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John Kennedy     Associated Press photo

Goats in the White House

- The Washington Times

It’s the conceit of every age that it’s uniquely entitled to all the superlatives: it’s the best, the worst, the biggest, the smallest. Nothing before was anything like the present age, nor is it possible that anything in the future will surpass it.

Illustration on the potential political rift presented by the upcoming election by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

When an election produces a political realignment

What do the election years 1800, 1828, 1860, 1896, 1932 and 1980 have in political common? They are usually described as “critical” or “realigning” elections by historians who argue they produced a significant realignment in our political system.

President Barack Obama speaks at the 2016 White House Tribal Nations Conference held in the Mellon Auditorium in Washington, Monday, Sept. 26, 2016. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Another useless Iraq surge

Pessimists and cynics are annoying, mostly because events prove them to be right far more often than they are proven wrong. Sometimes pessimism is the necessary result of an examination of history.

Illustration on new moves toward animal liberation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Food for thought about animal liberation

Peter Singer, Princeton professor and author of the book “Animal Liberation,” will be taking his radical views center stage at the upcoming “The Future of Food” event in Washington, D.C. Hosted by the extremist Humane Society of the United States (HSUS), the choice of Mr. Singer to keynote the event offers a peek at just how out of touch animal liberation activists are: While Mr. Singer is against eating animals, he’s OK with the idea of having sex with them.

The Second Jacksonian Revolution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When ‘deplorables’ took back their country

The 1829 inauguration of Andrew Jackson ranks as the most raucous in American history. Presidents in those days traditionally held open house for the general public after being sworn in, but no one anticipated that hordes of Jackson’s rough-and-tumble supporters would descend on the nation’s capital for the big day or that they would troupe over to the White House following his inaugural address to shake his hand and guzzle free booze.

Growing the American Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to jump-start the economy

As the presidential debates get underway, we hope that the moderators set personalities aside and spend some quality time asking questions of both candidates about their plans to grow the American economy.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves to the crowd during a rally in Roanoke, Va., Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Trump faces Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton in the first of three debates Monday.  (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Terrorism, refugees and Donald Trump

Hilary Clinton’s refugee plan is an open invitation for Radical Islam’s unyielding nature to run roughshod over American culture.

Federal Land Grab Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Grinding westerners under the federal boot

The federal government owns an estimated one-third of all the land in the United States. But this is only a rough estimate, because even the federal government does not actually know how much land it controls.

Illustration on the contrasting media coverage of Hillary and Trump by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The apoplectic liberals

- The Washington Times

Is it journalistic malpractice to quote each side of the argument and leave it to readers to draw their own conclusions?

A study in nuclear contrast

Astudy in contrast: North Korea is killing itself to get an atomic bomb; Kazakhstan is rich because it gave its nukes away.

Charlotte police encountering protesters earlier in the week.           Associated Press photo

A riot that dares not speak its name

- The Washington Times

Charlotte is the conversation we’re getting about race in America, with rioting, death and looting, encouraged by the noise of the mob, the purple rhetoric of certain newspapers, bloody mayhem on the television screen, and encouragement, no doubt unintended, by the president of the United States. It’s a carnival out there, but not much conversation.

Illustration on two possible economic futures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Liars, statistics and politics

This presidential season Americans have been treated to the usual outrageous campaign promises and extraordinary candidate alibis about past transgressions, but those pale in comparison to claims about gains in family incomes served up by the Obama administration last week.

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Red Tape Attack on Coatings Industry Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Rolling out the red tape

Here's one thing everyone can agree on: Federal regulatory and international tax policy implications can be as exciting as, well, watching paint dry.

Promotional poster for Clinton, Inc.         The Washington Times

'Clinton Inc.'

What a difference a week makes. A week after Hillary Clinton stumbled, both literally -- at a Sept. 11 memorial -- and figuratively -- by calling half of Donald Trump supporters "a basket of deplorables" -- polls show that the race for the White House is essentially tied.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally at Germain Arena, Monday, Sept. 19, 2016, in Ft. Myers, Fla. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

A reality check of the election

Government spending and borrowing are once again growing as a percentage of GDP. The federal debt held by the public was 35 percent in 2007. It is 74 percent today, and is projected to be 140 percent in 2046 — provided nothing goes wrong.

Illustration on union leveraging against employers through safety inspections by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Pushing back against a union foot in the door

For small businesses, the most valuable asset is their employees. Without productive workers and a positive workplace environment, a business cannot thrive against tough competition from other firms, large and small.

Michael Dukakis (Associated Press) ** FILE **

Reading the handwriting on the wall

- The Washington Times

Everything old becomes new, if you wait long enough. Barack Obama "reassures" the nation in the wake of another radical Islamic attack on New York City and in nearby New Jersey, and a frenzy of stabbing in a shopping mall in Minnesota.

Illustration on Edward Snowdon by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Edward Snowden's gambit

In 2013, a dishonest man with a fabricated record in government service made a decision that did more damage to U.S. national security than any other individual in our nation's history. His subsequent actions deeply betrayed the American people.

Tents used by the homeless line a downtown Los Angeles street with the skyline behind Tuesday, Sept. 22, 2015. Los Angeles officials say they will declare a state of emergency on homelessness and propose spending $100 million to reduce the number of people living on city streets. City Council President Herb Wesson, members of the council's Homelessness and Poverty Committee and Mayor Eric Garcetti announced the plan Tuesday outside City Hall, as homeless people dozed nearby on a lawn.(AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes)

A poor way to measure poverty

Poverty is down, the latest Census Bureau report shows. Good news, to be sure, but some context is needed. A closer look at the data reveals that things aren't necessarily the way they appear.

States in Red Ink Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A pending national financial crisis

Government transparency and accountability are two issues surfacing this election. Well-known examples include Donald Trump's resistance to releasing his tax returns, Secretary Hillary Clinton's murky answers about her private email server and both of their resistance to releasing comprehensive health-related files.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally, Saturday, Sept. 17, 2016, in Colorado Springs, Colo. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci)

Heebie-jeebies for the Democrats

To hear the big media tell it, the Republicans are angry, split and spoiling for a fight with each other. This is not altogether bad. Democrats and cats have fought for years and the result is more cats and more Democrats. Maybe it will work for Republicans.

Johnson right choice for president

The Libertarian ticket of Gary Johnson and William Weld brings a huge amount of executive experience, acquired when the candidates were governors. I believe governors are the most qualified politicians to ascend to the presidency.

FILE - In this March 18, 2014 file photo, voters cast their ballots in the Illinois primary in Hinsdale, Ill. A lawsuit is challenging Election Day voter registration in Illinois while prompting concerns from civil rights groups about voter access in the November election. The lawsuit, filed in federal court last month by the legal arm of the Illinois Policy Institute, argues that voters in all 102 counties don't have equal access to same-day registration so it should be abolished at the precinct level. (AP Photo/M. Spencer Green, File)

Countering the lies of the left

The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld Ohio's election reform law, but liberal courts have struck down voter photo ID laws in other states such as North Carolina and North Dakota and watered down photo ID laws in Texas and Wisconsin.

BOOK REVIEW: 'A Gentleman in Moscow'

The crime of Count Alexander Rostov is that he is an unrepentant aristocrat in the bloody aftermath of the Russian revolution. His punishment as imposed by a Bolshevik tribunal in 1922 is lifetime house arrest in the Hotel Metropol in Moscow.

LETTER TO THE EDITOR: Science determines sex

The Michigan education board is set to approve guidelines declaring that students themselves are best qualified to determine their own gender identity, and that outside confirmation from medical and mental health professionals is not required ("Michigan board approves LGBT guidance to schools," Web, Sept. 14).

China Taunt Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How China challenges the West

The red-carpet treatment was given to every world leader attending the Beijing G-20 economic summit meeting Sept. 4-5, 2016, which was hosted by Chinese President Xi Jinping. Everyone, that is, except for the president of the United States of America. There were no stairs for President Obama to emerge from the usual front door of Air Force One. The White House entourage, including the press photographer, were deliberately harassed.

Barack Obama was born to a Kenyan father, also named Barack Obama, and a white mother from Kansas, Stanley Ann Dunham. ** FILE **

The story that won't die

The false story of Barack Obama's birth is the story that just won't die. It's apparently too valuable to too many people to put it in the graveyard of myths, fables and convenient tall tales.