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Illustration on the damage being done by Obamacare by Paul Tong/Tribune Content Agency

Obamacare’s Christmas surprise

Get ready for the largely underreported rule that will allow CMS to change Americans’ health plans without their knowledge.

In this Dec. 17, 2014, file photo, a poster for the movie "The Interview" is carried away by a worker after being pulled from a display case at a Carmike Cinemas movie theater in Atlanta. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)

Hollywood cowers at this laff riot over ‘The Interview’

- The Washington Times

Movies may not be better than ever, as a Hollywood marketing slogan in yesteryear boasted they were, but the critics take movies seriously in North Korea. The chief movie critic in Pyongyang can kill a movie with a single review. He might even kill anybody who goes to see it.

Illustration on steps needed to protect U.S. intellectual property by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lessons from the Sony hack attack

The hacking attack of Sony Corp. and the compromising of its intellectual property should send a wake-up call to American business. If Sony can be hacked, so too can our companies that make defense technologies. This attack reveals that the very innovations that give us our competitive edge in the world, both commercially and strategically, are gravely at risk.

Illustration on continued access to Juvenile criminal records by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Allowing access to juveniles’ records hurts their chances of going straight

By incapacitating violent and dangerous offenders, incarceration can promote public safety. But a point of diminishing returns is reached as prisons sweep in more and more nonviolent, low-risk offenders. These circumstances are even more alarming when you look at the juvenile justice system and consider that 95 percent of youths in this system have committed nonviolent offenses, including some that weren’t even a crime when many of us were kids.

Illustration on Obama's normalization policy towards Cuba by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama adds Cuba to his list of sellouts

President Obama continues to embrace low-tier, go-it-alone executive actions to pad the last two years of his mistake-filled, empty-agenda presidency in a hopeless hunt for a legacy. His arrogant decision this week to re-establish diplomatic relations with communist Cuba is the latest example of a president desperately searching for something do without having to deal with Congress.

Illustration on the need to identify Islamic terrorism for what it is by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Suicide by political correctness

- The Washington Times

During its coverage of this week’s Islamic terrorist attack in Sydney, Australia, CNN ran a telling banner: “Motivation of suspect unknown.” Motivation unknown? Really?

A Rolling Stone article alleged a gang rape occurred at the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity house at the University of Virginia. The magazine has since issued an apology for the article, saying the reporter's trust in her source was misplaced. (Associated Press)

Bogus stories abound in our pathetic press

Will Rogers, the late American humorist and cornpone philosopher, once said, “All I know is what I read in the papers.” That statement earned him a place in “Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations.” Were he alive today, it would most likely be inviting widespread derision. Today’s newspapers abound with bogus stories.

Illustration on Congress' continuing resolution provisions eroding Constitutional liberties by Alexandr Hunter/The Washington Times

President and Congress are heedless to the limits of their power

When the government is waving at us with its right hand, so to speak, it is the government’s left hand that we should be watching. Just as a magician draws your attention to what he wants you to see so you will not observe how his trick is performed, last week presented a textbook example of public disputes masking hidden deceptions. Here is what happened.

The Ghost of Flight 93 Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Thwarting U.S. defenses will lead only to more American victims

The attack on a cafe in Sydney, Australia, by a self-described Islamic cleric with a long police record, left two hostages dead, along with the cleric. That incident, which was televised worldwide, was quickly eclipsed by the massacre of 145 people at an army-run school in Peshawar, Pakistan. How is the West responding to these and other atrocities? More important, how is the Muslim world responding?

Related Articles

Illustration on media protection of the Obama administration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How do we protect Barack Obama today?

- The Washington Times

About six weeks before the 2012 presidential election, I was walking through Rockefeller Center in New York when I heard a woman's voice calling my name. I hesitated before I turned around: As a conservative in Gotham, I never know if I'll be accosted by a raving leftist screaming "fascist!" at me. (Yes, that happened.)

Illustration on the moral and legal issues of CIA "torture" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The CIA and its torturers

When the head of the CIA's torture unit decided to destroy videotapes of his team's horrific work, he unwittingly set in motion a series of events that led to the release this week of the most massive, detailed documentation of unlawful behavior by high-ranking government officials and intentional infliction of pain on noncombatants by the United States government since the Civil War era. Here is the backstory.

Obama's Osama bin Laden Trophy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The White House keeps spinning

The release of a partisan Senate report on the CIA's past interrogation program has renewed the debate over the agency's use of enhanced interrogation methods. These are methods that the Obama administration has often denounced, even while taking credit for killing Osama bin Laden and while continuing the similarly controversial practice of lethal drone strikes.

Six years of mayhem

As his sixth year in office draws to a close, President Obama continues to add to our list of problems. Republicans in charge of Congress must unite to reverse the flawed policies, executive orders and rules and regulations that have negatively affected our economy, military, security, health care, education and personal and religious freedoms.

Keeping U.S. safe, free has costs

The world would be such a grand place if all children had something to eat, no one lied or cheated, courtesy was the rule and we all loved one another. The reality, however, is that there are some really evil people out there who could not care less about others and would just as soon kill some people as look at them.

This handout artist conception provided by NASA depicts multiple-transiting planet systems. (AP)

New respect for Pluto

These are definitely not the glory days of the American space program, but we should be thankful that, as Daniel Webster said of Dartmouth College, "there are those who love it." While many were busy protesting and rioting this week, mourning young black men shot by policemen by lying down in front of passenger trains, scientists at Johns Hopkins University's Applied Physics Laboratory turned their attention to a quieter and saner world.

Passersby exit an entrance to the main campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., Sunday, May 31, 1998. The university's endowment of nearly $13 billion makes it the richest in the world and, if ranked against Fortune 500 companies it would be in the top 25 percent, The Boston Globe reported Sunday. (AP Photo/Patricia McDonnell)

All about feelings: Ivy League law students now too 'traumatized' over Ferguson to take exams

- The Washington Times

It is a new educational phenomenon: Ivy League law students at three major universities - Columbia, Harvard and Georgetown University - are now exempt from taking final exams if they feel "traumatized" by the grand jury decisions made in Ferguson and New York City. The students are also being offered counseling if they need it. A few professors with impressive credentials now have a few questions.

Illustration on the damage done by false accusations of rape by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The feminist rape of reputation

Feminism is entering a new phase of the movement. You could call it the era of mea culpa. Feminism has rightly claimed "victim" status at the mercy of rapists, and now certain women have turned the tables and are making victims of men, but with slander, the rape of reputation. This isn't an "epidemic," as feminists have said rape is an epidemic, but the numbers are significant enough to make the headlines.

University of Alabama at Birmingham President Ray Watts,left, and UAB Vice President for Financial Affairs and Administration Allen Bolton, right,  address the media during a news conference to discuss the results of their athletics strategic planning process and closing of the UAB football football, rifle, and bowling programs, Tuesday, De. 2, 2014 in Birmingham. Ala. (AP Photo/Tamika Moore, AL.com) MAGS OUT

An Alabama university drops football

It takes strength, courage and resolve on the part of young men to play football. Sometimes it requires even more strength, courage and resolve on the part of college and university administrators not to play football.

Rift Between We and They illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The unfairness of Obamacare

Next year, when the employer mandate of Obamacare is activated, millions of Americans will be screaming in pain as their health insurance premiums skyrocket or as they lose their health insurance altogether. It will be just one more piece of the rapidly crumbling health care system that was forced upon the unsuspecting American people through political manipulation and deception.

Illustration on coming to terms with Islamic extremism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why fighting extremists can't be politically correct

Rarely do so many distinguished members of the foreign policy community gather in a single room. But this was the Great Hall of the United States Institute of Peace: a Washington "institution established and funded by Congress to increase the nation's capacity to manage international conflict without violence."

Illustration on Congress' attacks on the CIA over EITs by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Feinstein's tortured report

The "torture" report released Tuesday by California Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein's Senate Select Committee on Intelligence is the latest attempt to prove that the George W. Bush administration's "enhanced interrogation techniques" used on a small number of terrorist prisoners amounted to torture and that the CIA lied to congress about them. It is a political condemnation of CIA conduct meant to erect another barrier to effective interrogation of terrorists, and it is wrong in its statement of the law.