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Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton takes the stage for the third presidential debate at University of Nevada in Las Vegas, Wednesday, Oct. 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hillary as ladies’ fashion leader. Who knew?

- The Washington Times

Nobody has accused Hillary Clinton of setting an example of how to dress for success, and certainly not for fun. She’s clearly no Melania Trump. But she may be assisting the Chinese in bringing back “the Mao suit.” She probably shouldn’t expect a standing ovation from men.

Illustration on Special Ops forces by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Where warrior-spies fight in the shadows

As the Obama administration has retreated, or openly flirted with retrenchment, from Middle Eastern wars during its tenure, America has been spared the full onslaught of jihadi terrorism because of the exertions of nation’s special military forces and the intelligence communities working in concert.

Illustration on the Banana Republic level of Obama/Clinton politics by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Obama-Clinton banana republic

- The Washington Times

A fair, balanced, and independent Justice Department. Neutral diplomats, who serve the public over politics, at the State Department. An unbiased, honest, mainstream media.

Importance of the Black Vote Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why blacks should abandon the Democratic Party

Unnoticed by the mainstream media, which prefers showier displays of political protest, there is a quiet revolution going on in the African-American community. Confronted by a problematic candidate and a platform that has abandoned them, more and more black voters are questioning whether they should support the Democratic Party.

Illustration on Trump's negative impact on the GOP by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

It didn’t have to be this way

The presidential debates are mercifully over in an election that may long be remembered as a lost opportunity for Republicans to take control of the nation’s government for the next four to eight years.

An unnamed, newborn eastern black rhino walks around with it's mother, Ayana, Monday Oct. 17, 2016, at the Blank Park Zoo in Des Moines, Iowa. The endangered eastern black rhino mother gave birth to the female, 80-pound calf on Oct. 11, and is likely the first endangered rhino born in the state of Iowa, according zoo officials. “This is an extremely significant event — not only in Blank Park Zoo’s 50 year history, but also for this critically endangered animal species,” zoo CEO Mark Vukovich said. (Rodney White/The Des Moines Register via AP)

Recovering the Endangered Species Act

The late Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia once described the Endangered Species Act as imposing “unfairness to the point of financial ruin — not just upon the rich, but upon the simplest farmer who finds his land conscripted to national zoological use.” His comment resonates with far too many landowners across the country.

Dehumanizing Assisted Suicide Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hurting the seriously ill rather than helping

The D.C. Council voted this week to add a physician-assisted suicide bill to their legislative agenda. Proponents insist that such suicides be viewed as a purely private matter between an autonomous adult who desires to die and another autonomous adult who can provide medical assistance in death.

A worker steps through the maze of hoses being used at a remote fracking site in Rulison, Colorado. (Associated Press/File)

The geopolitics of fracking

Events in the United States occurring during the past two weeks promise to shake up global energy markets and undermine Russian power, unless President Obama or Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton further attempt to prop up Russian President Vladimir Putin’s energy cabal.

Illustration on the IRS under Hillary Clinton's presidency by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton’s IRS — a sneak preview

Imagine: What if the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) singled out hundreds of grassroots citizens groups across the nation and subjected them to ill treatment because of their political beliefs and values, mainly in opposition to the president of the United States?

History of Media Bias in America Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

America’s tradition of media bias

Americans regularly decry media bias — especially during elections. The truth, however, is that for the vast majority of American history, we have had biased media. The problem today is that it is so drastically one-sided that it is tipping election results.

Retooling Schools Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redefining American education to rekindle growth

Americans face daunting challenges beyond the apparent grasp of the principal contenders for president. Rekindling growth and creating enough good-paying jobs will require wholly rethinking how we educate and socialize young people for work.

Georgia Governor Nathan Deal officially announces the end of his mandatory evacuation from Chatham County Sunday, Oct. 9, 2016, during a press conference at Signature Aviation. Residents were allowed back to their home till the beginning of curfew at 10PM Sunday. (Josh Galemore/Savannah Morning News via AP)

Georgia’s story of redemption

When I took office in January 2011, Georgia was in the midst of a criminal justice system crisis. The state’s prison population and incarceration budget had doubled in the previous two decades and taxpayers were spending $1 billion per year to keep tens of thousands of inmates behind bars.

U.S. in the ISIS Crosshairs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary’s Achilles’ heel

Nov. 8 may very well go down in history as the day Americans signed our nation’s death certificate. We the people need to understand what is at stake in the most important election in U.S. history

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton boards her campaign plane at Westchester County Airport in White Plains, N.Y., Tuesday, Oct. 18, 2016, to travel to Las Vegas for the third presidential debate. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

This time of crisis: Dems say everything is fine, but they are wrong

On a rare occasion, we Fox News contributors will visit programming off-campus. I did just that last Sunday as a guest on CBS News’ “Face the Nation.” Any time Donald Trump’s candidacy is going to be discussed, you now have to presume it will be less about the issues, and more about the shiny distraction of “accusers” from Mr. Trump’s past.

Related Articles

Politically Correct American Military Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How politicizing the military puts national security at risk

There have been many articles written about "political correctness" and how it has effectively silenced any dissent from our military leaders. In a recent article in Foreign Affairs by Michael E. O'Hanlon and David H. Petraeus, titled "America's Awesome Military," the authors continue to promote political correctness and the Obama administration's propaganda that "the United States has the best military in the world today, and have few, if any weaknesses."

Clinton a career criminal

Recently released emails show that the Justice Department was in contact with the Hillary Clinton campaign, warning it about various aspects of the criminal investigation into Clinton. This means that the fix (as anyone whose been paying attention already knows) was in. The Democratic nominee for president is a criminal who is not in prison because Obama's Justice Department is totally corrupt.

Campaign buttons in support of Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump rest on a vendor table before a campaign rally at US Bank Arena, Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016, in Cincinnati. (AP Photo/John Minchillo)

The partisans in the tall weeds

There's nothing quite as sad as watching grown men racing for the tall grass in the face of difficulty and danger. The Republican elites panicked by the disclosure that Donald Trump said something gross -- even if not necessarily as gross as some of the things attributed to JFK and LBJ and Bill Clinton -- should remember what Donald Rumsfeld, who was then the secretary of Defense, said during the first Gulf War.

A member of the audience holds up a mask depicting Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton as she speaks at a rally at the Colorado State Fairgrounds in Pueblo, Colo., Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, to attend a rally. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Hypocrisy and Hillary

If Hillary Clinton and hypocrisy are not exactly synonymous, they share the same web address. The WikiLeaks cache of emails containing excerpts of her paid speeches to private donors and organizations demonstrate that every time she opens her mouth, out comes cant.

Capitol Castle Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Medieval America

Pessimists often compare today's troubled America to a tottering late Rome or an insolvent and descending British Empire. But medieval Europe (roughly 500 to 1450 A.D.) is the more apt comparison.

Illustration on the deplorable content of the 2016 presidential campaign by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The presidential candidates we deserve

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton are only an accurate reflection of our culture of vulgarity and hypocrisy. Both of them. They're the candidates we asked for. The country may not deserve them, but we the people do.

Illustration on Hillary's redistributionist intentions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

What this campaign is really all about

- The Washington Times

The political firestorms of the past week -- the 2005 tape of Donald Trump uttering crass statements about women, WikiLeaks' disclosure of thousands of Hillary Clinton's emails revealing her two-faced hypocrisy, the appearance at the second presidential debate of several women who have accused Bill Clinton of rape and sexual assault, Mr. Trump's comeback debate performance -- have obscured one critically important truth.

President Barack Obama gestures as he speaks during a reception for Hispanic Heritage Month in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016, in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Secrets from the closets of skeletons

Hacking files of other people is not nice, and if the FBI finds out who's doing it the perps should be punished, even if they're Russians, and severely. But we're nevertheless learning some interesting things in the WikiLeaks disclosures. This sudden mania for disclosure of bad language and naughty behavior encourages others to contribute entertaining and embarrassing videos.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Ten Restaurants that Changed America'

In these days of ever-increasing specialization in the academic world, with its micro-courses and all too narrow focus, it is a delightful surprise to encounter someone like Yale's professor Paul Freedman.

Hillary Clinton's promise to use Supreme Court nominations to push a left-wing agenda did more than anything Donald Trump said during the debate to win back his supporters, conservative leaders said Wednesday. (Associated Press)

Hillary's forgotten foreign aid fiascos

Hillary Clinton is the most qualified presidential candidate in history, according to President Obama. Much of her managerial experience stems from her four years as secretary of State.

The Bickering Bickersons Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Bickersons revisited

Not since George and Martha in the play "Whose Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" or for older readers Don Ameche and Frances Langford in the radio comedy "The Bickersons," have we seen the kind of verbal pugilism practiced in Sunday night's presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

Illustration on Hurricane Matthew by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

Taking advantage of Hurricane Matthew

In the wake of Hurricane Matthew, Hillary Clinton has called on Al Gore to help boost her candidacy among voters concerned about climate change. If Tuesday's Clinton-Gore climate change rally in Miami is any indication, we are in for a wild ride in the coming weeks. Their speeches were riddled with science misrepresentations and outright mistakes.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks at a rally at the Colorado State Fairgrounds in Pueblo, Colo., Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Can the media reveal stolen truths?

It seems that at every turn during this crazy presidential election campaign -- with its deeply flawed principal candidates (whom do you hate less?) -- someone's personal or professional computer records are being hacked. First it was Hillary Clinton's emails that she had failed to surrender to the State Department.

Shock Therapy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The FDA's bow to barbarism

Most would find incredible the notion that forcing up to 450 volts of electricity into a person's brain to induce a grand mal seizure would not pose a high risk of catastrophic brain injury, yet the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) presumes, without the benefit of scientific proof, that the long-term effects of Electroconvulsive Therapy (ECT) pose no high risk for psychiatric patients.

Trump bets on Russian vote

Donald Trump's pro-Putin perspective on Syria puts him at odds with his own running mate and most every other politician observing Russian tactics ("After testy VP debate, Trump rebuffs claim he 'loves' Putin," Web, Oct. 5). Does the Donald know something the rest of the Western world doesn't?

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, accompanied by former Vice President Al Gore, right, attempts to quiet the crowd as a protester disrupts her speech during a rally at Miami Dade College in Miami, Tuesday, Oct. 11, 2016. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Top 10 Clinton scandals exposed by WikiLeaks

- The Washington Times

The ongoing WikiLeaks dump of Hillary Clinton's campaign chairman John Podesta's emails has exposed the corruption and cronyism of her campaign and time in office. Everyday there are more revelations of wrongdoing, so much so, it's hard to keep up with. So here's the top 10 double-dealing, dishonest discoveries uncovered thus far.

Illustration on the fruits of Bill and Hillary Clinton's sexual misadventures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sex lives matter

History is full of surprises. Never have I, looking back on history, found it to go precisely as I had anticipated it would go. Always the reality of history's progress plays tricks on us. It now appears that the sexual revolution begun in the late 1960s is ending, and would it not be spectacular if one or two of its most famous products were done in by this historic turn of events?