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Obama Legacy: Ex-patriots Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How expatriates are forging an Obama legacy

The State Department recently announced that a record number of Americans in 2014 gave up their citizenship and decided to live elsewhere. Last year’s figure of 3,415 was a 14 percent increase over the previous record, 2,999, in 2013.

Illustration on the National Zoo pandas by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What the ‘Save the Pandas’ campaign reveals

For years, the National Zoo has come under fire, including in a blistering 2013 Congressional report over gross negligence, a scathing 2004 National Academy of Sciences report into animal deaths at the zoo and, somewhere in between, an investigation revealing that the zoo had disposed of some wild animals by sending them to a canned hunting outfit and to a petting zoo.

Laws Protecting Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When comprehensive legislation is counterproductive

The announcement by the House Republican leadership that the Innovation Act (H.R. 9) will not be scheduled for a vote this summer has the bill’s supporters concerned but not yet alarmed.

Illustration on the one percent and the American dream by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The American Dream lives

The American Dream couldn’t be more alive but there are those promoting class warfare who are certainly trying to kill it off. A recent Gallup poll (May 2015) shows that 63 percent of those polled feel that wealth and money should be more evenly distributed in America.

Caitlyn Jenner on the cover of Vanity Fair    Associated Press photo

New pronouns for the traveling freak show

- The Washington Times

Caitlyn Jenner, taking pride in his or her decolletage with a smart new frock for his famous Vanity Fair photo shoot, started the madness of the summer of ‘15, but he’s got nothing on the educationist establishment. They’re nothing but boobs (and proud of it).

Mount McKinley Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

McKinley, a mountain moniker no more

William McKinley doesn’t get the respect he deserves. The nation’s 25th president presided over a powerful pivot point in American history.

Pulling the Plug on the EPA Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

EPA’s clean power fraud

The Environmental Protection Agency has twisted 280 words in the Clean Air Act into 2,690 pages of Clean Power Plan regulations and appendices.

Chart to accompany Moore article of Aug. 31, 2015

Oil, America’s inexhaustible resource

In August 1859 on the eve of the Civil War, Col. Edwin Laurentine Drake completed the first commercial oil well in the United States on Oil Creek just outside of Titusville, Pa.

Obump Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A Republican version of Obama

Americans may finally be tiring of “talking-point presidents.” For more than six-and-a-half years, this is what President Obama has been — telling Americans what they want to hear, while pursuing policies they do not support.

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Typhoon Bopha is shown moving toward the Philippines in an Earth Observatory image from Monday, Dec. 3, 2012. (AP Photo/U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Jesse Allen)

A degree of uncertainty

Everybody knows July is hot, unless he lives somewhere below the equator, where the seasons are upside down. Government scientists say this past month was the hottest July ever.

The Flying Tigers in China, 1942 (Associated Press)

Recalling the heroics of the Flying Tigers

During the dark days of World War II, American pilots provided hope, grit, military support and brotherhood to the Chinese people battling the scourge of an overwhelming, often brutal invasion.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Midnight's Furies'

Sixty-eight years ago this August, India finally realized what its founding father Jawaharlal Nehru elegantly phrased its "tryst with destiny" and finally cast off British rule.

Illustration on the African political consequences U.S. legitimization of Iran through the Obama nuclear arms deal by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An African angle to the Iran nuclear deal

Most criticism of the U.S. administration's negotiation with Iran over its nuclear program points out a long list of relevant issues not addressed in the deal itself.

Bees on the Chalkboard Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A liberal dose of propaganda

Like a swarm of bees, back-to-school advertisements sting vacationing kids with the reminder that the first day of school is around the corner.

Illustration on a remedy for rising food stamp use by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

An unhealthy dependence on food stamps

Good news: The number of Americans using food stamps in 2014 declined slightly from the previous year. So why does the 2015 Index of Culture and Opportunity say this indicator is headed in the "wrong direction"?

Jimmy Carter     Associated Press photo

Jimmy Carter's peace

When Ronald Reagan announced in November 1994 he had been diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, even some of his most ardent political opponents paused to wish him well.

Vice President Joe Biden. (Associated Press)

Now the real fun is about to begin

- The Washington Times

This may be the most entertaining road show yet. Round and round the presidential campaign goes, and where it stops nobody knows. Even Mitt Romney is said to be thinking about jumping in again, no doubt figuring that some of Jeb's "investors," who are familiar indeed, may be looking for another place to place their bets.

Plentiful Wi-Fi Availability Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Easing the Wi-Fi spectrum crunch

The U.S. Small Business Administration and Census Bureau reports that there are more than 28 million small businesses that create over 90 percent of all new jobs in the nation.

'Welfare' abuse extends further up

Both "Boot camp, not benefits" and "When welfare beats work" (Web, Aug. 19) make good points: Welfare for the poor is expensive and too comfortable and it fosters mutual political dependence between recipients and government -- and of course, we need to do something about the whole thing.

This undated photo made available by Iberdrola Renewables LLC shows wind turbines on a corn and soybean farm in Trimont, Minn. The company will be building a similar commercial-scale wind energy farm near the coast community of Elizabeth City, N.C. (Iberdrola Renewables LLC via AP)

Obama's new clean energy giveaway

If Ronald Reagan were alive today, he would have turned to whoever was with him as President Obama finished his latest speech on climate change and "clean" energy and said, "Well, there he goes again."

End for Hillary?

Many of us on the far-right end of the dial have taken up chortling and raucous merriment in response to Hillary Clinton's plunging poll numbers, rising disapproval ratings and generally dismal summer ("Donald Trump gains ground as support for Hillary Clinton slips," Web, Aug. 19).

Do Americans still agree with "Give me your tired, your poor, your huddled masses," as engraved on the Statue of Liberty? (National park Service)

Anchor babies and an adult dilemma

There's nothing new about anchor babies. Only the nomenclature has changed. With hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens pouring across the border over the past decades, many of them are looking for an anchor to keep them in place in the new world. A 6-pound baby might do it.

The Whig's 1836 Candidates Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Will 2016 reprise 1836?

With a crowd of candidates vying for the Republican presidential nomination in 2016, it brings to mind the election of 1836.

Advertising outreach for a new ammunition line meant to down invasive lightweight drones. (Snake River Shooting Products)

'Prepare for Drone Apocalypse': New ammo meant to protect privacy-- and down drones

- The Washington Times

Now ready for citizens concerned their privacy is at stake in an increasing drone-friendly culture: Snake River Shooting Products has just introduced Drone Munition shot shell based defense rounds. "Prepare for the Drone Apocalypse, the Idaho-based company warns in its first ad for the new product, which they describe as a "12 gauge 3-inch shot shell solution aimed at defending against drone-based privacy concerns and terror."