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Douglas MacArthur      Associated Press photo

Things fall apart

What ever became of that America? What ever became of that can-do nation? What has happened to us?

Illustration on the gradual revelation of the Obama administration's true nature by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Taking back America

Never in my lifetime did I believe this great nation would be taken down and withdrawn from its world leadership position by its own leadership.

Illustration by Clement, National Post, Toronto, Canada

Troubled times for Angela Merkel

Angela Merkel tops the Forbes magazine list of the hundred most powerful women in the world for the fourth consecutive year, but these are difficult days for the German chancellor.

Illustration on the prescient warnings of Reagan's "A Time to Choose" speech by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A Reagan refresher course on freedom

- The Washington Times

On Oct. 27, 1964 — 50 years ago next Monday — a tall, handsome man strode to a podium draped with red, white and blue bunting. Perhaps only he — and the most savvy political observers — knew it at the time, but the speaker was about to launch a transformational political movement.

FILE - In this Jan. 30, 2010, file photo, Vice President Joe Biden, left, with his son Hunter, right, at the Duke Georgetown NCAA college basketball game in Washington. Hunter Biden is expressing regret for being discharged from the Navy Reserve amid published reports that he tested positive for cocaine. The Wall Street Journal reports that Hunter Biden failed the drug test last year and was discharged in February. In a statement issued Thursday, Oct. 16, Biden doesn't say why he was discharged. He says he's embarrassed that his actions led to his discharge and that he respects the Navy's decision. The vice president's office declined to comment.(AP Photo/Nick Wass, File)

The Hunter Biden chronicles

Everything you need to know about Beltway nepotism, corporate cronyism and corruption can be found in the biography of Robert Hunter Biden.

Illustration on excessive government regulation of oil by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

Opening the tap for crude-oil exports

Not many years ago, the idea of “peak oil” was all the rage. The concept, first identified in 1956 by M. King Hubbert, a geologist working for Shell Oil, held that there was a finite amount of oil in the ground and that oil production would peak in the 1970s and then decline.

Underfunding of Charter Schools in D.C. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

D.C. charter schools deserve equal funding

As Washington gets ready to select a new mayor, D.C. voters should insist that to get their vote, a candidate should pledge to provide all students in the District equitable treatment when it comes to school funding.

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Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal has found Democrats joining his side as he rallies for school choice, even some who helped kill a voucher bill before Hurricane Katrina. (Associated Press)

EDITORIAL: Cooling the car

Years ago, there was a hole in the ozone layer that was going to kill us all. Once the government banned aerosol hairspray and Freon, the stuff that made air conditioners and refrigerators work, the frenzy subsided. Now the government-mandated replacement for Freon, a chemical that goes by the name of R-134a, will end life as we know it. The White House is about to add the chemical to the list of prohibited substances, along with asbestos, anthrax and carbon dioxide.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Why We Bite the Invisible Hand'

If you go to a bookstore, you'll find an abundance of books deploring the very nature of capitalism. Hence, it's a pleasure to find one author who will buck the trend and present the flawed logic of the anti-capitalists.

FILE - This undated file image made available by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) shows the Ebola virus. In a second, smaller Ebola outbreak, at least 69 people, including eight health workers, are believed to have been infected according to a study that was led by the World Health Organization and researchers from France and Canada and published online Wednesday, Oct. 15, 2014, by the New England Journal of Medicine. The outbreak that began in July in the Democratic Republic of Congo is similar to earlier ones in that central African region, genetic testing of viruses shows. (AP Photo/Centers for Disease Control, File)

CHARLES: Ebola, more vital facts untold

With countless unknowns surrounding the recent discovery, transmission, infection rates, and potentially exponential growth of Ebola in the United States in the months ahead, trust is vital.

Businessman and liberal billionaire donor Tom Steyer has released several ads attacking Republicans for taking money from the Koch brothers. (Associated Press)

STVERAK: Selling out on climate change

Billionaire mega-donor Tom Steyer is hedging his bets. Recently, Mr. Steyer backed out of a keynote speaker slot at the SXSW Eco conference.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Handsome Man's De Luxe Cafe'

In this treat of a book there are talking shoes advising their wearer on what not to eat and there is the boundless philosophizing of Mma Precious Ramotswe, owner of the No. 1 Ladies Detective Agency of Botswana.

Illustration on income inequality by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

FEIN: In praise of income inequality

Simple justice dictates that economic prosperity turn on individual skill, foresight, industry and risk-taking — traits which vary across the broad spectrum of the human species like a bell-shaped curve.

This undated image released by Bronner's Christmas Wonderland shows a Halloween-themed tree displayed at Bronner's Christmas Wonderland, a large Christmas store in Frankenmuth, Mich. So-called holiday creep, where the traditions one special occasion are embraced by another, now extends to Halloween. (AP Photo/Bronner's Christmas Wonderland)

EDITORIAL: Decking the halls with regulation

The Christmas season brings no joy to a bureaucrat. There's no heart for good will to appeal to. Banning things is what sets hearts afire in the Obama administration. The president most recently chased away the humble light bulb, the work of Thomas Edison a century ago, and replaced it with a pale substitute laced with deadly mercury. Only green fanatics were pleased.

The deadly virus in the electorate

- The Washington Times

Sometimes incompetence gets its due reward. No one has to accuse Barack Obama of spreading the Ebola virus. The incompetence of this administration is there for everyone to see, and suffer. "Leading from behind" works no better against a deadly virus than it has against evil in the Middle East and greedy ambition in Ukraine.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Bush exonerated, media silent

I must be living in an episode of "The Twilight Zone." On Oct. 15 the New York Times — the outlet to which all other publications seem to look for their leftist directives — put forth a front-page bombshell: More than 5,000 chemical weapons were indeed found in Iraq. This is the 'worse than Watergate' story of the last decade, yet ABC, NBC, CBS and CNN aren't even mentioning it.

March for Life vs. Obamacare Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

MONAHAN: Obamacare, or abortion care?

For almost 41 years, my organization has hosted a rally and march on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Perhaps you have seen us — as the largest pro-life gathering in the world.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Infatuated with nothing

At a recent fundraiser for President Obama, actress Gwyneth Paltrow introduced the president by blurting out, "You're so handsome that I can't speak properly." Coincidentally Mr. Obama has the same problem whenever he sees his own reflection in a teleprompter.

Illustration on how mishandling of the ebola crisis will giveDemocrats political troubles by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

LAMBRO: Bad news from the 'fear gauge'

Eighteen days before the midterm elections, President Obama and the Democrats face an outraged electorate that is whipping up a perfect political storm.

Maryland Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan speaks during his first gubernatorial debate with Democratic candidate, Lt. Gov. Anthony Brown, in Baltimore, Tuesday, Oct. 7, 2014. (AP Photo/The Baltimore Sun, Amy Davis, Pool)

EDITORIAL: Hogan for governor

Democrats stand at the edge of panic. The miserable economy, a president who retreats from challenge to lead from behind and the failure of the federal government to deal responsibly with the Ebola crisis all undermine faith in the party of more and bigger government. In a state that runs deep blue, a Republican has a shot at taking the Maryland governor's mansion.