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Illustration on the decline of the FBI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why the FBI is hard to trust

- The Washington Times

Can anyone with a modicum of common sense trust the Federal Bureau of investigation? The answer to that question is a resounding “no.” The claim that the FBI strives to be above politics is today and has always been absurd.

ACLU Legal and Policy director Rebecca Robertson talks during a news conference held by opponents of a "bathroom bill" at the Texas State Capitol, Wednesday, April 19, 2017, in Austin, Texas. The Texas House is considering a bill that's different than one that sparked outcry when it cleared the state Senate last month. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

The ACLU goes hunting in Montana

In a 1981 speech before the California Peace Officers Assn., former Attorney General Ed Meese referred to the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) as a “criminals’ lobby.”

Illustration on the need to deplot THAAD by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The folly of putting protection on ice

North Korea rarely misses an opportunity to threaten or provoke us. It does so most often with the launching of one or more ballistic missiles accompanied by a harangue that the missiles would soon be launched at us armed with nuclear weapons.

Illustration on the real situation of Cuba by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why the new Cuba policy misses the mark

President Donald Trump announced his Cuba policy in Miami last week. I commend him for many of his efforts. He unveiled a replacement policy for the disastrous Cuba policy President Obama put into place. The highlight of Mr. Obama’s policy was lifting an economic embargo that was placed after the Communist revolution of Fidel Castro brought the world to the brink of nuclear war with the Missile Crisis in 1962.

The Illinois Shop of Horrors Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Banana Republic of Illinois

The media has hyper-obsessed over the Kansas tax hike this year and has sold this as a repudiation of “supply side economics.” But the real story in the states has been the catastrophic effects of “tax and spend” fiscal policy in Illinois.

George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The party’s over and no place to call home

- The Washington Times

That’s the dilemma of the Democrats, forlorn, despondent and walking in circles like the goose hit on the head with a long-handled wooden spoon. They’re asking questions for which there are no happy answers in the wake of their fourth straight loss in a round of special elections.

Illustration of Anne Morgan by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Anne Morgan, an American Hero

The United States was finally in “the war to end all wars.” France had been ravaged since the summer of 1914. Villages and towns were obliterated. Women and children went hungry and homeless as the armies wrestled in futile combat in mud, blood and indescribable filth and disease. The British lost 20,000 dead in a single day at the Battle of the Somme.

Illustration on the decline of medical care quality by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Supporting medicine and its finest practitioners

Treating emergencies isn’t your insurance talking. It’s doctoring. It’s nursing. It’s medical technology. It’s your stone-filled gallbladder obstructing and a top surgeon operating on it without delay. You can’t prove that a junior attending surgeon wouldn’t do just as well, but you can feel it when the wound is healing so well two days later where the angry raw organ was scope-sucked successfully from your body.

Illustration on the devaluation of U.S. bonds by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Uncle Sam’s F-rated bonds

Were the United States any other country, its bonds would have long ago been downgraded to junk.

Speaker of the House Paul Ryan of Wis., speaks to reporters during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, June 22, 2017. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

Paul Ryan is afraid to lead

- The Washington Times

The thing people like about House Speaker Paul D. Ryan is that he is a serious guy who is capable of thinking big and has an ambitious agenda to salvage our ungovernable federal bureaucracy.

Photojournalist Shay Horse said he was pepper-sprayed while covering protests at the Jan. 21 presidential inauguration, even though his camera identified him as a journalist. (Sarah Nelson / The Washington Times)

Is ACLU lawsuit against D.C. cops a red herring?

- The Washington Times

“An officer told us to drop our pants,” Shay Horse said. “An officer went down the row telling each of us not to flinch as he grabbed our balls and yanked on them, and then stuck his finger up each of our anuses and wiggled it around. I felt like they were using molestation and rape as punishment.”

Illustration on the cultural importance of Shakespeare and his play, 'Julius Caesar'              The Washington Times

Donald Trump Julius Caesar mockery reduces Shakespeare

Whether the famous dead Roman is a look-alike for Donald Trump, with a blond comb-over and a long red tie, a cool black dude in a tailored suit suggesting Barack Obama, or a 1930s Orson Welles with a Sam Browne belt resembling Benito Mussolini, the character has captured the imagination of public and players since Shakespeare wrote it more than four centuries ago.

Illustration on the fiscal plight of Puerto Rico by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

A sinking feeling in Puerto Rico

The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico is drowning. The island, so popular with tourists, is $123 billion in debt. That’s more debt than the $18 billion bankruptcy filed by the city of Detroit in 2013. In May, San Juan declared a form of bankruptcy after creditors filed lawsuits demanding their money. A federal district judge appointed by Chief Justice John Roberts will handle the case.

Illustration on german passivity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Beyond German pacifism

“The Germans are either at your feet or at your throat,” wrote the Roman historian Tacitus 2,000 years ago. Sadly, that axiom is not just ancient history. In the last century, Germany started two world wars, caused the death and suffering of tens of millions, and was responsible for the unspeakable horror of the Holocaust.

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Illustration on the faults of the NIEHS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chemical scaremongering

It's great news the Trump administration is starting to dismantle the junk science life-support system for government overregulation. Budget cuts at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and reforms of science advisory panels at the Department of Interior and EPA, stir hope the agencies' longstanding reigns of terror via "science" may come to an end.

FILE - In this Sept. 14, 2014, file photo, protesters participate in a rally on Chicago's south side as labor organizers escalate their campaign raise the minimum wage for employees to $15 an hour. Amid a national push by unions and worker advocates for a $15 minimum wage, Illinois Democrats hope to pass an ambitious hike during the spring legislative session, despite a warning from Republican Gov. Bruce Rauner that he opposes an increase of any kind. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)

Curtains for union coercion

In 1947 organized labor spent today's equivalent of $11 million opposing the Slave Labor Act. The act is better known today as Taft-Hartley. Despite the union's rant, it was designed to provide protection against abusive and often violent labor unions. Now on the 70th anniversary of that law, Congress is again poised to realign employment relationships free from coercive union pressures.

Illustration on the excessive costs of scientific research by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The high overhead of scientific research

Last year American taxpayers spent more than $42 billion for scientific research and education at universities and nonprofits across the country. Most of this investment contributed to American innovation, economic competitiveness and national security.

Illustration on elements of the American dream by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The American Dream, alive and well

Almost any time you see the phrase "the American Dream" these days, it seems to be in a negative context. The speaker is either assuring us that it's dead or that it can be salvaged only by a radical redefinition -- one that often contradicts the basic principles this country was founded on.

Illustration on the death of cash by Greg groesch/The Washington Times

Breaking the monopoly on money

If mankind can figure out how to give everyone instant communication and all the world's knowledge via the smartphone, why are we not smart enough to figure out equally convenient, quick, low-cost and secure ways of paying for goods and services to everyone on the planet? Actually, we are.

Illustration on protecting the Baltic nations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

NATO's Baltic challenge

President Trump was coy about his commitment to NATO's Article 5, which considers an attack on one member state is an attack on all. Most informed observers saw this as a bargaining ploy to get the attention of those member states who have not met the NATO defense spending target of 2 percent of gross domestic product (GDP).

How to liberate children from 'perpetual adolescence'

"I believe our entire nation is in the midst of a collective coming of age crisis without parallel in our history," writes Ben Sasse, junior senator from Nebraska and former president of Midland University.

Return to private-sector insurance

Obamacare, Ryancare, McConnellcare, etc., are all disasters for the quality and expense of medical care in America. The solution is returning 80 percent of Americans to private-sector insurance in a nationwide marketplace. As insurance companies compete for customers, we will see the choices multiply. Federal mandates will be eliminated and the states will be encouraged to eliminate mandates as well.

Congress wasting taxpayer money

As sad as it was, last week's deliberate shooting of members of the GOP probably surprised few people. The Republican Party in particular decries the failings of one federal agency and its employees after another. Yet almost every day the GOP and Democrats alike throw at each other the politics of immature obstruction, insults and finger-pointing. Either party passing a bill but not getting it to the president's desk is not success, it is legislative failure.

FILE - In this March 24, 2017, file photo, vials filled with samples of marijuana are arranged at the Blum medical marijuana dispensary, in Reno, Nev. Nevada's marijuana regulators are working furiously to launch recreational sales on July 1, a fast-approaching deadline that could hinge on a court deciding whether the powerful liquor industry should be guaranteed a piece of the pot pie before tourists and residents can light up. Lawyers for the liquor industry, marijuana retailers and the state are facing a judge Monday, June 19, 2017, to argue whether Nevada has the authority to issue marijuana distribution licenses to anyone besides alcohol distributors. (AP Photo/Scott Sonner, File)

Disappointment in Potlandia

Curing cancer and eliminating heart disease would be nice, but what the government -- federal, state and local -- would like most of all is a new source of revenue, i.e., something new to tax.

Cuban Foreign Minister Bruno Rodriguez Parilla addresses the media during a news conference in Vienna, Austria, Monday, June 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Ronald Zak)

Greater expectations for Cuba

There's more to life than pursuit of the dollar. It's not a message necessarily expected from a billionaire president, but in reversing his predecessor's Cuba policies, President Trump reminded the world that prosperity grows in the sunshine of freedom, and dwindles in the darkness where democracy dies.

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos attends a Cabinet meeting with President Donald Trump, Monday, June 12, 2017, in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

School choice for military families: Educational freedom for those who secure our freedom

Last month at a policy summit for the American Federation for Children, Education Secretary Betsy DeVos heralded the advent of "the most ambitious expansion of education choice in our nation's history." President Trump, she said, was committed to "empowering parents to make the best choices for their kids' education."

Illustration on the limited vision of politicized jurists on the question of nullification by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Sanctuaries, for goose and gander, too

Since the beginning of this century, officials in states and localities controlled by the Democratic Party have increasingly disregarded laws, referenda and court decisions that affront their "progressive" sensibilities. That amounts to nullification, and it's hard for the federal government to impose its will on them. But now the progressives are going to learn that two can play at that game.

Defunding ARPAe Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The little agency that does

Cleaner, more secure, more affordable energy has been a national goal since America's founding. Whalers braved storms for it in the 1800s. Diplomats sought to secure supply lines for it more recently. In the last few years, a little-known federal agency with a long, complicated name has found a better way to get us closer to this elusive goal. The Advanced Research Projects Agency — Energy (ARPA-E) does it by more effectively using the nation's most essential resource: ingenuity.

Illustration on vocational education for manufacture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

In praise of apprenticeship

- The Washington Times

My father was the president of the Rockford, Illinois Labor Council when I was a kid. He was a machinist at a time when Rockford and Cincinnati were the centers of the nation's machine tool industry. I remember that many of those working as machinists in Rockford back then were Hungarian refugees; skilled machinists who had fled after Soviet tanks had put down their attempt to topple their Communist government in 1956.

Illustration on Trump's potential impact on America's space program in the 21st century by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump, the new JFK in space

Bill Gates first noticed parallels between President John F. Kennedy and President-elect Donald Trump after speaking with the newly electd president: "But in the same way President Kennedy talked about the space mission and got the country behind that, there can be a very upbeat message that [Trump's] administration [is] going to organize things, get rid of regulatory barriers, and have American leadership through innovation."

Chart to accompany Moore article of June 19, 2017

Much fast growth right around the corner

Every day there are legions of new economists who dismiss the Donald Trump economic agenda and his forecast of 3 percent growth as a wild-eyed fantasy. The consensus is that the economy "can't possibly grow at 3 percent" says The Wall Street Journal. "Slow growth is the new norm, so get used to it," writes Rucir Sharma, Morgan Stanley, chief global strategist at Morgan Stanley in Foreign Affairs magazine this month.

Roman Bellis, 4, and his dad, Dana Bellis, Millersburg, Pa., wear "Best. Dad. Ever." and "Best. Kid. Ever." shirts at the 67th annual Father's Day Breakfast at Valley View Park in Valley View, Pa., Sunday, June 18, 2017. The breakfast is sponsored by the St. Andrew's United Methodist Church's men's Bible class. (Jacqueline Dormer/Republican-Herald via AP)

A fatherly manner

It's Father's Day, or the day after, depending on when you read this. Statistics about the decline of fatherhood are very sobering, but I'm not here to bring readers down or to make people feel bad if they did not have or don't have a happy family life.