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Illustration on accurately identifying Islamist terror by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Freedom, security — and the truth

With blizzards, deflated footballs and green-lipsticked YouTube personalities dominating recent news, it was easy to miss two hugely important truth-telling moments. If only they had received the same coverage as air pressure in NFL regulation footballs.

A New York City snowplow, loaded with salt, sits parked in midtown Manhattan as light snow falls, Monday, Jan. 26, 2015. Northeast residents are girding for a heavy snowstorm that could bury communities from northern New Jersey to southern Maine in up to 2 feet of snow. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan)

Another snow job

Today, politicians and their ideological fellow travelers in the media use the normal cycles of the seasons to promote “climate change.”

Illustration on the failed policy of enemy combatant internment by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The al-Marri enigma

Ali Saleh al-Marri is a convicted conspirator who entered the United States before Sept. 11, 2001, in order to create a dreaded sleeper cell here that might someday launch an attack on Americans similar to what we witnessed earlier this month in Paris. When the feds woke from their slumber on Sept. 11, they wisely began to search immigration records for persons who came here with no discernible purpose from places known to spawn terrorist groups and who had overstayed their visas. Al-Marri was one such person.

Illustration on heroism replaced by narcissism by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Heroes in the age of the selfie

Heroes, real ones, are getting harder to find. One of the few remaining annual surprises in the typical State of the Union address is the president’s introduction of his “mystery guest.” President Reagan introduced the first one in 1982, celebrating one Leonard Skutnik for an extraordinary act of courage.

Conservatism has blossomed into the major intellectual and political force of our time. (Rod Lamkey Jr/ The Washington Times)

Conservatism is now everywhere

There is a problem with the Internet. Its commentary is too often dominated by pinheads. H.L. Mencken used to complain that only idiots write letters to the editor. That might have been true of his day — the 1920s and 1930s — but in our time writers of letters to the editor of newspapers and even of websites are occasionally quite well-informed and even lucid. But others, I am afraid, are indeed pinheads, sitting in their underwear back home, foaming at the mouth, believing that the whole world is profoundly interested in their every word, until the authorities arrive at their homes to take them away.

Illustration on threatened government meddling in the private sector world of sports by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Jumping offsides on ‘Deflategate’

Super Bowl XLIX (49) will be played this Sunday. Sadly, the anticipated matchup between the AFC champion New England Patriots and NFC champion Seattle Seahawks has already had the wind knocked out of its sails — or, in this case, the air out of its footballs.

The Democratic assault on free speech

- The Washington Times

Everybody’s for free speech — until somebody says something he doesn’t like. But the genius of the First Amendment is that it is so direct and plain that even a lawyer or a judge can understand it.

Illustration on the Obama administrations role in Iranian nuclear ambitions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s price for Obama’s coveted legacy

The importance of any political event is best measured against its opponents’ reactions. By that yardstick, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s agreement to speak about the dangers of Iran’s pursuit of nuclear weapons before a joint session of Congress is already enormously significant.

Illustration on American's diminished economic freedom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Regaining lost economic freedom

If you were to rank all the countries of the world based on their level of economic freedom, you’d think the United States would be a shoo-in for first place, right? Surely we would be at least somewhere in the top five.

Illustration on the fall of Yemen by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Yemen’s collapse demonstrates Obama’s foreign policy failures

Last Tuesday night, President Obama assured the American people that their nation is secure because of his leadership. His “steady, persistent resolve,” Mr. Obama proclaimed in his State of the Union speech, has resulted in a “safer, more prosperous world.”

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Move on out, Terry McAuliffe

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe brings his form of leftist tripe to Virginia ("Gun control advocates, opponents square off in Richmond," Web, Jan. 19). The commonwealth's residents know history, particularly Mr. McAuliffe's.

Rep. Curt Clawson, R-Fla., does a sound check as he prepares to give the Tea Party response to President Barack Obama's State of the Union address, at the National Press Club in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

Tea party leader suggests emerging unity between establishment GOP and the grassroots

- The Washington Times

There's emerging unity between tea party and establishment Republicans says Taylor Budowich, executive director of the Tea Party Express. The national political action committee organized an official grassroots response to the State of the Union address by Rep. Curt Clawson, a Florida Republican who won his office in a special election by 40 percentage points last year, with much bedrock conservative support. Mr. Budowich finds evidence of this unity in the response itself.

Ms. Lynch is a tough prosecutor, more lawyer and prosecutor than politician, and thus very different from the man she is to replace. (Associated Press)

Questions for Loretta Lynch

Loretta Lynch, the president's nominee to replace Eric Holder as the U.S. attorney general, faces question-and-answer time next week, and this will be the first opportunity for the new Republican majority to demonstrate that there's a new and more just world on Capitol Hill. She will not necessarily face a hostile panel of the Senate Judiciary Committee, nor should she. She is a known quantity as U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York, first appointed by President Clinton and reappointed by President Obama.

President Barack Obama shakes hands after delivering the State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Mandel Ngan, Pool)

31.7 million viewers: State of the Union address was least watched in 15 years

- The Washington Times

Nielsen reveals the preliminary news about President Obama's State of the Union address: It garnered an estimated audience of 31.7 million people across 13 cable and broadcast networks, making it the least watched address in the last 15 years, when former President Bill Clinton‘s finale garnered drew 31.4 million viewers in 2000.

'Islamophobic' loaded, inaccurate term

The term "Islamophobia" may be the most misused term in the contemporary lexicon. Standard dictionary definition of the word "phobic" is an exaggerated or an irrational fear of something. Given the horrific savagery that has been so prominently in evidence throughout the world over the past 20 years in the name of Islam, it is not possible for any thoughtful human being to have an "exaggerated" or an "irrational" fear of Islam.

Give single mothers college chance

Peter Morici's language about single mothers in the op-ed about President Obama's proposal for free community college is problematic ("Obama's bogus community college giveaway," Web, Jan. 14). Mr. Morici creates a vision of the impoverished single mother who lacks confidence, suffers emotional distress, lacks reading and math literacy and is waiting in the wings to enter and disrupt institutions of higher education. He resorts to fear mongering to falsely warn of this "risky" type of student in effort to dissuade the public's approval of Obama's plan.

The EPA’s command-and-control climate science

After hearing Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Gina McCarthy speak at this month's annual meeting of the American Meteorological Society in Phoenix, Arizona, I realized that the United States is truly in a world of trouble from too much pollution — not the "carbon" kind, but the ideological kind.

Community Outreach through Athletics Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Choosing the challenging road to reconciliation

A few days ago I had the pleasure of sitting down with Edward Mullins, president of the Sergeants Benevolent Association of the New York Police Department, to discuss potential ways of improving community-police relationships. He has been working with outstanding community leaders like Pastor A.R. Bernard, and they sincerely want to achieve a highly successful outcome to a problem of trust that has spread throughout the nation.

A downfall advanced by bad jewelry

It was a 2,800 carat diamond necklace that many people thought was ugly and it may be that Queen Marie Antoinette never either wore it or saw it, but it made a bitterly ironic contribution to the collapse of her world and her consequent death.

Turkey's Cyprus incursion nothing new

Guy Taylor's "Newsmaker Interview" with Turkish Cypriot negotiator Ergun Olgun ("Cypriot union threatened by dispute over oil and gas rights," Web, Jan. 11) is a public relations ploy by Turkey to lure the public away from Turkey's latest violation of international law: its 'gunboat diplomacy' in the eastern Mediterranean and incursion into Cyprus' Economic Exclusive Zone (EEZ).

Illustration on accusations of racism against the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

Al Sharpton vs. Hollywood

Last week, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences unveiled its 2015 Oscar nominations. Popular movies, including "The Imitation Game," "Boyhood" and "The Theory of Everything," received some positive recognition. Other films, including "The LEGO Movie" and my personal favorite, "Mr. Turner," received lesser nominations or were snubbed in certain categories.

President Barack Obama waves before giving his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The state of the president

The Constitution requires presidents to provide Congress with periodic information on the "state of the union" and President George Washington delivered the required information in a speech to a joint session of Congress in 1790. That turned out to be an unfortunate precedent. Most of his successors haven't been able to resist making it an occasion for a speech, either.

Volunteers tie the wooden cross that was carried through the streets of Etna, Pa., a Pittsburgh suburb, to the larger cross in the cemetery where their annual "Drama of The Cross", service was done on Good Friday, Friday, April 18, 2014. Clergymen from Christian churches in the borough organize a trek with volunteers carrying the wooden cross through borough streets to the cemetery as part of their services for the holiday. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

A Christian's response to insult

In the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo terrorist attack, it's worth recalling how Christians respond to insult, by turning the other cheek, forgiving our enemies, and loving those who persecute us.

The rich pay more than their fair share

Punitive overtaxation on the most productive, and excessive redistribution, shuts down long term economic growth and the American Dream.

Illustration on the need for sanctions against Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The case for deadline-triggered sanctions

Experienced negotiators know this: The side most willing to walk away from the table generally wins. The side that seems desperate for a deal loses. Yet President Obama is telling the entire world that he needs an agreement with Iran's rulers more than they need an agreement with him.

Illustration on pro-life millennial voters by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The abortion intensity gap

In 2008 and 2012, the Democrats trampled over Republicans when it came to mobilizing and recruiting the younger generation. In 2008, Barack Obama beat John McCain among 18- to 34-year-olds by 34 points; in 2012, Mitt Romney lost by 23 points to President Obama in the same age group. It was a trouncing by any standard.