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(Image courtesy of thestar.com).

Life’s a scream on the slippery slope

- The Washington Times

“The slippery slope” doesn’t frighten very many people in Washington because that’s where a lot of politicians live. Life can be comfortable there, and it’s usually quite profitable. But it’s a dangerous piece of real estate for the rest of us.

There’s good news about third-party candidates

The conventional wisdom is that an independent presidential bid by New York billionaire Donald Trump would harm the Republican candidate in 2016. That’s probably incorrect. Most often, significant independent general-election candidacies harm the incumbent or incumbent party more than they do the challenging party.

Illustration contrasting Reagan's dealings with the Soviets and Obama's with Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Barack Obama, you’re no Ronald Reagan’

In a recent interview defending the proposed nuclear agreement with Iran, President Obama argued that that his approach to Iran is essentially the same as that which Ronald Reagan took toward the Soviet Union. Mr. Obama said that ” where I completely admire him was his recognition that [an agreement would be worth doing] if you were able to verify an agreement that you would negotiate with the evil empire that was hell-bent on our destruction and was a far greater existential threat to us than Iran will ever be.”

Illustration on Obama's undermining of the U.S. military by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Undermining the military

When President Obama announced that he was going to “fundamentally transform” America, not many Americans understood the full depth of that statement. Based on an assessment of his policies over the last six and half years, clearly one of Mr. Obama’s objectives has been to diminish America’s standing and leadership role throughout the world. One result has been that our allies now don’t trust us and our enemies don’t fear us — the worst possible combination.

President Johnson signs Medicare legislation July 30, 1965.                Associated Press photo

Medicare at age 50

Diehard defenders of President Obama’s continuing, wretched rollout of the Affordable Care Act may be quick to point out that other government programs, most notably Medicare, also had rocky starts. But the historical record doesn’t support such nonsense.

Illustration on courtesy, respect and rules in the U.S. Senate by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When tough talk roils the decorum of the Senate

The United States Senate has a long and justly celebrated tradition of comity and respect among members. Although there have been occasional exceptions throughout history, on the whole, senators have taken great care to treat each other with courtesy and respect, both in private discussions and in public deliberations.

Peace Through Strength Bunker Bomb Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Reviving ‘peace through strength’

Ever since the Ayatollah Khomeini and his Islamist storm troops took over Iran in 1979, the driving force of the country’s rulers has been (1) destroy Israel; (2) establish Iran as the hegemonist of the Middle East; and (3) drive out all Western influences from the region. Their efforts to create a nuclear arsenal has been part of their strategy to accomplish these goals.

Illustration on the controversy stirred during the creation of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Surviving ‘a perfect storm’ of opposition

Just two months ago, the nation marked the 40th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, and many of the stories in the media were illustrated with images of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial on the Mall, which over the past three decades has become an American cultural icon — symbolizing that difficult period in our history. Yet, that memorial, as we know it today, almost didn’t happen.

Related Articles

Iran deal sacrifices Israel

Recently Secretary of State John Kerry issued a draconian proclamation in defense of the Iran deal. He warned that if Congress rejects the plan, "Our friends in this effort will desert us." The dreadful irony of this statement immediately arrested me.

Illustration on GOP's expanded campaigning on social media by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Cow bells, dog whistles and the Grand Old Party

The Republicans are desperately trying to get hip. Pursuing the latest new thing is not in the Republican DNA, but it's necessary to win elections. They have to tap into the popular culture of social media to woo the younger generation of voters, and that requires a digital strategy.

Waste and Mismanagement in Prince George's County Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When the problem isn't revenue but out-of-control spending

- The Washington Times

Maryland, like Illinois, is famous as an integrity-free zone. Former governors, the heads of various school systems in the state, legislators, county executives and law enforcement officials have ended their careers in federal and state penal institutions for confusing serving the public with serving themselves at the public's expense.

Illustration on the imperative need for Congress to reject the Obama/Iran nuclear arms deal by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Obama and Hillary bulldoze the promise of 'never again'

- The Washington Times

In the 70 years since the Holocaust, the phrase "never again" was never followed by a question mark. It had always been a declarative statement. Never again would the world sit by while systematic mass murder was carried out. And yet, given the deal the Obama administration has struck with the Islamic Republic of Iran to clear its path to nuclear weapons, it seems we have forgotten what it means to say -- and live -- "never again."

Illustration on sunsetting the existing Federal Tax Code by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Sunsetting the current tax code

Two active Republican presidential candidates have released thoughtful and detailed tax reform plans, and a third has renewed his call for the tax overhaul he promoted in 2008.

Illustration on the evils of Planned Parenthood by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Rotten to the core

The late Richard Pryor obviously wrote the defense used by the wonderful folks at Planned Parenthood, whose senior executives got caught on camera, twice, haggling over the price of the body parts -- lungs, livers, brains -- lifted from the bodies of unborn babies.

A voter can be seen in a voting booth Saturday, Aug. 9, 2014 in Honolulu.  Despite the rains and winds from Tropical Storm Iselle that pounded the state Friday, Hawaii will hold primary elections today.  (AP Photo/Marco Garcia)

Keeping the ballot secure

"Your vote counts" is a snappy slogan just short enough to fit on a lapel button, but snappy is not the same as "secure." As the 2016 campaign unfolds, there's renewed interest in enabling voters to vote over the Internet. The notion that choosing a president could be as easy as using a smartphone to order a pizza is tempting to some, but until cybersecurity wizards prove that a vote cast is a vote counted, Internet balloting is unreliably risky.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Bennington Girls are Easy'

"Bennington Girls Are Easy" has a title and cover that scream "chick-lit," but author Charlotte Silver has written a novel that is more than that. Her chicks, Cassandra Puffin and Sylvie Furst, start out as excited, ditzy, newly minted alums of Bennington College trying to make it in New York.

Republican presidential hopeful Donald Trump holds up a sheet of paper as he talks about calling fellow GOP presidential candidate Lindsey Graham during his South Carolina campaign kickoff rally in Bluffton on July 21, 2015. (Associated Press)

Trump's real problem

I could get behind the idea of a businessman instead of a politician, but not this businessman.

Respect differences

An armed man walks into building, opens fire and kills nine people, all of the same race. Who or what provided this opportunity? Can one walk into a shopping mall, movie theater or restaurant, randomly open fire and kill nine people of a specific race? It certainly could not happen at a public school or university, a military base or any other government institution. How ironic that it took a church to provide such a target-rich environment. Yet places of worship is the very place where diversity is taught as virtue, and not enforced as law.

No haircut for the First Amendment

Once upon a time, the idea of giving the First Amendment a haircut never occurred to anyone. The constitutional guarantee of free speech was held to be the cornerstone of the unique American experiment in government of the people, by the people, and for the people. The Founding Fathers wrote it, plain, direct and so unambiguous that even a United States senator could understand it.

Liz Sullivan, mother of Kathryn Steinle, is consoled by Sabine Durden as she cries during the testimony of Kathryn's father Jim Steinle during a Senate Judiciary hearing in Washington on Tuesday. The family told Congress they support changing the laws that allowed her alleged killer to remain in the United States despite being deported several times. (Associated Press)

No sanctuary for lawbreakers

There's bad immigration news, but it's leavened by news that is a little better. The bad news is that the Center for Immigration Studies puts the number of illegal aliens crossing the border by the seventh year of the Obama administration at 2.5 million. The better news is that the number of illegals swarming to the United States has leveled off, owing to hundreds of thousands who have gone home. Arrivals and departures are now about even.

Fracking Protest Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Nonsensical 'fractivist' pipeline hysteria

The anti-fracking movement has moved beyond the realm of the petty and unseemly into the ridiculous. Led by Yoko Ono, the avant-garde artist and widow of musician John Lennon, fracktivists are trying to stop construction of pipelines that would carry natural gas from the Marcellus Shale region in Pennsylvania and West Virginia, and the Utica Shale region in Ohio to markets in New York and New England.

Scuttle Obama's Iran deal, or surrender

The fundamental flaws in President Obama's deal with Iran have become well known. Among them: Iran's rulers will have the power to delay or even prevent inspections of suspected nuclear weapons facilities; Iran's rulers will receive tens of billions of dollars that they can spend as they please, including on terrorist groups; Iran's rulers will have several paths to nuclear weapons -- they have promised only not to rush. In the past, such promises have hardly been ironclad.

Illustration on how damaging Obama's comments are by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama's careless words

"Things fall apart," as Yeats was wont to say, "The center cannot hold." The center is most assuredly falling apart today, and who is at the center? Well, his name is Barack H. Obama. He is our president, and I think many Americans wish he would shut down. Every time he pipes up, especially on a peripheral issue, he makes things worse -- no, not worse, appalling.