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President Barack Obama speaks to reporters in the State Dining Room of the White House in Washington, Friday, Oct. 2, 2015. President Obama is rejecting Russia's military campaign in Syria, saying it fails to distinguish between terrorist groups and moderate rebel forces with a legitimate interest in a negotiated end to the civil war. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

The cipher in the White House

- The Washington Times

Perhaps it’s not fair to blame Barack Obama for the mess he’s making. The Middle East is where chaos was invented, after all, and perhaps not even the collection of incompetents and boobs the president has installed in the White House could make things this bad. Maybe it’s someone else’s fault. He blames the Jews.

Illustration on Putin's moves in Syria by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Fast-roping toward war in the Middle East

The Russians are rapidly reinforcing their bridgehead in Syria, adding ground troops to their air, marine and naval forces. It is a classic air, land and sea intervention by a military establishment that understands how combined arms build synergies and broaden capabilities.

Responsible Immigration Laws Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Facing the agonizing immigration duty

It’s a truth universally acknowledged that no nation can sustain open borders. Even the wealthiest, most popular “nations of immigrants” such as the United States cannot possibly accept everyone who wants to immigrate or even qualifies to do so.

Illustration on Putin's actions in Syria by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Beware Putin and his ‘anti-Hitler coalition’

Contrary to the principles of American foreign policy of the last 70 years, President Obama and Secretary of State John Kerry tacitly invited Russia to “help” monitor things in the Middle East. Now they are learning that there are lots of Middle East scenarios far worse than the relative quiet Iraq that the Obama administration inherited in January 2009 — and soon abandoned.

Illustration on the call for a better armed society by William Brown/Tribune Content Agency

Ban gun-free zones

Would you put a sign outside your house saying, “Doors unlocked,” or “We’re not home”?

Illustration on developing Romania's tourist industry by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Ongoing flux in East-Central Europe

For nearly a century, East-Central Europe has been a perennially unsettled region. Pragmatic deals cut after World War I, with more following World War II, have kept the area in an unending state of flux.

Illustration on Putin's Middle East intentions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Pravda’ on Russia in Syria

Pravda is the most abused word in the Russian language. Though it means “truth,” we learned it as the name of a Soviet-era, government-controlled newspaper that printed everything except the truth.

Illustration on the impact of Syrian mass migration to Europe by Schrank, The Independent on Sunday, London, England

Paralysis over Syria

There is turbulence in the eurozone and its disquieting genesis lies in the protracted Syrian civil war, some 750 miles to the east.

Illustration on the position of the D.C. Metropolitan police under Chief Lanier by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Integrity versus loyalty

Metropolitan Police Chief Cathy Lanier is often portrayed by an admiring media as an almost uniquely popular and effective law enforcement leader, who has made the District safer than ever by putting together one of the most effective big city police departments in the country.

Illustration on FDIC targeting of the payday loan industry by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When bureaucrats rule personal preference

Ours is a nation of laws, not men. Our Constitution requires the concurrence of majorities in both houses of Congress and the signature of the president in order to create those laws.

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The coming coding conundrum

"Gray's Anatomy" illustrated the entire human body with 1,247 engravings when it was published in 1918, but starting today doctors must employ nearly 70,000 codes to document their efforts to heal it.

Russian President President Vladimir Putin listens to United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon after the 70th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, New York, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. (Mikhail Klimentyev, RIA-Novosti, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

When big talk meets action

President Obama was full of talk this week, declaring that as the world's greatest military power the United States will defeat the Islamic State, also known as ISIS. No argument here. The United States can defeat any enemy it seriously sets out to defeat.

Martland's treatment unsurprising

The U.S. Army discharges decorated and brave Sgt. First Class Charles Martland for having the temerity to stand up for young children in Afghanistan who are regularly raped and sexually abused by perverted old scumbags on an American military base.

Illustration on China's coverup of it's abuses in Tibet by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Forgotten Tibet

Chinese leader Xi Jinping's state dinner at the White House last week received fulsome coverage -- about the fashion, the food and tech giants in attendance.

Illustration contrasting Democrat and GOP views of the presidency by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Love and hate for big government

The two parties' differing views of big government explain their differing challenges in winning the 2016 presidential election.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Stephen Harper'

Stephen Harper became the 22nd prime minister of Canada on Feb. 6, 2006. The Conservative Party leader has focused his time and energies on important issues such as lower taxes, smaller government, fiscal responsibility and strong foreign policy measures.

Illustration on Calvin Coolidge's views on taxation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Taxing propositions

The White House Historical Association is promoting a Christmas ornament honoring our 30th president, Calvin Coolidge.

Illustration on Pope Francis' U.S. visit by Donna Grethen/Tribune Content Agency

Papal burnout

Unpopular though it may be to say so, I, for one, grew exhausted by the nonstop pronouncements and commentaries of Pope Francis. The spiritual leader of 1 billion Catholics -- roughly half of the world's Christians -- Francis just completed a high-profile, endlessly publicized visit to the United States.

We're not alone

Water deposits have been found on Mars. Really, is this such a great revelation? For years, astronomers have focused on ice formations at Mars' poles. Given the recent photographs from Voyager, we know that Pluto contains water. Common sense tells us that water is not indigenous to Earth only.

United States President Barack Obama addresses the 70th session of the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 28, 2015. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)

A climate of delusion

President Obama's globalist rhetoric captured hearts at the United Nations but it will take more than hot air to make global warming cool with anyone but the easily fooled.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump acknowledges applause at a town hall event Thursday, Sept. 17, 2015, in Rochester, N.H. (AP Photo/Robert F. Bukaty)

Getting serious about taxes

The "issues" in a political campaign are often called by easily bored camp followers as "DBI," something dull but important. Many voters, addicted to watching the world pass by on the little video screen, sometimes think "issues" are best ignored. Better entertainment may be at hand.

Illustration on past struggles over the Federal budget by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Continuing irresolution

If you think today's end of the fiscal year is unique to Democratic President Obama and a Republican Congress wrangling over the federal government's budget, you're wrong. Throughout much of the nation's past, a war of efforts and words prevailed between the two branches.