Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration contrasting Trump supporters and opponents by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The great American divide

You could call it the tale of two election reflections, two competing points of view, two American perceptions of out-of-focus reality. Two important liberal voices “looked back” this week at the November election to try to figure out how and why Donald Trump, whom “everybody” despised and “nobody” wanted to win, actually did.

Illustration on government overspending by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Porking out with your money

Citizens Against Government Waste (CAGW), a nonprofit, nonpartisan organization working to eliminate governmental waste and fraud, just released its “2017 Congressional Pig Book,” an annual publication highlighting wasteful government spending that should embarrass each and every member of Congress.

The Capitol in Washington is quiet after lawmakers departed the for the Independence Day recess, Friday, June 30, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite) ** FILE **

Republicans, thy name is mud

- The Washington Times

Republicans, as a party, are reeling at their most recent failure — an epic one — regarding repeal-replace Obamacare. Stumbling seems to be Republicans’ new mode of transportation. What’s insanely angering about it is they’re stumbling over their own roadblocks.

Illustration on the homicidal spirit behind police killings by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Why the war on cops is a war on all of us

As a writer, I’ve gone out on patrol with police officers, accompanied narcotics squads on drug raids, observed detectives investigating murders and other crimes, and I’ve interviewed police commanders and commissioners in station houses and police headquarters.

Illustration of Vladimir Putin by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Putin’s playthings

About a year ago, Donald Trump Jr. met with a mysterious Russian lawyer, Natalia Veselnitskaya. Mr. Trump Jr. was purportedly eager to receive information that could damage Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign.

Lawyers' Gift from the CFPB Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A consumer bureau gift to trial lawyers

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), the arm of the government supposedly looking out for the interests of consumers, has trampled on consumers to deliver Christmas in July for the trial lawyers.

Illustration on the BNP and terrorism in Bangladesh by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Terrorism in Bangladesh under the guise of politics

The western media and several otherwise well-intentioned nongovernmental organizations routinely criticize Bangladesh for taking actions against leaders of the country’s main opposition party, the Bangladesh Nationalist Party, or BNP. They assume that accusing opposition party members with crimes is automatically undemocratic and undermines the rule of law.

This undated file photo shows writer George Orwell, author of "1984." (AP Photo, File)

Weaponizing language and communication

Fake news has become known for being a false story, gossip or even lies promulgated by the legacy media. We know what our news media establishment often delivers is nothing more than opinion masquerading as news. That in itself is a huge problem. We’re all learning about how to recognize it and how seriously to take it, if at all.

Illustration on the dire results of nuclear proliferation by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The proliferation problem from hell

On the surface, Iran and North Korea could hardly be more different. The former is a Middle Eastern theocracy, its ideology based on a bellicose reading of Islamic scripture. The latter is Asian and atheist, its ideology, Juche, loosely rooted in Stalinism. But scratch the surface, and you’ll find significant similarities.

Left Wing University Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When institutions drift left

I have recently been reminded of one of my earliest conclusions about the American left. I arrived at that conclusion when what we now call the left was relatively civilized. We called it, in those days, American liberalism, but even then it was fla fla.

Iran Non-Treaty Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Subverting the role of the treaty in American diplomacy

It is ironic that the contemporary discussion concerning American diplomacy should focus on the Paris Climate Accord. Students of history will appreciate that in 1778 that the first grand diplomatic debate of our country, the Treaty of Amity and Commerce, centered on France and is considered the first cornerstone treaty in American history.

Onwards with the Iranian Resistance: Regime change within reach (cover, July 18, 2017)

Compliant but dangerous Iran

Last Friday marked the second anniversary of an agreement on the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA), better known as the Iran nuclear deal. I was a critic of the deal at the time, and I continue to be alarmed by Iran’s aggression on the world stage.

How Trump’s opponents aid the Russians

In his recent Warsaw address, President Trump challenged our allies and Americans to defend Western Civilization. This requires courage and significant commitments of resources for defense, the instruments of soft power and diplomacy. However, it also requires better self-discipline in our domestic affairs, lest we give aid and comfort to our enemies.

William Maclay Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How the title of ‘president’ came to be

Thursday is the 280th anniversary of the birth of William Maclay, not exactly a household word, even in the homes of historians. He has a singular claim to fame, namely, as a senator in the first Congress under the Constitution meeting in 1789.

Related Articles

No more negativity

My husband and I have been long-time subscribers to The Washington Post, but we have finally had enough of its negativity and liberal bias. We recently decided to try The Washington Times, since the website promises to simply report the news without slant.

More youths, cheaper coverage

A recent Gallup survey found that the number of uninsured Americans increased by 2 million this year ("U.S. uninsured up by 2M this year as gains erode: Survey," Web, July 10). Coverage losses were most prominent among young adults.

Humanists not "Christophobic"

In "The separation of church and insanity" (Commentary, July 9), writer Larry W. Poland audaciously maligns millions of patriotic Americans as "Christophobic bigots" because we value the U.S. Constitution's First Amendment guarantee of religious liberty. This bedrock American value means nothing if it doesn't simultaneously protect people's freedom to practice their faith as long as that faith doesn't intrude on the rights of others, and protect people's freedom from religious imposition.

When 16th-century Venice and the Washington suburbs don't square

In the fifth of the Hogarth Press Shakespeare series, "New Boy," Tracy Chevalier transplants her version of Shakespeare's "Othello" from 16th century Venice and Cyprus to a 1970s Washington D.C. suburban school playground.

Waking up to the enemy in Iran

It was important that President Donald Trump open his meeting with Russian President Vladimir Putin by raising the point of Russian meddling in American elections.

Franklin Graham speaks with dignitaries, including U.N. Humanitarian Coordinator for Iraq Lisa Grande, at the Samaritan's Purse field hospital on the Plains of Nineveh in Iraq. Image courtesy of Samaritan's Purse.

Franklin Graham's right -- 'socialized medicine' sucks

- The Washington Times

Worldwide evangelist Franklin Graham cut to the chase about the Charlie Gard vs. Government life-and-death case that's being played out in U.K. courts right now, putting it plainly that parents ought to have the final say over their infants' health care -- not bottom-line bureaucrats feeding into their socialist system. In other words: Socialized medical care sucks.

President Donald Trump gives the thumbs-up as he and first lady Melania Trump board Air Force One, Wednesday, July 12, 2017, in Andrews Air Force Base, Md., en route to Paris. President Donald Trump and France's Emmanuel Macron may be the world's most unlikely political odd couple. Far apart on climate change and immigration, the two leaders will look for common ground on terrorism and defense policy when they meet in Paris. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Trump impeachment article brought to House -- LOL

- The Washington Times

Reps. Brad Sherman of California and Al Green of Texas have brought forward a formal article of impeachment against President Donald Trump for "high crimes and misdemeanors." There's a story about monkeys here that seems applicable.

Illustration on young people in the age of social media information by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Digitally savvy' and at the mercy of media fakers

When President Trump defended his use of social media as not simply "presidential" but "modern day presidential," he had a point. If George Washington, John Adams or Thomas Jefferson wanted to get a personal message duplicated for the public to read, it took at least 24 hours to get it printed (even when their friends owned the presses.)

Illustration on Iraq/ Kudistan relations by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Negotiating an amicable split

Iraqi security forces with the support of coalition forces are finally getting close to defeating ISIS in Iraq, which begs an important question: What comes next? More to the point, what governmental structure would best protect the many ethnic groups that live there?

Illustration on western conservative values by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Making goodness fashionable

There are conservatives, and then there are Western conservatives. Western conservatives think differently about the world. Our wisdom, forged in hard work and steeled by grit, helped settle the West and could provide some much-needed common sense to the rest of the nation.