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Illustration on the success of Trumponomics in red states by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Where Trumponomics is working

One reason the two of us were so confident that President Trump’s economic policies would be positive for workers, the economy and the stock market, is that we’ve seen first-hand these policies work in the states. Many liberal economists have been insisting that Mr. Trump’s promise of a 3 or 4 percent growth is a fantasy and that 2 percent growth is the best we can do.

Modest Growth Rate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The tax cut reality

As Republicans balance competing interests to craft a tax cut, both Democrats and the Trump administration are making outrageous claims.

Making Pyramid Schemes Illegal Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Keeping shady business practices at bay

Scams affect us all. As Nebraska’s attorney general from 2003-2015, one of my key priorities was safeguarding against scams. In 2010, I helped Nebraska’s Legislature pass a model law to protect consumers from pyramid schemes. Similar laws have now been adopted in 21 states.

Roger Goodell. (Associated Press)

The NFL owners with a playbook of their own

- The Washington Times

The owners of the National Football League finally came up with a playbook of their own. Beset by players who want to be political commentators who work from their knees, and by angry fans who only want to watch a football game without insult to the country they love, the owners consulted their playbook and think they can run out the clock.

Illustration on the clique of dictators by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating the dictators’ clique

A dictators’ clique of China, Russia, Iran and North Korea threatens democracies everywhere. They are more dangerous than any past dictators because they have or are about to have nuclear weapons and the means to deliver them. The best way for peace-loving nations to oppose these dictators is through a global coalition centered on the United States and Europe. The U.S. and European democracies led coalitions that defeated dictators in the World War I, World War II and the Cold War. They can do it again.

Illustration on police and minorities by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Deadly Democratic cities

After a speech in Middletown, Pennsylvania, this week, President Trump sat for an interview with Fox News’ Sean Hannity. No doubt it was friendly territory. For the president, Mr. Hannity’s questions were underhand softballs tossed down the center of the plate, and the replies were vintage Trump.

Illustration on the strategic importance of an independent Kurdistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward an independent Kurdistan

The autonomous Kurdistan region of northern Iraq held a referendum on independence on Sept. 25. It was overwhelmingly approved. This referendum, not surprisingly however, has precipitously raised tensions not only with Iraq but also with Turkey, Syria and Iran, all of which have large — and restive — Kurdish minorities.

Illustration on the growing accusations against men as a group for sexual misconduct by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Young men’s lives matter, too

Everybody despises Harvey. Usually by this time in the public pursuit of a villain the scoundrel begins to attract a little undeserved sympathy. Not this time. The accusers keep on coming, with the passion of Emile Zola famously accusing the French government of hounding Alfred Dreyfus — “J’ accuse!” — only because he was a Jew.

It's All About the Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Trump-McConnell detente

That was some chaotic scene in the White House Rose Garden Monday. After lunch with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Trump assured combative reporters and the country that the two are getting along just fine, in spite of the Senate’s failure to repeal and replace Obamacare and an uncertain future over tax reform, the other Republican signature issue party members promised to get done.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell watches from the sidelines before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers in Minneapolis, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)

NFL missed golden opportunity

- The Washington Times

Commissioner Roger Goodell emerged from a meeting with NFL players and owners and announced, indirectly, that it was still A-OK to kneel for the national anthem. “We did not ask for that,” he said, in answer to a question about whether the league would demand players stand. And in so doing, the NFL has missed a golden opportunity to soothe and calm tensions.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is regarded by most conservatives and Republicans outside Washington as the embodiment of all that’s wrong with Washington. A recent Harvard study found him the least popular of all nationally known political figures and a group of my fellow conservatives told him in an open letter that as far as they’re concerned, he is “the swamp.”

Related Articles

In this Sept. 29, 2017, file photo, California Gov. Jerry Brown gestures while speaking in San Francisco. (AP Photo/Eric Risberg, file)

Cracking down on pronouns

There's something about the Left Coast. Maybe there's something in the salt water besides the makings of taffy. California was once derided as "the land of fruit and nuts," and the nuttiness has spread northward along the coast. Just when Gov. Jerry Brown of California had outgrown his reputation as Gov. Moonbeam, he does something to reclaim it.

Charting the course of the presidency over time

Jeremi Suri, a professor of history at the University of Texas, is author/editor of eight previous books, numerous newspaper and magazine pieces, and a popular guest on television talk shows.

Medication 'motive' for shootings?

"The making of the Las Vegas murderer" (Web, Oct. 12) examines the possibility that the shooter was "radicalized." Yet earlier, the FBI, lacking any perceived motive, was asking citizens for tips that might help them find a motive. I say anyone whose mind is deranged by certain drugs doesn't need a motive. The shooter allegedly had a doctor who prescribed him Valium.

Most crushing D.C. sports loss

In his column "Meltdown all-too-familiar for Washington fans" (Web, Oct. 13) Thom Loverro ponders where the Washington Nationals' playoff loss last Thursday to the Chicago Cubs will rank "among the D.C. Sports Hall of Failures. It's hard to judge one over the other."

While early voting may seem more convenient, it actually decreases turnout. (Associated Press/File)

Early voting disadvantages seem to outweigh benefits

Early voting -- opening a limited number of locations where people can cast their ballots prior to Election Day -- is a "reform" that states should reconsider. Its disadvantages seem to outweigh its benefits.

In this Friday, Oct. 13, 2017, file photo, President Donald Trump makes a statement on Iran policy in the Diplomatic Reception Room of the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

Donald Trump won't be impeached

- The Washington Times

Listen up, Impeach Trump crowd: President Donald Trump's not going to be impeached. He won't. So let it go. Move on -- and take your MoveOn.org money with you.

San Francisco 49ers quarterback Brian Hoyer (2) is sacked by Washington Redskins outside linebacker Preston Smith (94) and defensive tackle Matthew Ioannidis (98) during the first half of an NFL football game in Landover, Md., Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark Tenally)

SNYDER: Washington is doing what good teams do

Arguably the least-attractive home date before the season began, the 49ers' 0-5 record only added to the blase feelings. San Francisco should've been a gimme. But in actuality, this was a big game, as big as they come. It would've been even bigger if Washington didn't hold on for a 26-24 victory.

Washington Redskins quarterback Kirk Cousins (8) carries the ball toward the end zone a touchdown as San Francisco 49ers defensive end Solomon Thomas (94) looks on during the second half of an NFL football game in Landover, Md., Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

LOVERRO: Sunday's game adds to Shanahan's case for Cousins

Here's Kyle Shanahan's case for Kirk Cousins to come play for him next season: "Kirk, I nearly just beat your heavily favored team on the road with a kid fresh out of college who had barely stepped on an NFL football field. Imagine what the two of us can do together."

Illustration on pro-active measures for protecting American cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia's aggressive cyberwar

Russian President Vladimir Putin's regime has been highly aggressive in pursuing cyberwar and cyberespionage at least since its 2007 attacks on the Estonian government. The fact that it is routinely attacking U.S. defense and intelligence cyber-networks can be no surprise.

Pope Francis, left, asperges incense in front of an icon of Mary and baby Jesus as he celebrates a canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

A step toward ending injustice in abortion

Human liberty and dignity notched a big win earlier this month. The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act is a landmark step adding further protections for the unborn by criminalizing abortions performed after 20 weeks into a pregnancy.

Illustration on the history leading up the North Korean nuclear crisis by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How we got to a nuclear North Korea

President Trump and his Cabinet have said repeatedly that the present state of affairs with North Korea represents 25 years of American foreign policy failure going back over at least three presidents -- Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Reviewing this disaster, there are at least three major mileposts.

American Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A better deal with NAFTA 2.0

America's trade negotiators are now in the process of crafting a 2.0 update of the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Fortunately, it now appears that Donald Trump's intention on NAFTA is to mend it, not end it. The trade deal has been a stunning economic success for all three nations: Canada, Mexico and the United States. Freer trade has meant steady increases in the volume of trade, greater competitiveness and lower prices.

FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, file photo, former President Barack Obama speaks during the Goalkeepers Conference in New York. Obama is set to return to the campaign trail for the first time since he left office with a rally to help Democrat Ralph Northam in Virginia's closely watched race for governor. The Northam campaign announced Wednesday, Oct. 11, that the lieutenant governor and Obama will appear together at an event in Richmond on Oct. 19. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

The Iran nuclear agreement finally gets a skeptical eye

Maximum hot air, minimum bottom line. That's the prospect for the world over the next few weeks in the wake of President Trump's Friday declaration that he won't certify that the Islamic mullahs in Iran are living up to their end of the deal they made with Barack Obama. This was the one-sided agreement by which the mullahs would give up their quest for nuclear weapons.

In this Nov. 14, 2013, file photo, producer Harvey Weinstein attends the New York premiere of "Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom" in New York. Weinstein faces multiple allegations of sexual abuse and harassment from some of the biggest names in Hollywood. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)

Democratic politicians look for ways to express high dudgeon on the cheap

Nearly a week went by before Hillary Clinton pulled together a statement about Harvey Weinstein's abuse of women. Hillary's against abusing women and it turns out that she took so long to say so because she was trying to find the words to describe how deep her outrage runs. Abuse of women, and even credible accusations of forcible rape, are not unknown in Hillaryworld. Perhaps she hoped to draft Bubba's help to describe her outrage. Bubba's good with words. Or perhaps she was so busy tabulating good ol' Harvey's contributions to various Clinton "charities" that she just didn't get around to it sooner.