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FILE - In this April 18, 2015 file photo, Carly Fiorina speaks at the Republican Leadership Summit in Nashua, N.H.  The former technology executive formally entered the 2016 presidential race on Monday.  (AP Photo/Jim Cole)

An unusual field crowds the Republican pool

- The Washington Times

It’s spring, and the water must be fine, because everybody’s jumping in. Carly Fiorina leaped in Monday with Ben Carson, and Mike Huckabee will follow Tuesday. Republicans have never had such diversity.

Hope denied in Baltimore

When young men riot, as they did in Baltimore last week, it is the police on whom we depend to restore order. But how do we expect this to be done? What were these police actually to do?

FILE - This May 1, 1944 file photo shows Stars and Stripes artist Sgt. Bill Mauldin sketching Pvt. Robert L. Bowman, left, of Hogansville, Ga., on the Anzio beachhead in Italy during World War II. Two dozen original editorial cartoons created by Mauldin, a Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonist and World War II veteran are set to hit the auction block as part of a major comic art auction in Beverly Hills, Calif. A native of New Mexico, Bill Mauldin became known during World War II for his Willie and Joe characters. He lifted the spirits of U.S. soldiers through the cartoons, which used edgy humor to depict the horrors of war. (AP Photo/File)

Dissing the vets

Maybe we don’t need a return to the draft but we surely need to demand some form of national service.

"It's time we end the era of mass incarceration," Hillary Rodham Clinton said in a speech at Columbia University in New York, which was the first major address of her White House run. (Associated Press)

The real Hillary Clinton problem

The qualities Americans associate with effective political leadership in general and with female leaders in particular do not match up with the popular perception of Hillary Clinton.

How to run a great city into the ground

All around us failed Democratic leadership is insisting on being recognized. As Baltimore, a great American city, teeters on a precipice, media and politicians still tiptoe around the truth, knowing if reality was actually acknowledged, the entire liberal narrative would collapse.

Illustration on remembrance of the Vietnam War by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Remembering the fall of Vietnam

Probably no event in contemporary American history touched more of its citizens than “Vietnam.” I use the quotes to describe a concept that includes more than the country, the American war and 58,000 lost American lives, and convoluted arguments still haunting our political discourse.

Elizabeth and Hillary 1 percent illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton bows to the far left

The next election is 20 months away but Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton is already sharpening her class-warfare guillotine in order to rev up her party’s far-left voting base.

Chart to accompany Moore article May 4, 2015

Our economic ‘slow-rolling crisis’

Are the alarm bells finally clanging at the White House and in Congress? They should be. This week’s pitiful economic growth scorecard of 0.2 percent economic growth for the first quarter of this year means the Obama slow-growth machine grinds onward. It’s the slowest recovery in a half-century. The “Summer of Recovery” Joe Biden promised back in 2009 still hasn’t arrived — six years later.

Joani Allen, an opponent of same-sex marriage, holds a sign during a rally at the Utah State Capitol Tuesday, April 28, 2015, in Salt Lake City. Supporters and opponents of same-sex marriage rallied in Utah on Tuesday after the U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on the constitutionality of laws banning such marriages. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

More love and marriage ahead, American style

- The Washington Times

American ingenuity is the envy of the world, and why not? The exceptional nation may no longer be the workshop of the world — Americans drive cars built in Japan, wear pants made in Malaysia, shirts sewn in Burma, shoes cobbled in Canada and drawers, from petite to queen size, manufactured in China — but nobody makes excuses, takes offense quicker and nurtures hurt feelings longer than the Americans. Taking offense is the great American growth industry.

Illustration on Bill Clinton's monetary abuse of his status as former president by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Destroying the spirit of Cincinnatus

Looking back on the 500-year history of the Roman Republic, it can be seen that one sign of its decline was when its great leaders no longer toiled for their country but rather for themselves.

Moral compass illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The lying game

Will the next presidential election be won by a lie?

Illustration on GOP alternatives to Obamacare by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A strategy for Obamacare after the Supreme Court rules

When the Supreme Court rules in the King v. Burwell case this summer, it will strike down Obamacare benefits in 36 states. That is because the Obama administration did not follow its own Obamacare law as passed by congressional Democrats and signed by President Obama.

Illustration on the damaging intrusions of the CFPB by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Government help that hurts instead

Last week the House of Representatives passed H.R. 1195, a bill that would create a small business advisory board to oversee the actions of the Consumer Financial Protections Bureau. While the bill is a small step in the right direction, President Obama has announced he is warming up his veto pen should the legislation reach his desk.

Related Articles

Unshackle energy, Internet

Stephen Moore's excellent op-ed "State of the planet: It's better than ever" (Web, April 26) overlooks Internet communications' wonderful contributions to energy-supply increase and a cleaner environment.

Lessons from a happy place

What is the happiest place? Last week in its annual "World Happiness Report," the United Nations reported that Switzerland was No. 1. The United States ranked No. 15, and the African country of Togo came in last, at number 158.

Illustration on the actual nature of marriage laws by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The wrong argument against traditional marriage

The Supreme Court will hear oral arguments in a set of cases, including Obergefell v. Hodges on Tuesday, challenging state laws and constitutions that define marriage as the union of a man and a woman. One of the arguments made by those who wish to redefine marriage nationwide is that classifying same-sex couples differently from opposite-sex couples for purposes of civil marriage violates the Equal Protection Clause of the 14th Amendment.

Liberals and magical thinking

We all know that children think magically, and naturally inhabit a world of fantasy and imagination. It's the perfect place to be when you're a kid. The problem is, adults on the left seem to have decided they deserve to live in that same magical world, where facts and logic and reason just don't exist.

Illustration on the actual state of planet Earth contradicting environmental alarmists by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

State of the planet: It's better than ever

There is no time in the history of mankind that would be a better time to be alive than today. Nearly every objective measure of the state of the planet and the state of human progress shows vast improvement over time. You can find proof of this in about 30 seconds on your iPhone, a computing powerhouse that places the world at your fingertips.

Jan Palmer, a biology teacher at Central High School in Aberdeen, S.D., top right, leads her Advanced Placement/Rising Scholars biology class through a practice test. (AP Photo/Aberdeen American News, Kevin Bennett, File)

The 'fix' is in for AP courses

When controversy erupted a year ago about the lack of balance in the College Board's new AP U.S. History (APUSH) Framework, the College Board initially dug in its heels and stubbornly defended the new course. But the tone has changed.

Greece's Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras makes his way to welcome visiting Cypriot President Nicos Anastasiadis in Athens, on Friday, April 17, 2015. Anastasiadis is on a one-day official visit to Greece.   (AP Photo/Yorgos Karahalis)

Europe's long-running struggle over Greece's debt

After three days of Washington meetings recently, world financial officials of the International Monetary Fund dealt with Greece's massive debt problem with stern warnings about the necessity for the nation to overhaul its near-crashed economy.

Illustration on innovative campaigning for the GOP in 2016 by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Campaigning on the future, not the past

When the 45th president of the United States of America is sworn into office on Jan. 20, 2017, it will be a moment to rejoice and reflect upon how one person reached the highest office in the land. To get there, the newly elected president would have been forced to make difficult decisions, which led to winning his (or her) party's nomination for president.

President Barack Obama laughs at a joke during the White House Correspondents' Association dinner at the Washington Hilton on Saturday, April 25, 2015, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The liberation of President Obama

President Obama obviously feels liberated by the sight of his administration swiftly approaching the outer suburbs of oblivion. With no fear of red line or deadline, he has set about to use the time he has left in office to make the United States a nation that neither he nor Michelle would be ashamed to be proud of.

FILE - In this Tuesday, April 21, 2015 file photo, Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Rodham Clinton speaks to students and faculty during a campaign stop at New Hampshire Technical Institute in Concord, N.H. The acting chief executive of the Clinton Foundation is acknowledging the global philanthropy made mistakes in how it disclosed its donors amid growing scrutiny as Hillary Rodham Clinton opens her presidential campaign, Sunday, April 26, 2015. (AP Photo/Jim Cole, File)

A ’bot with a rap sheet

Sometimes the news sounds like science fiction by Ray Bradbury. We've been asked by a high government official, lately in charge of the State Department, to believe that certain of her emails reside in a black hole in cyberspace. Two scientists — computer geeks, anyway — are working on a computer program to bring a dead man back as a virtual live man for a virtual conversation.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's achievements by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary's foreign policy 'achievements'

Hillary Clinton announced her candidacy for president and the Earth did not move. This wasn't exactly a surprise since the bench in the Democratic Party isn't deep. Her brief for doing so is based on the claim she is a woman who cares about the middle class. Of course, this is an odd construction since she had little experience as a member of this class.

Geller's bus ads spread hate

Pamela Geller, an outspoken critic of Islam, has claimed a giant victory in exercising her First Amendment right to free speech ("Anti-jihad, anti-sharia ads protected by First Amendment, federal judge rules," Web, April 21).

Family comes first

In "Suicide of a Superpower," the author Patrick Buchanan writes: "When the faith dies, the culture dies, the civilization dies, the people die. This is the progression."

What makes America exceptional

"Seminal" is not a word that fits many books, but it fits this one, for "American Beliefs" is both creative and original. It rests on a simple conclusion: This nation became one different from all others because of the nature of its earliest arrivals from Europe.