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Illustration on the cultural importance of Shakespeare and his play, 'Julius Caesar'              The Washington Times

Donald Trump Julius Caesar mockery reduces Shakespeare

Whether the famous dead Roman is a look-alike for Donald Trump, with a blond comb-over and a long red tie, a cool black dude in a tailored suit suggesting Barack Obama, or a 1930s Orson Welles with a Sam Browne belt resembling Benito Mussolini, the character has captured the imagination of public and players since Shakespeare wrote it more than four centuries ago.

Illustration on the fiscal plight of Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A sinking feeling in Puerto Rico

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is drowning. The island, so popular with tourists, is $123 billion in debt. That’s more debt than the $18 billion bankruptcy filed by the city of Detroit in 2013. In May, San Juan declared a form of bankruptcy after creditors filed lawsuits demanding their money. A federal district judge appointed by Chief Justice John Roberts will handle the case.

Illustration on german passivity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond German pacifism

“The Germans are either at your feet or at your throat,” wrote the Roman historian Tacitus 2,000 years ago. Sadly, that axiom is not just ancient history. In the last century, Germany started two world wars, caused the death and suffering of tens of millions, and was responsible for the unspeakable horror of the Holocaust.

President Donald Trump speaks during a rally, Wednesday, June 21, 2017, in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. (AP Photo/Charlie Neibergall)

Trump and his generals

Donald Trump earned respect from the Washington establishment for appointing three of the nation’s most accomplished generals to direct his national security policy: James Mattis (secretary of defense), H.R. McMaster (national security adviser) and John Kelly (secretary of homeland security).

Sponsor of Terror Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How Qatar threatens peace

Qatar, a small oil- and gas-rich nation in the Arabian Peninsula, has been boycotted by its neighbors, Saudi Arabia, the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain and Egypt. Other nations, including Libya, Maldives, Mauritania, Jordan, Djibouti and Senegal, also have commenced severe diplomatic measures against Qatar.

Illustration of American consul Raymond Geist              The Washington Times

A disingenuous handling of the Jewish refugee issue in ‘Genius’

Albert Einstein was one of the greatest scientists of all time. His contributions to physics revolutionized our understanding of the universe. The current television series based on his life is appropriately titled “Genius.” But did he also help facilitate a mass rescue of Jews from Germany?

In this file photo taken Aug. 31, 2015, a cow grazes at Hickory Hill Milk in Edgefield, S.C. (Susan Ardis/The State via AP)

The fallacy of ‘unhealthy competition’

Just when you thought liberals were focusing only on destroying our government, there is now ample evidence that fellow travelers have been working diligently to destroy the ideas and dreams of our young people.

Illustration on Chinese encroachment on South America by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

China’s encroachment into Latin America

China’s June 14 poaching of Panama, helping it to switch diplomatic relations from Taiwan to China, belies a growing campaign by Beijing to seek greater economic and strategic influence in Latin America at the expense of the United States.

Illustration on the virtues of Kurdish independence by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The case for Kurdish independence

On Sept. 25, Kurdistan will hold a referendum for independence. For a number of reasons, the United States should welcome this development and support the referendum.

Illustration on the 100th anniversary of the Bolshevik Revolution by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The tragic Bolshevik legacy, 100 years on

This year marks 100 years since the Bolshevik Revolution took place in Russia. That year, the centuries-old czardom of Russia and the brief liberal democracy that replaced it collapsed and was soon replaced by the Soviet Union, the world’s first stable communist state.

FILE - This June 7, 2017, file photo, Jodie Ferguson leaves flowers at a small memorial for the victims of a fatal shooting in Sandy, Utah. Sandy Police Chief Kevin Thacker spoke at a news conference Tuesday, June 20, 2017, after questions were raised about whether police missed chances to help victim Memorez Rackley when she reported her ex-boyfriend was threatening her and her children. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)

Making sense of senseless shooting

There are events that force a “time out.” One just occurred. Pausing to think about it, is worth the time.

Illustration on the history of the Department of Justice by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A tortuous start for Justice

If you think the Department of Justice is grabbing the headlines these days, on June 22, 1870, the news was even bigger. Congress seemingly remedied the federal government’s legal shortcomings that day when it created the department.

In this image from Senate Television video, Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., pauses as he speaks Wednesday, June 14, 2017, on the Senate floor at the Capitol in Washington, about the shooting at the Republican congressional baseball practice. In remarks made on June 22, Mr. Sanders told an audience that the U.S. is headed in an authoritarian direction under President Trump. (Senate Television via AP) **FILE**

Bern victims pile up in Democratic Party

- The Washington Times

If the anti-Trump fever the media keeps telling us all about cannot break through in Georgia’s 6th District, then it truly is nothing but a phantom that exists nowhere but in the minds of media elites hysterically trying to will President Trump out of existence.

Related Articles

Farewell to the valedictorians

It's commencement time at high schools across the fruited plain, and either the kids in Rutherford County, Tenn., are extraordinarily smart or their teachers have given up. The county's highly ranked Central Magnet School has 48 valedictorians -- a fourth of the class.

A gunman shot at lawmakers during a congressional baseball practice in Alexandria, Virginia, Wednesday. Rep. Steve Scalise was injured in the attack. (Associated Press)

Shooting exposes the deep anger at the heart of the culture

The shooting of a senior GOP congressional leader, Hill staffers and Capitol police officers is a sober reminder of how deeply anger and division have penetrated our politics and our culture. We are forgetting the basics, failing to foster civility and respect for one another in America. Both political parties need to take inventory on how to restore civility in our nation and calm the political tension.

FBI Evidence Response Team members mark evidence at the scene of a multiple shooting in Alexandria, Va., Wednesday, June 14, 2017, involving House Majority Whip Steve Scalise of La., and others during a congressional baseball practice. (AP Photo/Cliff Owen)

We don't need gun control -- we need Democrat control

- The Washington Times

Terry McAuliffe, Virginia's Democratic governor, suggested gun control was needed in the aftermath of a shooting that left Republican Rep. Steve Scalise injured. But given all the angry rhetoric and uprisings those on the left have fueled lately, it would seem guns aren't really the problem. Democrats are.

Illustrations on the implications of the religious Left's renewed participation in politics by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The religious left's second coming

The religious left feels left out. According to an article in The New York Times, liberal clergy feel excluded from the political arena and blame the religious right for occupying what they once believed was their exclusive territory. They are, according to the story's headline, "seeking to break right's grip on nation's moral agenda."

Obamacare Death Panel Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Saving money but costing lives

Buried deep within Obamacare is a provision that takes away health care from you and your doctors, by taking away payment for critical health care that may be needed to save your life. It is called The Independent Payment Advisory Board (IPAB).

On Nov. 11, 1989, East German border guards are seen through a gap in the Berlin Wall after demonstrators pulled down a segment of the wall at the Brandenburg Gate, Berlin. Associated Press photo

When the Berlin Wall began to crack

Thirty years ago this week Ronald Reagan stood up on a podium in what was then West Berlin, framed by the Brandenburg Gate behind him. Through a thick sheet of bulletproof glass, he gazed at the ugly concrete symbol of the Cold War, the Berlin Wall, and addressed the most famous words of his presidency to Mikhail Gorbachev, the leader of the Soviet empire: "Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall."

Illustration on the U.S. ambassador to the Holy See by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An able ambassador to the Holy See

America should welcome the nomination of Callista Gingrich as the 11th U.S. ambassador to the Holy See. Mrs. Gingrich brings the necessary skill sets to navigate the sometimes labyrinthine interface between politics and the Catholic Church.

Matching Government Tenants with Jobs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A path out of poverty

Government should be a means of empowerment, not dependency, as well as a safety net. As President Trump discusses building America's workforce, public housing has a role in that discussion. Those who receive housing assistance must have a path toward jobs, wealth creation and economic improvement. We must remove attitudes, regulations, policies and programs that reinforce dependence.

In this May 3, 2017, file photo, FBI Director James Comey listens on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

How 'showboater' Comey screwed up

What gets James Comey in trouble is that he leaked official memos that were most probably classified. He should have turned them over to the FBI or somewhere else in the Justice Department and then simply kept his mouth shut. And if he didn't trust anybody at the department, he should have sent the memos on to the congressional intelligence committees (and thereby been protected as a whistleblower).

President Donald Trump walks to his vehicle after visiting MedStar Washington Hospital Center in Washington, Wednesday, June 14, 2017, where House Majority Leader Steve Scalise of La. was taken after being shot in Alexandria, Va., during a Congressional baseball practice. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The consent of the governed

Last week, when former FBI Director James Comey gave his long-awaited public testimony about his apparently rough-and-tumble relationship with President Trump, he painted a bleak picture. The essence of Mr. Comey's testimony was that the president asked him to drop an investigation of retired Lt. Gen. Michael Flynn -- Mr. Trump's former national security adviser -- and then asked him to do so in return for keeping his job as FBI director and then fired him for not obeying his order.

The wrong cure for a real crisis

One of the problems with a book titled "The Crisis of the Middle-Class Constitution" is that, more than two centuries after ratification of that document, we still have no real consensus on exactly what is meant by the term "middle class."

A few morals go a long way

It seems that so many in the world disobey God's Ten Commandments on a regular basis -- and in a big way. But just think: If everyone obeyed the Fifth Commandment ("Thou shalt not kill") we could all live in our homes and walk or ride safely and freely on streets and across bridges anywhere in the world.

Comey's coup

The malice aforethought and intent evident in former FBI Director James Comey's Senate testimony last week make it crystal-clear that Mr. Comey was actively working for and planning a soft coup from his very first meeting with President Trump. No other conclusion can be drawn from Mr. Comey's immediate efforts to interrupt his and the president's conversations.