pai by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A new champion for internet choice

One of President Trump’s less publicized appointments also happens to be one of his best: Ajit Pai as the new chairman of the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) is a cause for celebration.

Illustration on the 9th Circuit court by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Reining in a hysterical judiciary

On Feb. 9, a three-judge panel of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit issued a ruling upholding the temporary restraining order against enforcement of President Trump’s Executive Order 13769.

Illustration on the complexities of dealing with illegal immigration by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The labyrinth of illegal immigration

Activists portray illegal immigration solely as a human story of the desperately poor from south of the border fleeing misery to start new, productive lives in the United States — despite exploitation and America’s nativist immigration laws.

Black Leadership Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Enlightened, inspired black leadership

After having been assigned to the United States Military Academy at West Point, one becomes acutely aware of the critical role leadership plays in solving challenging social problems. As an African-American, with that experience, I cannot not but consider the role black leadership plays in addressing African-American issues.

Illustration on domestic spying by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

The spooks have come home to roost

Last week, The Wall Street Journal revealed that members of the intelligence community — part of the deep state, the unseen government within the government that does not change with elections — now have acquired so much data on everyone in America that they can selectively reveal it to reward their friends and harm their foes. Their principal foe today is the president of the United States.

Related Articles

President Donald Trump during a campaign rally Saturday, Feb. 18, 2017, in Melbourne, Fla. (AP Photo/Chris O'Meara)

The premature obituary

Sometimes blood in the water is just the residue from a bowl of strawberries. When Andrew Puzder withdrew his name from consideration as secretary of Labor last week, following the cashiering of Mike Flynn as the president's national security adviser, President Trump's critics were satisfied at last that the end was near, the Trump administration is collapsing and that there must be a miracle around the corner to deliver them from their broken dreams and gossamer wishes. The water had turned pink.

A large crowd gathers for the rally outside the Lackawanna County Courthouse in Scranton Pa., Sunday Feb. 19, 2017, to focus on protecting the Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid. (Jason Farmer/The Times & Tribune via AP)

The rose by another name

The courts continue to wrestle with homosexual nuptials and the meaning of "participation." The Washington state Supreme Court last week held that a florist in Richland, Wash., had no right in the law to refuse to provide flowers to two men for their same-sex wedding because to participate in such a rite would violate her deeply held religious beliefs.

Revealing the spirit of Ike

Bret Baier's new book, "Three Days in January: Dwight Eisenhower's Final Mission," highlights Ike's passing of the torch as commander in chief to Jack Kennedy as the key to opening the door to a better, more accurate understanding of Ike. Change of command in military units, large and small, is always arresting, and from president to president is unique, as we just saw again on Jan. 20, 2017.

Increasing Cyber Vandalism Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The cyberhacking to come

If you thought the 2016 presidential election was an orgy of cyber hacking of Hillary Clinton's private email server, of the Democratic Party computers being trawled through, and of fake news stories about Donald Trump's hijinks in Russia, you are right. But you ain't seen nothing yet.

Illustration on the history of Presidents Day by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Capitol Hill's assault on holidays

Today, Feb. 20, is a federal holiday. The government in Washington dubs it "Washington's Birthday," but if you look at your calendar, chances are good that it's called "Presidents' Day" or "Presidents Day" — a term that became popular among states in recent years, along with "Washington's and Lincoln's Birthday" in a few states.

Illustration on plans to defeat radical Islam by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating radical Islam

Who is the enemy? It's been over 15 years since Sept. 11, 2001, and this fundamental question still rattles around. Prominent answers have included evildoers, violent extremists, terrorists, Muslims, and Islamists.

Illustration on choice in health care by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

How the market can fix health care

Republicans agree that Obamacare has failed and must be repealed. But they can't agree on the replacement "plan."

Congressman Matt Cartwright speaks during a rally held at the Lackawanna County Courthouse in Scranton Pa., Sunday Feb. 19, 2017, to focus on protecting Affordable Care Act, Medicare and Medicaid. (Jason Farmer/The Times & Tribune via AP)

Congress must stop death by decree

At the first meeting of the Trump Leadership Council -- an advisory group consisting of top CEOs from major companies -- President Donald Trump asked these business leaders what was their biggest problem. I expected the answer to be America's anti-growth tax system.

Focus on jobs, not feelings

During his campaign, President Trump talked a lot about infrastructure. He was going to build new schools, new roads, new bridges, etc. He was going to put 100,000 people to work, and that was just for starters. So far, all I've heard for three weeks is 'Everyone is picking on me.' Mr. Trump doesn't like what this person said; he doesn't like what that person said. He is constantly sending out angry tweets.

Media did due diligence on nominees

Now that Michael Flynn has been forced out as national security adviser, Andrew Puzder has had to withdraw his name from nomination for labor secretary and Betsy DeVos was so unpopular as to have needed the vice president to break a tie vote on her confirmation as education secretary, one wonders whether the Trump administration will learn anything from these debacles.

About 50 fast food workers protest the nomination of former Hardees CEO Andrew Puzder to lead the U.S. Department of Labor on Thursday, Jan. 12, 2017, outside the current headquarters of the fast food chain in downtown St. Louis. Fast food workers claim Puzder is unfit for the position because of his policies toward employees as Hardees boss. (Christian Gooden/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)

Trump's missing free market warriors

Andy Puzder's withdrawal for consideration as Donald Trump's secretary of Labor might have been premature but for the easy surrender of the Republicans in the Senate to a left-wing slander campaign. Mr. Puzder's replacement, R. Alexander Acosta, is a labor lawyer without any real-life experience in hiring workers, but he looks confirmable. However, this leaves the new administration with almost no sound voices for free-market ideas.

California Claim Jumpers Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why California's mining ban is against the law

If you ask a rural Westerner how he feels about federal lands, the response will likely contain plenty of four-letter words. For decades, decisions made by faraway bureaucrats to restrict the productive uses of these lands have significantly affected nearby property owners and local economies, creating a constant source of conflict.

President Donald Trump (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The Russia conundrum

Donald Trump's presidency is in deep trouble. After nearly four weeks in office, he has yet to finish filling his administration's top posts, and Congress is about to conduct an investigation into his ties to Russia.

Murder, a memory problem and justice

Commander William Monk has been haunted for many years by loss of memory suffered in an accident and that disaster has turned into a nightmare in which he finds himself facing charges of murder and a possible death sentence.

Illustration on economic and technological ties between America and Israel by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The U.S.-Israel economic bond

Much of the talk around President Trump's meeting this week with Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu at the White House surrounds the political and security relationship between the two countries. That is important. But it is only part of the story. Despite having a tiny population of eight million people, Israel is playing a crucial role in helping to power the U.S. economy for the next generation.

Evan McMullin

#NeverTrumpers fight back, with the help of the deep state

The #NeverTrumpers are at it again, cheering on the "deep state" in the bureaucracy and politicized members in the intelligence community as they try to undermine and delegitimize President Trump. Their actions are disturbing, destructive and — as the president himself correctly tweeted — deeply "un-American."

President Donald Trump during a news conference in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, Feb. 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump is the answer to all that ails Washington

- The Washington Times

In a whirling dervish White House press conference, President Trump manhandled the press, piledrived all the fake news and reminded the world why he tore through both political parties and got elected president in the first place.