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Bill O'Reilly (Associated Press)

The high price of Fox hunting

- The Washington Times

The famous bimbo eruptions are back (as if they had ever really gone away), and for once Bubba appears to be in the clear. No new accusations of rude behavior have been lodged against him.

Illustration on a poll-driven view of America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Misleading polls and fake news

Newscasts continue to be filled with references to polling numbers that suggest President Trump and his policies are deeply unpopular, and that the American people overwhelmingly oppose the actions taken by America’s 45th president during his first 100 days in office.

The Non-biodegradable Plastic Bottle Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How an overreaching FTC attacks the environment

The proliferation of plastic on land and in our oceans — plastic that can take hundreds of years to biodegrade — is among the most serious environmental issues in the world. As a consumer, wouldn’t you want to know about a plastic bottle that biodegraded in significantly less time?

Illustration on Trump's first 100 days by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

The president’s ongoing challenges

The Trump administration is still in the throes of getting its foreign policy act together, expressing conflicting messages on Russia, Syria and other troubles abroad as it nears the 100th day of his presidency.

Theresa May (The Washington Times illustration)

With unexpected crackle and snap, Theresa May becomes Theresa Will

Prime Minister Theresa May is giving herself a new identity. Suddenly she’s no longer “Theresa Maybe,” showing her mettle by moving toward Margaret Thatcher’s politics of the bold and unexpected. She still has a way to go to transform that mettle into the steel of the Iron Lady, but she may be on her way.

North Korean school girls react upon seeing their photograph being taken as they walk along Mirae Scientists Street on Wednesday, April 19, 2017, in Pyongyang, North Korea. Tensions have spiked in recent weeks over North Korea's advancing nuclear technology and missile arsenal. But in Pyongyang, where war would mean untold horrors, few people seem to care much at all. (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

What next with North Korea?

There was a moment at Press Secretary Sean Spicer’s White House briefing Monday that was significant. Asked by a reporter about North Korea’s missile launch last weekend, Mr. Spicer said the administration was aware of the launch and that “it failed.” End of story. Next question, please.

A woman collecting money for charity stands next to a quote written on an information board at Tower Hill underground train station, written in defiance of the previous day's attack in London, Thursday, in this March 23, 2017, file photo. On Wednesday, a man went on a deadly rampage, first driving a car into pedestrians then stabbing a police officer to death before being fatally shot by police within Parliament's grounds in London. (AP Photo/Matt Dunham) ** FILE **

Charity keeps America free

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump’s senior advisers, deep in the weeds of tax reform, are reportedly looking at ways to save the middle class by placing more financial responsibilities on the shoulders of the wealthy — and part of the plan being discussed is to limit the level of deductions charitable organizations can take. This is the wrong way to go.

Emergence of Redneck Porn Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Redneck porn

The 20th century gave us a good many new literary genres. Modernism, Futurism, Dadaism. Later on there was Post-modernism, Structuralism, Deconstruction. And now there’s a new literary genre: Redneck Porn.

Illustration on progressivism and government by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Apocalyptic liberalism

Shortly after the 2008 election, President Obama’s soon-to-be chief of staff, Rahm Emanuel, infamously declared, “You never let a serious crisis go to waste.”

Illustration on the March for Science by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Goose stepping for science

Imagine yourself in Moscow in 1950, taking part in a March for Science. Science in the Soviet Union had been suffering for many years under Trofim Lysenko, a third-rate biologist who promoted unsound agricultural policies.

Illustration on the Syrian conundrum by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

A sober look at the confusion in Assad’s Syria

Was “Tomahawking” Syria for an alleged gas attack justifiable retribution, misfeasance, malfeasance or just a mistake? Was it a warning to China and North Korea as some have advanced? (This is the same line of thinking that bombing Hiroshima and Nagasaki was really aimed cautioning the Soviet Union.) Why would China, the “celestial kingdom,” powerful in her own right, pay attention; why would North Korea, in the hands of a madman, even care?

Fox News host Tucker Carlson interviews Drexel University professor George Ciccariello on March 30, 2017. (Fox News screenshot)

The rot of political correctness

In today’s academy, truth is an invention. Expecting people to show up on time is racist. Censorship is good. Silencing opposing viewpoints imperative. Violence to enforce safety is natural.

Illustration on Erdogan's impact on Turkey by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The end of Turkey’s democratic experiment

On the grounds of the Turkish Embassy facing Massachusetts Ave. in Washington, D.C. is a statue of Mustafa Kamal Ataturk, father of the Republic of Turkey, the nation-state he built from the rubble of the defeated Ottoman Empire and Islamic caliphate.

Illustration on the proposed Eisenhower Memorial by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Saving the Eisenhower Memorial

There is hope. I am speaking of the envisioned memorial to Dwight D. Eisenhower here in Washington, D.C. Admittedly, its design by the crank architect Frank Gehry has been pretty much accepted by the Dwight D. Eisenhower Memorial Commission, and the chairman of the House committee that has control of the funding, Rep. Ken Calvert, seems to be going along.

Related Articles

U.S. Vice President Mike Pence arrives with U.S. Gen. Vincent Brooks, second from right, commander of the United Nations Command, U.S. Forces Korea and Combined Forces Command, and South Korean Deputy Commander of the Combined Force Command Gen. Leem Ho-young, left, at the border village of Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ) which has separated the two Koreas since the Korean War, South Korea, Monday, April 17, 2017. Viewing his adversaries in the distance, Pence traveled to the tense zone dividing North and South Korea and warned Pyongyang that after years of testing the U.S. and South Korea with its nuclear ambitions, "the era of strategic patience is over." (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Wakey-wakey, North Korea, this White House means business

- The Washington Times

Vice President Mike Pence sent a strong message North Korea's way Monday, telling the regime the "era of strategic patience is over," a reference to the former Barack Obama's foreign policy preference of dealing with Pyongyang's aggressions by turning a blind eye and pretending all was A-OK. This is a good time to be an American.

Diminished Air Power Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

There's a crisis in the air

American armed forces consistently perform so well that their effectiveness is taken for granted. Complaints about military spending cuts during the Obama years are such a cliche that they have been yawned at by our political leaders and completely ignored by the media.

Illustration on options and repurcussions in dealing with Russia by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward a U.S.-Russia summit

Russia is a declining economic power that plays an outsized role in world affairs owing to its nuclear arsenal and aggressive behavior. Russia remains resentful over the Soviet Union's collapse and NATO's expansion to its borders.

Illustration on Federal conservation efforts in Maine by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

A monumental issue in Maine

Buried until recently under several feet of late season snow, communities in mid- and northern Maine are seeing grass again after temperatures soared into the 70s for a couple of days and then had highs remaining in the 50s.

Trump's Coal Comeback Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

King Coal's big comeback

Buried in an otherwise humdrum jobs report for March was the jaw-dropping pronouncement by the Labor Department that mining jobs in America were up by 11,000 in March. Since the low point in October 2016 and following years of painful layoffs in the mining industry, the mining sector has added 35,000 jobs.

Juan Francisco Lopez-Sanchez, right, is led into the courtroom by San Francisco Public Defender Jeff Adachi, left, and Assistant District Attorney Diana Garciaor, center, for his arraignment at the Hall of Justice in San Francisco in this July 7, 2015, file photo. The parents of Kathryn Steinle filed a wrongful death claim Tuesday, Sept. 1, 2015, alleging that the San Francisco Sheriff's Department is to blame for releasing an illegal immigrant from jail despite a federal "detainer" request to keep in custody for possible deportation proceedings. A claim is usually a precursor to a lawsuit. (Michael Macor/San Francisco Chronicle via AP, Pool, File)

No sanctuary from murder in Denver

The smiling visage of Kathryn Steinle, tragically murdered while standing beside her father on a San Francisco pier, is well-known. Known nationally as well is that the illegal alien who shot her was a criminal with a long rap sheet, who had traveled illegally to the United States on multiple occasions, and had been arrested and repatriated to Mexico only to return to America to resume his criminal activity, including on that tragic day when he stole an unguarded weapon from a Bureau of Land Management agent and shot Ms. Steinle.

Words on life from a writer and true gourmand

Jim Harrison and red wine started going together when he was a teenager and they never broke up. The 79-year-old poet, essayist, screenwriter, and novel- and novella-writing man of letters was a lifelong drinker of red wine, the quality of which was directly related to his current income.

Rice cover-ups go much deeper

Pardon those who did not take Susan Rice at her word when she recently went before MSNBC TV cameras and "categorically denied committing any wrongdoing by seeking the redacted names of Trump campaign aides" in her latest political dust-up ("Unmasking' of Trump aides reveals Susan Rice at center of multifarious controversies," Web, April 12). Lost in earlier Beltway sparring over Rice's role in the Obama administration's response to the Benghazi attacks were the hard facts of the timeline for those events.

Improve high-speed rail

With the recent controversy over United Airlines violently pulling a seated passenger off a flight, it is good to reflect on air travel in general. Passengers are expected to arrive at the terminal two hours before their scheduled flights, then endure security lines, which entail removing shoes and being patted down.

Spicer Hitler comments unacceptable

Press Secretary Sean Spicer's recent comments during Passover regarding Adolf Hitler, Syrian leader Bashar Assad and poison gas were totally insensitive and inexcusable ("Sean Spicer: I 'let the president down' with Hitler-Assad comments," Web, April 12).

Muslim leaders must seek change

If the recent attempt by Islamists to kill Coptic Pope Tawadros II does not finally open the eyes of the world to the fact that Islam is not a religion but an ideology seeking total domination, then we are blind ("Suicide bombers kill 44 at Palm Sunday services in Egypt," Web, April 9).

President Donald Trump, accompanied by first lady Melania Trump waves to onlookers as he enters Episcopal Church of Bethesda-by-the-Sea in Palm Beach, Fla., for an Easter Service, Sunday, April 16, 2017. (Joe Cavaretta/South Florida Sun-Sentinel via AP)

The war for Trump's ear

There's an ominous rumble of war in Korea, there's always an ominous rumble of war in the Middle East, but in Washington we've already got the real thing. The combatants are taking no prisoners and the rules of the Geneva Convention do not apply.

Ohio State kicker Sean Nuernberger plays in their NCAA college spring football game Saturday, April 15, 2017, in Columbus, Ohio. (AP Photo/Jay LaPrete)

Guns are big, but football's bigger

Guns are big in Arkansas, but hogs and football can be bigger. The National Rifle Association took on the Razorbacks of the University of Arkansas over a law that would have enabled fans to take their guns to the game, and the Razorbacks won.

A hooded penitent from "Cristo de los Angeles" brotherhood holds a cross inside the "Gaitanas" church before taking part in a traditional annual Holy Week procession in Toledo, Spain, Tuesday, April 11, 2017. Hundreds of processions take place throughout Spain during the Easter Holy Week. (AP Photo/Francisco Seco)

Why America needs God

- The Washington Times

Atheists and progressives will tell you America is a secular nation, built on secular principles, and that it's the job of the rising generations to make sure politics and religion never do meet. They are wrong.

Han Song Ryol, North Korea's vice foreign minister, listens to a translator during an interview with The Associated Press on Friday, April 14, 2017, in Pyongyang, North Korea. Han Song Ryol said the situation on the Korean Peninsula is now in a "vicious cycle." (AP Photo/Wong Maye-E)

John Bolton hits it on head with North Korea

- The Washington Times

Former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations John Bolton offered up a pretty blunt assessment of the North Korea thang that went like this: Want to get rid of the nuke threat from that regime? Then take out the regime.

Ruth Bader Ginsberg (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Donald Trump and his flexible mind

- The Washington Times

If chaos is the sign of growth -- and sometimes that's a fair description of progress -- Donald Trump is on course to build an administration that can survive the fits, starts and mistakes of a drawn-out opening night.

Illustration on the work of Fred Kelly Grant by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Unsung hero of rural America

While President Trump and Congress tackle federal regulations and the agencies that promulgate them, Fred Kelly Grant is quietly doing the same -- and succeeding -- with the most powerful weapon you've likely never heard of.