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FILE - In this July 9, 2015 file photo, a Wall Street sign is seen near the New York Stock Exchange in New York. U.S. stocks moved lower on the last day of the year as the market headed for a sluggish end to 2015. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig, File)

Who is best to reform Wall Street?

In order to reform the financial industry, the next President needs to understand what the fixes should be or risk an overreaction that makes the excesses worse.

Arrogant Iranian Actions Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Iranian arrogance

Iran’s recent capture of two U.S. Navy 47-foot Riverine Command Boats (RCBs) that were on a routine transit from Kuwait to Bahrain on January 12 is another example of the arrogance and contempt Iran holds for America and our political leadership.

Illustration on deporting persons who have overstayed their visas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A fresh approach to the immigration conundrum

Our broken immigration system has been bad for the country and a source of political division for well over a decade. Some want a so-called “comprehensive” solution to the crisis, but the prospects for it actually happening (let alone being a solution) are not good amid our divisions. It’s time to rise above the existing gridlock and build a national consensus based on national security.

Illustration on the costs of green energy by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Unearthing an all-of-the-above energy approach

Last month in his final State of the Union Address, President Obama abandoned his belief in an “all-of-the-above” approach to energy policy — one that blends the use of emerging and established energy resources for the American people and the American economy.

Crisis in Civic Education Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

College ignorance and the threat to liberty

Media outlets around the country have reported that 10 percent of college graduates think Judith Sheindlin — better known as TV’s “Judge Judy” — is a member of the U.S. Supreme Court. Behind this embarrassing yet hilarious finding is the fact that there is a serious crisis in American higher education.

Illustration on the West's failure to take Muslim culture seriously by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Islamist wears Dolce & Gabbana

In the “culture” section of the venerable Atlantic magazine last month, there was a news item I wouldn’t want you to miss: “The Italian fashion house Dolce & Gabbana has just launched a line of hijabs (headscarves) and abayas (cloaks) in the label’s signature playful, theatrical aesthetic.”

Illustration on the need for a new U.S. military rifle by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama’s search for a ‘safe’ gun

Just after the Battle of Gettysburg, Christopher Spenser, inventor of a revolutionary repeating rifle, escorted Abraham Lincoln out to the East Lawn of the White House to do a bit of target shooting. Lincoln was so impressed that he ordered Gen. James Ripley, the Army’s chief of ordnance, to purchase tens of thousands of Spenser’s repeaters at once and issue them to soldiers.

Illustration on rape and Muslim cultural practices by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Arab rape game

Lobbing firecrackers into the crowd gathered in the square outside Cologne’s cathedral on New Year’s Eve, a thousand-strong violent flash mob of Middle Eastern and North African Muslim men then took their celebration to the next level, breaking into smaller groups and isolating German women to rob, grope, fondle and in two cases (so far), rape them.

President Barack Obama speaks at the Righteous Among the Nations Award Ceremony at the Israeli Embassy in Washington, Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Obama’s Holocaust remembrance

Chutzpah is one of those Yiddish words that defy exact definition. Merriam Webster lists synonyms like “audacity,” “nerve,” “cheek” and “gall.”

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Illustration on Ted Cruz in Iowa by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Predicting Iowa

- The Washington Times

The snowstorm that hit the Washington area last week gave the State Department yet another reason to delay releasing a tranche of embarrassing Hillary Clinton emails, ensnared President Obama's motorcade in the rush-hour disaster that turned half-hour commutes into three-hour nightmares, and revealed how unprepared area governments were to deal with weather they knew full well was on its way.

Illustration contrasting storm gallantry and leftist government dependency by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sometimes it's a blizzard, but never a snow job

NEW YORK CITY -- It's a strange time to be in a blizzard in the birthplace of "New York values." The wind howls through the canyons of commerce like a wolf at full moon, and for a change the noise is from nature and not from the politicians. The blinding whiteout clears the mind to focus on what's at hand, and what requires a helping hand.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Triumph of Faith: Why the World is More Religious than Ever'

In "The Triumph of Faith: Why the World is More Religious than Ever," Rodney Stark challenges the popular notion that the world is becoming increasingly secular. Marshalling ample facts and figures, Mr. Stark, who serves as distinguished professor of the social sciences at Baylor University, dismantles what "everyone knows" in the "confines of the faculty lounge."

Media right on Trump Liberty flap

Charles Hurt's criticisms of the media coverage of Donald Trump's most recent publicized incident completely miss the point ("Donald Trump's Corinthians misquote overblown by media," Web, Jan. 19). Mr. Hurt expounds on the reasons that conservative evangelicals support Mr. Trump, attributing it to the fact that like Mr. Trump, they are politically incorrect people living in a society that directly opposes or demonizes the ideals for which they stand.

The grim news comes with less than a year left for President Obama to put the Affordable Care Act on firmer footing as he seeks to head off what is likely to be a last effort at repealing the act after November's elections. (Associated Press)

Obama's not-so-hot report card

Not everyone can win a popularity contest, which is why not everybody can be the president. As difficult as winning may be, staying in the good graces of the electorate is even more difficult. Seven years after climbing to the top of the heap, public-opinion has put President Obama in his rightful place: well below average. The judgment of his countrymen can be cruel, but it happens to every president.

For Fox News, Donald Trump's absence could be disastrous. The candidate said his presence has helped the previous debates set records for viewership. "Without me, they'd have no ratings," he said in a Twitter post Tuesday as the feud erupted. (Associated Press)

Will he, or won't he, show up?

Conventional wisdom once held that a front-runner shouldn't debate his challengers because meeting them on the same stage gives them stature. So why do a favor for a challenger? That's why Ronald Reagan wouldn't debate George H.W. Bush in 1980. He sat on his lead, lost to Mr. Bush on caucus night and breathed new life into a challenger who began the race as a footnote in most early polls.

Asked by a reporter about Donald Trump, Russian President Vladimir Putin called him a "standout, talented person, without any doubt." "It is not up to us to assess his qualities," Mr. Putin added, "but he is the absolute leader of the presidential race." (Associated Press)

Russia's provocative nuclear strategy

Russian President Putin has said that the collapse of the Soviet Union was the greatest geopolitical catastrophe of the 20th century. He views the West as the culprit and a threat to Moscow's vision of reestablishing Russian dominance over the former lands of the Soviet Union, by force if necessary.

Thew New Liberal Three Stooges Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hollywood's anti-Trump hypocrisy

I'd think it was reverse psychology, except I know they're not that clever. A group of celebrity commissars is organizing against Donald Trump.

Illustration on doing business with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

With Iran it's strictly business

For anyone whose knowledge of history extends beyond the current season of "Keeping Up with the Kardashians" or the latest instant replay of an NFL game, the four days of meetings involving Iran's President Hassan Rouhani, European leaders and businesses should remind people we have seen this show before.

Homecoming: A U.S. government plane met with a Dassault Falcon of the Swiss army air force at Geneva airport in Switzerland to bring back to the U.S. American hostages who were recently freed from lengthy imprisonments in Iran. (Associated Press)

The price of freedom

Freedom is priceless, or used to be. A longstanding American policy decrees that the United States will never negotiate with terrorists, and will never pay ransom for hostages. That rule has been honored in the breach -- never is a long time -- but the rule has never been more enthusiastically abused than during the Obama years.

'Green' agenda hurts West Virginia

The article "West Virginia natural gas production numbers 'shocking'" (Web, Jan. 23) was an interesting read and well-written. These production numbers for oil and natural gas are a glimmer of good news because with the way the Obama administration is determined to eliminate the use of coal in the United States, oil and natural-gas jobs will become even more important to West Virginia's economy.

FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 25, 2015, file photo, more than 30 oil drilling rigs are idle in a Helmerich & Payne, Inc. yard in Odessa, Texas, along Highway 80, as rig counts drop in the Permian Basin. The price of oil continues to fall, extending a slide that has already gone further and lasted longer than most thought, and probing depths not seen since 2003. Lower crude prices are leading to lower prices for gasoline, diesel, jet fuel and heating oil, giving drivers, shippers, and many businesses a big break on fuel costs. But layoffs across the oil industry are mounting, and bankruptcies among oil companies are expected to soar. (Courtney Sacco/Odessa American via AP) MANDATORY CREDIT

A new energy 'crisis'

Big Oil, particularly in the Middle East, never had it so good, and now some of the sheiks sound like they've never had it so bad. A gallon of Perrier, Poland Spring or Mountain Valley Water costs more than a gallon of crude, and Big Oil ain't seen nothin' yet. The shale revolution continues to shake up old assumptions and change things as revolutions always do.

Promising Free Stuff to Get Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Sanders appeal

In schools across the country, student body presidents are elected by making pie-in-the-sky promises. Guarantees of longer lunch breaks, more games at recess, free snacks at the snack bar, and less homework very often lead to a win at the polls, even if the candidate's ability to follow through on such outlandish promises is questionable.

Illustration on threats to Internet freedom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Internet freedom that isn't

When the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) adopted its Open Internet Order in February 2015, it virtually conceded it was not adopting the new regulatory mandates to correct an existing market failure. The commission didn't claim that the Internet was in any sense "closed."

Illustration on worldwide Islamist terror by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Skirmishes on the Indian front

DELHI -- What do you make of this month's attacks on Pathankot Air Force Station and Bacha Khan University? My guess is you don't know -- you've heard next to nothing about either.