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Warren G. Harding (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Donald Trump, the unstoppable force of nature — maybe

- The Washington Times

The dogs bark, the flies scatter, the gasbags at the conventions send enormous clouds of toxic waste to hover over Cleveland and Philadelphia that won’t dissipate until Labor Day, and the caravan moves on. Election Day approaches, and rarely have so many been so disappointed with the choice before us.

Fathers Absent from "Black Lives Matter" Movement Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter’s real agenda

Unless you have been “off the grid” for a while, you have heard a lot in the news about Black Lives Matter. This “movement” has gotten a lot of press and some notable praise from celebrities and politicians, including positive mentions from President Obama. But I suspect that most people, including many who have tweeted #blacklivesmatter, have not visited its website.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton's position in support of the Democratic base by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hillary Clinton’s mixed messages

- The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter, Black Panthers, Occupy Wall Street, Socialists, Communists, those who want to strip God from their party platform, LGBTQ activists, Planned Parenthood, Hispanics, white-working class union workers, Wall Street, and climate-change mongers, all have a place in the Democratic Party.

Illustration on the relationship between Pakistani government corruption and the rise of Islamist violence by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

How religious extremists thrive

As Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton spar over security and foreign aid, those of us living in Pakistan wonder how we ended up in the rearview mirror of the debate. American taxpayers spend billions of dollars per year in Pakistan — a nuclear state with religious extremists baying at the door — and next door in Afghanistan, where the Taliban are ensconced.

Church and State Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending religious liberty

I write with a deep and growing concern about the future of religious liberty in the United States.

Mike Pence, Conservative Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Why Pence makes sense

Whenever I talk to conservatives across the country about the presidential election, a common refrain is that they find Donald Trump refreshing in many ways. They like that he eschews political correctness and promises to stand up for ordinary Americans against the elites.

SM-3 Missile Defense Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Defending against the growing missile threat

Both Iran and North Korea are rogue nations developing and testing new missile technologies at an alarming rate. Iran threatens U.S. forces and has missile technology to carry out those threats. North Korea has successfully tested missiles that can be fired from submarines and is threatening to use them.

Illustration on expanding health care choices for veterans by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Remodeling veterans’ health care for the 21st century

From 2007 to 2009, I served as undersecretary for health in the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA). Overseeing the Veterans Health Administration (VHA), I often saw the best of what our nation offers veterans recovering from the wounds of war in a system staffed by committed health professionals devoted to providing quality care.

Fethullah Gulen     The Washington Times

A Gulen factor in Turkey’s turmoil?

As the dust settles in Turkey following the bloodiest coup in recent history, questions continue to surface about who was behind the recent uprising. In the midst of the unfolding drama, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accused rival Fethullah Gulen of being behind the putsch.

Clinton Scandals Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A vivid symbol of scandal

Democrats gathered for their convention in Philadelphia know Hillary Clinton did not escape her latest bout with scandal unscathed. While Hillary once more remained one step ahead of the law, she is several steps behind the public. She could not have picked a worse time for her latest foray into the ethical morass.

North Korea Foreign Minister Ri Yong Ho talks to a reporter after a break during the 23rd Asean Regional meeting in Vientiane, Laos, Tuesday, July 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Sakchai Lalit)

Disappointment with China

China’s reaction to the decision of the Permanent Court of Arbitration in The Hague that there was no evidence that China had exercised exclusive control over the waters or resources historically in the South China Sea was disappointing but expected.

Illustration on the Democratic National Convention by Tim Brinton

Chaos at the Democratic National Convention

Cleveland versus Philadelphia. So many predicted a cataclysmic disaster for the Republicans during their convention. Yet, it ended up being an organized, well-run event showcasing the reformation of the Republican Party and propelling Donald Trump to the biggest post-convention bounce for either party since 2000.

Related Articles

Illustration of Ted Cruz as Brutus by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Ted Cruz writes a political suicide note

- The Washington Times

Cleveland -- As Charles Krauthammer put it, Texas Sen. Ted Cruz wrote "the longest suicide note in U.S. History," and it was a disjointed, contradictory one that revealed a deeply conflicted and narcissistic man. A principled stand for the party and country? Hardly.

Sheldon Adelson. (Associated Press)

Now it's time to pay for the fun

- The Washington Times

Money is not the mother's milk of politics, as the bundler's cliche goes, but homemade vanilla ice cream, rich and creamy. Donald Trump hasn't been getting any. Not much and not lately, anyway.

Illustration on the dilemma of reform in a nation's leadership by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Cause and effect

In 1926, speaking about the Declaration of Independence on its 150th anniversary, President Calvin Coolidge noted the unique philosophy behind the creation of the United States: "We cannot continue to enjoy the result, if we neglect and abandon the cause."

Clinton not off hook yet

In light of FBI Director James Comey's 'no-indictment' determination of Hillary Clinton, many people have become angry or depressed, chanting "A Clinton won again" ("Why the FBI let Hillary Clinton off," Web, July 11). Ronald Kessler notes that Mr. Comey did not want to take on "an unwinnable case" under Section 793(f) of the U.S. criminal code. However, as a glass-half-full kind of person, I see an opportunity here.

Don't give corruption the wheel

July 4, 1776 is a holy day on the calendar of American history and a turning point in world affairs. July 5, 2016 is now a day that shall live in infamy, because it was the day the FBI decided that all men, but not all women, may be equal before the law.

Illustration on the loss of fighting spirit in the U.S. armed forces by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Don't give up the ship'

The recent release of the investigative report on the "surrender" of two U.S. Navy heavily armed, 48-foot Riverine Coastal Patrol Boats in the North Arabian Sea on Jan. 12 to slightly smaller, armed Iranian Revolutionary Guard Corps Navy center-console fishing-type boats was more than an embarrassment for the Navy.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton addresses the The National Education Association (NEA) Representative Assembly in Washington, Tuesday, July 5, 2016. (AP Photo/Molly Riley)

Apple polishing on the stump

Hillary Clinton took pandering to a new level when she addressed delegates to the National Education Association's (NEA) convention on July 5.

Illustration on the excess brought out in partisans at election time by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Where fools rush in

Presidential campaigns bring out the best and the worst in the American partisan. The nominating conventions evoke exuberance and awe, excessive indulgence and sometimes even quiet dignity. Some speakers express humility and others parade a supercilious arrogance.

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry speaks during a press conference with Britain's Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson at the Foreign Office in London, Tuesday, July 19, 2016. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, pool)

The nightmarish results of Muslim outreach

When President Obama entered office, he dreamed that his hope-and-change messaging and his references to his familial Islamic roots would win over the Muslim world. The soon-to-be Nobel Peace Prize laureate would make the United States liked in the Middle East. Then terrorism would decrease.

Illustration on Trump's acceptance speech by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The speech Donald Trump should give tonight to win it all

- The Washington Times

Tonight in Cleveland, Donald Trump will accept the Republican nomination for president of the United States. His ascent is the most astonishing political story of our lifetimes, and he achieved it with breathtaking fearlessness, cleverness, wit and smarts. Most importantly, he had from the start an extraordinary sixth sense of the anger, betrayal and anxiety roiling voters and driving their desire to smash the existing order.

Iran Missile Factory Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama's Iran delusions

July 14 was the first anniversary of President Obama's nuclear agreement with Iran. Because the agreement renders our intelligence community deaf and blind to Iran's nuclear weapons program, the new report from a German intelligence agency that Iran is violating the deal comes as no surprise.

BOOK REVIEW: 'This Brave New World: India, China and the United States'

On a crisp November morning last year, when Donald Trump's candidacy was little more than a cloud the size of a man's fist -- and the fist of a man with tiny hands, at that -- it occurred to me that if it ever did take off, a lot of its success would be due to his strongly protectionist stance on global trade.

FILE - This April 28, 2010 file photo shows the Colstrip Steam Electric Station, a coal-fired power plant in Colstrip, Mont. The Colstrip plant, a coal plant serving utility customers across the Pacific Northwest, has agreed to shut down two of its four units by 2022 under a settlement announced Tuesday, July 12, 2016, with environmentalists who sued over alleged air pollution violations. (AP Photo/Matt Brown, file)

Foolishness over fossil fuels

The masterminds who put their heads together to "improve" the planet sometimes only bump those heads together. Environmentalists have confidently -- and arrogantly -- declared that their "green" policies are based on "settled science," but evidence continues to trickle in to dispute that. On paper, saving the world is as elementary as ridding it of fossil fuels. Experience, however, teaches that "If it ain't broke, don't fix it."