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President Trump listens as Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi speaks during a meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. In an eventful week of politics, Mr. Trump will need to restore his credibility so he can handle the next crisis, says Matt Mackowiak. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

President Trump will need to rebuild his credibility for the next crisis

While President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee held up superbly under long days of confirmation hearings questioning, and the administration and the House GOP leadership furiously worked to assemble votes for the Obamacare replacement bill, the scene at Monday’s House Intelligence Committee hearing verged on the truly incredible.

Illustration on the Class of '21 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Class of ‘21, in hot pursuit of their Brave New World

The college Class of ‘21 is racing with caught breath and trembling fingers to check their email, pick up their snail mail, and steel themselves to read those college acceptance and rejection letters. Many schools have already dispatched congrats and regrets to thousands of applicants, and the Ivies still have a week to go before they put their letters in the mail.

Illegal Voter Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

From Free State to sanctuary state

- The Washington Times

Maryland is quite a place. The state’s voters elected a Republican governor in 2014, but control remains in the hands of the same “progressives” who enjoy veto-proof majorities in both houses of the legislature on most issues. They vote as if former Gov. and presidential wannabe Martin O’Malley is still ruling the roost in Annapolis.

Henry Sanchez, 18, is one of the students charged with rape. (Associated Press)

Maryland’s ‘safe’ environment

A rough translation of Maryland’s state motto is “Strong Deeds, Gentle Words.” In the case of a 14-year-old girl who was recently raped and sodomized in a restroom at Rockville High School by two males students, both immigrants, one facing a deportation hearing, that motto in practice has been reversed.

Illustration on the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

When politicians judge jurists

I have spent this past week watching the Senate Judiciary Committee interrogating U.S. Circuit Judge Neil Gorsuch. Judge Gorsuch is President Trump’s nominee to fill the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Military Buildup House of Cards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dangers of loose talk about winning wars

On several occasions, President Trump has exclaimed that America would start “winning” its wars again. Although these seemingly sensible announcements had a pleasing resonance among the many, it overlooked the obligations of serious strategic analysis.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Democrats’ blinkered look at Gorsuch

There was a remarkable exchange between Sen. Dianne Feinstein, ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s nominee to replace Justice Scalia on the Supreme Court, during Tuesday’s confirmation hearing.

Illustration on Kim's North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s pivot to North Korea

America can do anything but America can’t do everything, at least not within a four-year time frame. That suggests that the American president — any American president — needs to prioritize.

Illustration of Chuck Brunie by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chuck Brunie, an investor exemplar

What are more important to the health of an intellectual movement, writers and academics or investors and philanthropists? That thought occurred to me when I was informed of the death of Chuck Brunie, the former longtime chairman of the board of the Manhattan Institute and the chairman emeritus of The American Spectator.

Illustration on the sixty vote threshold rule in the Senate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The pernicious no-debate filibuster

As habitually practiced since only the mid-1990s, by doing absolutely nothing, with almost no accountability accruing to them (using the “no-debate stealth filibuster”), the minority in the U.S. Senate can easily — and nearly always — either stop every legislative effort from even coming to the floor, or far more insidiously, sabotage it.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer speaks to the media during the daily press briefing at the White House, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Washington. Spicer discussed healthcare, immigration, and other topics. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Fake legal standing

The Hawaii federal court’s recent nationwide block of President Trump’s new executive order on immigration is troubling. The court’s decision turns on its head the important requirement that persons have legitimate “standing” to invoke the power of the federal courts.

Unanswered Questions in the Mideast Conflicts Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A slippery slope in Iraq and Syria

The good news is various forces are attacking ISIS (the Islamic State) and its control of territory is weakening. But as it does, historical adversaries are converging on the battlefield and American troops are standing between them in ever-increasing numbers. What began as limited airstrikes has become an American ground presence. Changes begun in the previous administration continue in the current one.

Energy Industry Red Tape Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Declaring energy independence

The United States is about to reach a major energy milestone. A new government report predicts that the nation is on track to become a net energy exporter within the decade.

President Donald Trump speaks at the National Republican Congressional Committee March Dinner at the National Building Museum, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) ** FILE **

The Trump budget and Big Bird

The liberal fainting couch continues to get a workout. Since President Trump announced his budget last week, the poor liberal base has been pummeled with hysterical headlines announcing Mr. Trump’s desire to destroy the Meals on Wheels program. Once he’s done with that, he’ll murder Big Bird. And then after that, the evil and depraved genius has figured out how to completely eradicate all the “arts” in America.

Related Articles

This undated image provided by the U.S. Marine Corps shows a billboard that the Corps will post as part of a new recruitment advertisement campaign, meant to draw millennials by showing Marines as not only strong warriors but good citizens. "Battles Won" is the name of the campaign that includes TV ads and online clips of Marines unloading "Toys for Tots" boxes and real video of a Marine veteran tackling an armed robber. The military's smallest branch is also considering replacing its iconic slogan, "The Few. The Proud. The Marines." (U.S. Marine Corps via AP)

Marines, sadly, go soft for snowflakes

- The Washington Times

Marines, long regarded the tough guy fighting force of the United States -- the branch above politically correct reproach, the one able to withstand the progressive onslaughts that have permeated America's military in recent years -- have a new, tailor-made message for millennials. And it's a bit on the softy side.

In this Jan. 5, 2017, photo, a painting by David Pulphus hangs in a hallway displaying paintings by high school students selected by their member of congress on Capitol Hill in Washington. A GOP congressman reported Jan. 13 that a painting stirring controversy on Capitol Hill will be taken down on Tuesday as a result of a review by the agency responsible for maintaining the Capitol complex determined it violated rules for a student arts competition. The painting depicts Ferguson, Missouri, with the image of a pig in a police uniform aiming a gun at a protester. The painting was among hundreds completed by high school students that are featured in a tunnel leading to the Capitol. (AP Photo/Zach Gibson)

Anti-police 'pig' art must go -- and stay gone

- The Washington Times

A federal judge is poised to issue a ruling any day now about the fate of a controversial piece of art in the U.S. Capitol that shows a policeman as a pig -- and the fact that this even has to go to court shows not just the power, but the utter ridiculousness, of the progressive movement in America, circa 2017. Congress should not be in the business of promoting the idea that police are pigs.

Sen. Rand Paul, R-Ky., a vociferous opponent of the House Republican healthcare reform plan, referring to it as "Obamacare light," discusses the bill before a TV interview on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March, 15, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Civil asset forfeiture reform rears again -- thank goodness

- The Washington Times

Sen. Rand Paul and Rep. Tim Walberg, both Republicans, have re-introduced one of the most important pieces of legislation to come forward in decades that will secure the rights of Americans to be safe in their possessions and properties -- a rollback to civil asset forfeiture laws. Speedy passage is needed.

From left, Marina Aleixo tends to the children's table as Diana Otongo, Umar Choudry and Jonas Mphiri serve themselves a meal of rice, salmon and beef stroganoff inside Aleixo and Choudry's Minneapolis home on March 5, 2017. Immigrants themselves, Aleixo and Choudry are inviting immigrant and refugee families to dinner at their home more frequently. "These kind of initiatives can help us gain a better understanding of each other," Aleixo said.   (Evan Frost/Minnesota Public Radio via AP)

Gag me with the media spin on falling food stamps

- The Washington Times

And leftists say there's no such thing as a left-leaning media -- that media bias is all in conservatives' heads. Well, look at this headline, from The Washington Post, about the drop in numbers of illegals applying for food stamp benefits: "Immigrants are going hungry so Trump won't deport them."

Big Bird arrives at the Daytime Emmy Awards in Los Angeles, in this Aug. 30, 2009, file photo. (AP Photo/Matt Sayles, File)

The Budget Theater, now open with the follies

- The Washington Times

A president's budget has the shelf life of a shrimp. A president drafts a budget and sells it with language as chaste and extravagant as the blue sky, and his naysayers dutifully mount their soap boxes to declaim, distort and denounce.

Trump Claims of Eavesdropping of His Campaign Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Tweets and trials

Two of the government's highest ranking intelligence officials will go before a House committee next week to testify about President Trump's bombastic claim that his predecessor "tapped" his phones during the 2016 election.

Brazilian transgender model Valentina Sampaio wears a creation from the Amir Slama collection during Sao Paulo Fashion Week in Sao Paulo, Brazil, Thursday, March 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andre Penner)

Transgendered child abuse

- The Washington Times

Last year, NBC News did a two-part series dubbed "transgender kids," that featured "the stories of 5-year-old Jacob Lemay and 8-year-old Malisa Phillips, two children transitioning to live as their authentic selves."

Imagining the very human sufferings of a queen

As a person, Queen Anne (1765-1714) is generally accounted the least impressive of the all the female monarchs who have ruled England. Which is not to say that her reign did not see great victories and many consequential events: it's just that she was more a presider over them rather than being as much of an activist as her predecessors or Queen Victoria.

President Donald Trump arrives for a St. Patrick's Day reception in the East Room of the White House in Washington, Thursday, March 16, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Mr. Trump's travel ban

President Trump and the lower federal courts are playing a dangerous game of ping-pong, and the nation's security is paying for it. The president, who is responsible for the nation's safety, proposes and certain federal judges, who have no such responsibility dispose. The president proposes again, and again a judge or two dispose.

Sugar tax won't make us healthier

It looks like a food fight in Philadelphia ("When a sugar tax goes sour," Web, March 7). The way to deal with sugar is for the federal government to come clean, and there is no way that is going to happen. Sugar consumption is just the inevitable result of decades of vilifying healthy fats and creating, subsidizing and selling a food supply that is based on three grains plus sugar deep-fried in vegetable oil. And if you ask your doctor about this and how it relates to your health, be prepared for a shock. Your doctor is trained not to have a clue.

Issa Hayatou, right, speaks to FIFA President Gianni Infantino, left, at the opening of the general assembly of the Confederation of African Football (CAF) in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia Thursday, March 16, 2017. Issa Hayatou was voted out as president of the African soccer confederation on Thursday after 29 years in charge, losing to challenger Ahmad of Madagascar in a major shakeup for the sport on the continent. (AP Photo)

The hateful idea of hate crime

Three men were indicted this month in Washington for the fatal shooting of a 22-year-old transgendered woman, the robbing of a second transgendered woman and the assault on a third. A "hate crime" charge was added to the charges of conspiracy, robbery and first-degree murder, which could mean that the defendants, if convicted, could serve sentences half again as long as for "mere" murder.

School children, wrapped in blankets, wait nearby their high school in Grasse, southern France, after a 16-year-old student opened fire, wounding two other students and the principal trying to intervene, Thursday, March 16, 2017. French Education Minister Najat Vallaud-Belkacem says the shooting in a high school appears to be the "insane act of a fragile young man fascinated by weapons." (AP Photo/Philippe Farjon)

Strong families key to fighting the growing menace of human trafficking

This week I had the great honor to speak at the United Nations on the issue of human trafficking, invited by the Center for Family and Human Rights (C-Fam). The discussion focused on the root causes of trafficking and the key role of the family in preventing this growing and disturbing trend of modern slavery. Human trafficking knows no boundaries and affects the lives of women and children around the globe.

President Donald Trump speaks at a rally Wednesday, March 15, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Mark Humphrey)

What, now Trump's to be taken seriously? How convenient

- The Washington Times

Here's a question that's floating in the winds of judicial clamp-down on President Donald Trump's latest travel ban: Since when did anybody on the left, to include activist judges, consider Trump and his blunt style of speaking anything but clownish in the first place?