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Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer of N.Y., leads fellow Democratic Senators to meet supporters outside the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, July 25, 2017, after the Senate voted to start debating Republican legislation to tear down much of the Obama health care law. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Democrats’ ‘better deal’ is a raw deal

Theodore Roosevelt offered Americans a “Square Deal.” His fifth cousin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, gave us “The New Deal.” Modern Democrats, who have lost election after election, are now offering the country “A Better Deal.”

Passengers embark on a Princeton Branch New Jersey Transit train after a service disruption due to a lack of train engineers to operate it, Tuesday, July 18, 2017, in Princeton, N.J. The train is also known as the Dinky, as the train runs only a 2.7-mile route from Princeton Junction station in West Windsor, N.J., to Princeton University. (AP Photo/Kathy Willens) ** FILE**

Princeton on the prowl to emasculate men

- The Washington Times

Princeton University just announced a new position, the “Interpersonal Violence Clinician and Men’s Engagement Manager.” They’re seeking qualified candidates now. The best will be the man who most acts like a woman.

Hacking the Vote Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Maintaining vigilance against election hackers

This week, hackers from across the globe are gathering in Las Vegas at the annual DEF CON conference for an exercise ripped straight from news headlines — trying to hack U.S. election systems. It’s a unique exercise that has raised a lot of eyebrows in the election community. For me, it’s yet another moment to focus on the topic of election system security and the need for constant vigilance.

Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman    Associated Press photo

The Iran dilemma of the Saudi crown prince

The starting point for any policy that the new crown prince of Saudi Arabia, Mohammed bin Salman, adopts toward the Islamic Republic of Iran is to understand two basic facts.

Illustration on the president's struggles with Attorney General Jeff Sessions and his Justice Department by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

An unnecessary clash between Trump and Sessions

During the past two weeks, President Trump has made no secret of his unhappiness at the management of the Department of Justice (DOJ) under Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Actually, Mr. Trump seems most agitated at the growing parts of the Justice Department that are not under Mr. Sessions’ management.

White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders, left, joined by Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price, speaks to media aboard Air Force One, Monday, July 24, 2017, in Andrews Air Force Base, Md., en route to the 2017 National Scout Jamboree in Glen Jean, W.Va. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

‘Conform or else’: Democrats bully conservative women, minorities

On Monday, the Democrats were really excited about their new slogan, “A Better Deal: Better Skills, Better Jobs, Better Wages.” Widely ridiculed for being idiotic, here’s a slogan they could have chosen, which is much more honest about the current liberal agenda: “A Bully’s Deal: If You Ever Think For Yourself and Don’t Conform, We’ll Ruin Your Life.”

Illustration on the end of al Jazeera by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Does Al Jazeera deserve to die?

The Gulf Cooperation Council comprises six nations, all of them Arab, Muslim, ruled by royals, and fabulously wealthy thanks to vast reserves of petroleum. With so much in common, you might expect they’d be best friends forever. In recent weeks, however, the emir of Qatar, Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani, has been the odd monarch out.

Rob Goldstone About to Get Busted Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Who is colluding with whom?

In the Russia-Trump imbroglio let us be clear. We are now months into it. A dozen or so culprits have been fingered, some being actually quite amusing. You will be seeing more of the fat British music promoter, Rob Goldstone, who has been photographed wearing a baseball hat emblazoned with a word denoting a type of female anatomy on it.

FILE - In this July 17, 2016 file photo, then-Trump Campaign Chairman Paul Manafort talks to reporters on the floor of the Republican National Convention in Cleveland. The Senate Judiciary Committee has issued a subpoena to former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort seeking his testimony at a public hearing on Wednesday, July 26, 2017.  (AP Photo/Matt Rourke, File)

Robert Mueller team shows history of crossing ethical lines

- The Washington Times

President Trump’s advisers and defenders in trying to undermine former FBI Director Robert Mueller’s investigation of the Trump campaign’s alleged pre-election “collusion” with Vladimir Putin’s Russia are pointing out that Mr. Mueller and another former FBI director, James Comey, are longtime buddies.

Obama Plan to Usurp the Senate's Legislative Power Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Paris climate scheme revelation

The New York Times on Aug. 24, 2014, broke a major news story: “Obama pushing Climate Accord in Lieu of Treaty.” It’s a clumsy headline — no one dared claim the Kyoto Protocol was anything other than a treaty requiring Senate ratification, and even the Grey Lady calls it the “Kyoto Accord.”

Illustration on the dangerous precedent of the Charlie Gard case by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The lesson from poor little Charlie Gard

The sad news broke Monday that Charlie Gard’s parents have given up the fight to save their 11-month-old baby’s life. “The window of opportunity has been lost,” due to time wasted in the parents’ legal battles to save the child’s life. “It’s too late for Charlie,” family attorney Grant Armstrong said. “The damage has been done.”

Russian Insecurity Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How the “Long Telegram” explains Putin’s Russia

Russian experts, politicians and television’s talking heads are constantly wondering whether Vladimir Putin’s Russia is trying to reconstruct the old Soviet Union with its extended empire and aspirations, asking why else the country that gave up communism would invade Ukraine, threaten the Baltic states, interfere in Syria and even try to sabotage an American election.

Related Articles

FILE - In this Dec. 1, 2016, file photo, President-elect Donald Trump greets workers during a visit to the Carrier Corp. factory in Indianapolis. More than 300 Carrier Corp. workers were being laid off Thursday, July 20, 2017, from the company's Indianapolis factory as part of an outsourcing of jobs to Mexico that drew criticism last year from then-presidential candidate Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

The benefit of putting health care aside

"It ain't over till it's over," Yogi Berra said in his famous aphorism about losing. And that may eventually apply to the Republicans' failed attempt to "repeal and replace" President Obama's Affordable Care Act, otherwise known as Obamacare.

Turkey and NATO Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

NATO alliance helping dictators

President Trump found NATO wanting. Then true to form, he acted like a CEO, not a president, serving notice that things had to change, or else. The "or else" he left undefined, creating angst among politicians and policy elites who, sensing their own failures, chose to focus on his manners not his message. Mr. Trump's poor political decorum notwithstanding, his policy judgment is right. NATO has to change.

Illustration on the border wall and security by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond the good news of the wall

Based upon President Trump's promise to secure the U.S. Border with Mexico, illegal immigration plummeted during the first half of 2017. In the first three months of his presidency, illegal border crossings fell by nearly 75 percent from that of the previous year and represented a historic low in the modern history of the Border Patrol. What President Trump accomplished is nothing short of a miracle, but he can't continue to do it alone. Border security is not the sole responsibility of the White House; it's also the responsibility of Congress.

Robert Mueller. (Associated Press)

The swamp strikes back

- The Washington Times

A lot of snakes and scorpions live with the alligators in the swamp, and there are even more dangerous monsters there. No swamp creature is deadlier than a Washington lawyer.

Amazon Busts Through the Bricks and Mortar Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Embracing disruption and reinvention

In every age, civilizations embrace technologies that disrupt the status quo. Amazon and its internet brethren may be menacing to brick and mortar establishments but only because they make our lives richer and easier -- and there is nothing new about engineers and entrepreneurs doing that.

Don't give police license to kill

I wonder how it is that people who have called 911 get shot by the responding police officers. In Minneapolis last weekend an Australian woman, Justine Damond, called 911 to report an assault ("Questions remain surrounding fatal Minnesota police shooting," Web, July 18).

Undoing U.K. mess no cakewalk

It is probably correct that Brexit will not be easy for the Brits ("Brexit won't be painless for U.K., say experts," Web, July 18). However, it provides a valuable learning experience for those who steered Great Britain into that nest of European socialism many years ago.

Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks at a news conference to announce an international cybercrime enforcement action at the Department of Justice, Thursday, July 20, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Reforming government robbery

There's nothing "civil" about civil asset forfeiture. It's a law enforcement practice of seizing assets of suspects, who may or may not have broken the law, and it invites abuse. But Attorney General Jeff Sessions wants to expand it.

House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., gestures to employees as he takes a tour of the manufacturing floor at a New Balance athletic shoe factory Thursday, July 20, 2017, in Lawrence, Mass. (AP Photo/Stephan Savoia)

A resurgence of the arsenal

President Trump has taken the "Made in America" stamp on American consumer goods and put it to wider use as a slogan to inspire an economic and manufacturing renaissance. He's not the first. Bob Hope was the face of a similar campaign four decades ago, with limited success. For consumers weary of goods with "Made in China" invariably stamped on them, this is a welcome thing.

Alexander Zakharchenko, the leader of pro-Russian rebels in Donetsk, meets with the media after talks on cease-fire in Ukraine in Minsk, Belarus, Friday, Sept. 5, 2014. Ukraine and the Russian-backed rebels have signed a cease-fire deal that starts in less than two hours, a European official at the talks said Friday. (AP Photo)

East Ukraine becomes a pawn again

With the backdrop of the Russia hysteria in the American media and negotiations proceeding over a variety of issues between the Kremlin and the White House, the miserable, frozen conflict of East Ukraine is once again a pawn in the great game between world powers.

President Donald Trump listens during a "Made in America," roundtable event in the East Room of the White House, Wednesday, July 19, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump facing most hostile press coverage in history

Over and over again, I, and many others, have stated that President Donald Trump has received the most hostile press coverage of any sitting president in U.S. history. Democrats laughed and claimed that former President Barack Obama was treated worse, but the facts don't lie.

In this June 22, 2017, file photo Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., arrives for a Senate Republican meeting on a health reform bill on Capitol Hill in Washington. McCain has been diagnosed with a brain tumor after doctors removed a blood clot above his left eye last week, his office said in a statement July 19. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File) **FILE**

John McCain: In cancer, he unites

- The Washington Times

Now, even those who can't stand his politics -- who've fought him tooth and nail over policy, legislation, RINO-ism and globalism -- wish him well, hope for the best and send him prayers. This is how God works: through struggles, a light.