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Illustration on the current mixed feelings over our national heritage by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Beautiful for a patriot’s dream

Approaching the first Fourth of July in the time of Trump, a holiday Americans also call “Independence Day,” it’s hard to find much independent thinking. Polarized rages and rants follow red and blue patterns of division, deepening the fragmentation of national unity and making patriotic pride suspect. Verbal fireworks are today’s “bombs bursting in air.”

Illustration on the latest Supreme Court decisions by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Two wins for Trump

The Supreme Court’s decision to allow portions of President Trump’s travel ban to proceed is a much-needed victory for the administration. The high court ruled that those “who lack any bona fide relationship with a person or entity in the United States” could be denied entry into the U.S. The ban targets those from six majority-Muslim countries, halting entry until “extreme vetting” can be conducted.

Persecution of Christians Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Evangelicals, the last holdouts on gay marriage line

- The Washington Times

Resistance and opposition to same-sex marriage has been crumbling among Americans — save for one specific segment of society that’s proving the last wall to even wider acceptance: Evangelicals. Standing strong on the side of scripture on this point is going to prove lonely, not to mention intense.

Illustration on the unwise course of Democrats in their attacks on President Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The progressive boomerang

The progressive strategy of investigating President Trump nonstop for Russian collusion or obstruction of justice or witness tampering so far has produced no substantial evidence of wrongdoing.

North Korea Dilemma Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

North Korea’s wake-up call

The horrific death of Otto Warmbier should be a wake-up call to the United States and China that we are failing terribly with North Korea. Kim Jong-un appears indifferent to the death of this young American held hostage in Pyongyang and with the continued detention of three Americans.

Climate-friendly Midwest Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A state-based response to climate change

Rapid environmental change is a significant global challenge with wide-reaching impacts to national security, business continuity and global health. Even as the White House withdraws the United States from the Paris Accords, the effects of climate change are already being felt today in our local communities.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., confers with Sen. Mazie Hirono, D-Hawaii, left, before the start of a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, June 20, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Have you heard? Warren has another regulatory overreach idea

Consider, as an important case study, Sen. Elizabeth Warren’s drive to regulate personal hearing aids, known as PSAPs (personal sound amplification products). Her legislative vehicle is the Federal Drug Administration reauthorization bill, which needs to pass in the next couple months. The bill would impose new FDA regulations on existing PSAPs, preempting state laws and regulations that have been on the books for decades.

Illustration on dealing with the rise of violent Shariaists in the U.S. after the demise of the ISIS caliphate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Fending off ISIS and Shariah

Do I detect a note of desperation in how some of my fellow Americans discuss how to treat terrorism, specifically the Islamic State, or ISIS? ISIS has grown from a small group of brutes back in President Obama’s time committing various heinous crimes into a small army consisting of a few thousand, perhaps tens of thousands committing heinous crimes.

Illustration on the thought of Michael Lind by Linus Garsys/The Washington Times

A new role for America

If you’re puzzled by the swirl of geopolitical forces besetting the globe, and the debates unleashed by that swirl as to the nature of the world we will inherit or should inherit, then you must read Michael Lind’s cover article in the current issue of The National Interest.

Democrats New Hobby Horse Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Democrats’ sudden concern for election integrity

46 minutes ago

When the Democratic Party and its deep-state allies’ favorite anti-Trump columnist begins to sour on the promise of a Russian collusion probe, it is time to start looking for a consolation prize. Based on the overnight interest in all things voting security, they seem to have found a new hobby horse.

Intrusive Government Data Collection Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Supreme Court call on the third party doctrine

This week, constitutional law experts and the law enforcement community were abuzz after the U.S. Supreme Court added Carpenter v. United States to its docket, a case that could reshape government data collection and the Fourth Amendment in the internet Age.

Related Articles

Now they want to read

I find it laughable that the Democratic congressional members are claiming no one has had time to read or study the 1,000-page, Republican-sponsored Obamacare modification. Yet I seem to remember that in 2010, then House Speaker Nancy Pelosi urged Congress to pass President Obama's 2,000-page health-care act so that Congress and all of America could "find out what's in it "

No one-party rule in Taiwan

Numerous social media accounts in Taiwan have been suspended for the 'crime' of criticizing Taiwan's government. The Taiwanese news media tend to self-regulate in order to avoid rejection of license renewal, and they hesitate to report protests or other anti-government-related events.

Illustration on the decline of medical care quality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Supporting medicine and its finest practitioners

Treating emergencies isn't your insurance talking. It's doctoring. It's nursing. It's medical technology. It's your stone-filled gallbladder obstructing and a top surgeon operating on it without delay. You can't prove that a junior attending surgeon wouldn't do just as well, but you can feel it when the wound is healing so well two days later where the angry raw organ was scope-sucked successfully from your body.

Illustration of Anne Morgan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Anne Morgan, an American Hero

The United States was finally in "the war to end all wars." France had been ravaged since the summer of 1914. Villages and towns were obliterated. Women and children went hungry and homeless as the armies wrestled in futile combat in mud, blood and indescribable filth and disease. The British lost 20,000 dead in a single day at the Battle of the Somme.

Illustration on the devaluation of U.S. bonds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Uncle Sam's F-rated bonds

Were the United States any other country, its bonds would have long ago been downgraded to junk.

In this image from video provided by C-SPAN, Wall Street Journal reporter Jay Solomon is interview on the C-SPAN program Washington Journal on Sept. 23, 2014 in Washington. The Wall Street Journal on June 21, 2017, fired Solomon after evidence emerged about his involvement in prospective business deals, including one involving arms sales to foreign governments, with an international businessman who was one of his key sources. Solomon was offered a 10 percent stake in a fledgling company, Denx LLC, by Farhad Azima, an Iranian-born aviation magnate who ferried weapons for the CIA. It was not clear whether Solomon ever received money or formally accepted a stake in the company. Solomon did not immediately comment. (C-SPAN via AP)

Upholding a media standard

Newspaper reporters aren't expected to be purer than Caesar's wife (not even the wife of a Julius Caesar passing as Donald Trump), but a reporter who doesn't measure up to his newspaper's established ethical standards can expect to pay for it.

Sunshine on the wall

Congressional Democrats love to spend money on solar power and infrastructure projects, and President Trump has given them something to think about -- using the sun to power and pay for his border wall.

Terrorists come in all shapes, shades

The recent shooting at a Republican congressional baseball practice in Alexandria attests to the terrifying reality that no one, not even our highest elected officials, is safe from the disturbing nationwide increase in violent acts. Particularly troubling is that the shooter, James Hodgkinson, appears to have made a calculated attempt to inculcate fear with his fierce opposition to President Trump and the GOP.

Photojournalist Shay Horse said he was pepper-sprayed while covering protests at the Jan. 21 presidential inauguration, even though his camera identified him as a journalist. (Sarah Nelson / The Washington Times)

Is ACLU lawsuit against D.C. cops a red herring?

- The Washington Times

"An officer told us to drop our pants," Shay Horse said. "An officer went down the row telling each of us not to flinch as he grabbed our balls and yanked on them, and then stuck his finger up each of our anuses and wiggled it around. I felt like they were using molestation and rape as punishment."

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks to reporters during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Paul Ryan is afraid to lead

- The Washington Times

The thing people like about House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is that he is a serious guy who is capable of thinking big and has an ambitious agenda to salvage our ungovernable federal bureaucracy.

MSNBC's Joe Scarborough discusses the "unmasking" of President Donald Trump's associates by former national security adviser Susan Rice during the 2016 U.S. presidential campaign, April 4, 2017. (MSNBC screenshot)

MSNBC 'Morning Joe' sickeningly paints Hitler picture of Trump

- The Washington Times

Hosts and pundits of "Morning Joe" on MSNBC traveled back in time to Nazi Germany days to make the case President Trump is much more like a dictator or fascist than a free-market, constitutional, duly elected leader. It's sickening. Note to left: Hitler was evil. Quit confusing evil with political differences.

President Donald Trump speaks during a rally, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

The Donald rides again

- The Washington Times

The Donald is back, and he's keeping the Democrats up at night as they try to find a way back into American politics.