Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Illustration on threatened government meddling in the private sector world of sports by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Jumping offsides on ‘Deflategate’

Super Bowl XLIX (49) will be played this Sunday. Sadly, the anticipated matchup between the AFC champion New England Patriots and NFC champion Seattle Seahawks has already had the wind knocked out of its sails — or, in this case, the air out of its footballs.

The Democratic assault on free speech

- The Washington Times

Everybody’s for free speech — until somebody says something he doesn’t like. But the genius of the First Amendment is that it is so direct and plain that even a lawyer or a judge can understand it.

Illustration on the Obama administrations role in Iranian nuclear ambitions by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Iran’s price for Obama’s coveted legacy

The importance of any political event is best measured against its opponents’ reactions. By that yardstick, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu’s agreement to speak about the dangers of Iran’s pursuit of nuclear weapons before a joint session of Congress is already enormously significant.

Illustration on American's diminished economic freedom by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Regaining lost economic freedom

If you were to rank all the countries of the world based on their level of economic freedom, you’d think the United States would be a shoo-in for first place, right? Surely we would be at least somewhere in the top five.

Illustration on the fall of Yemen by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Yemen’s collapse demonstrates Obama’s foreign policy failures

Last Tuesday night, President Obama assured the American people that their nation is secure because of his leadership. His “steady, persistent resolve,” Mr. Obama proclaimed in his State of the Union speech, has resulted in a “safer, more prosperous world.”

Illustration on corrupt reprisals from the IRS by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Payback from the IRS

The Internal Revenue Service’s woes did not begin or end with Lois Lerner and the agency’s targeting of political opponents with punitive action. Earlier this month we became painfully aware (again) that political games and punishing the taxpayer appear to be the burgeoning raison d’etre of the tax-collecting agency.

Illustration on the illusory nature of the economic recovery for the middle class by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama’s illusory economic recovery

The big news from this week’s State of the Union address is that the economic “crisis is over.” Apparently, we’ve been rescued from a second Great Depression and everything this president has done to fix the economy has worked. All that was missing from Mr. Obama’s celebration was the old “Icky Shuffle” end zone dance.

A woman waves a Greek flag during a speech by the leader of Syriza left-wing party Alexis Tsipras outside Athens University Headquarters, Sunday, Jan. 25, 2015. A triumphant Alexis Tsipras told Greeks that his radical left Syriza party's win in Sunday's early general election meant an end to austerity and humiliation and that the country's regular and often fraught debt inspections were a thing of the past. "Today the Greek people have made history. Hope has made history," Tsipras said in his victory speech at a conference hall in central Athens. (AP Photo/Fotis Plegas G.)

Now Greeks should dump the Euro

Since 2008, the Greek economy has shrunk by 25 percent, and the stock market is down more than 80 percent.

Illustration on school choice by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The steady progress of school choice

Sunday marked the start of National School Choice Week, an annual celebration of education reforms that give parents the power to pick the schools, public or private, that are best for their children.

Obama, General of the Free Army Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Obama’s Free Stuff Army

Fresh from offering “free” health care, “free” phones and “free” food to the masses, he’s upped the bribery to “free” community college tuition and “free” child care. It’s not that the Clintons oppose any of these; they just need to affect moderation in case Hillary runs for president and has to knock back boilermakers again with the good old boys in Pennsylvania taverns.

Related Articles

Illustration on the need for sanctions against Iran by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The case for deadline-triggered sanctions

Experienced negotiators know this: The side most willing to walk away from the table generally wins. The side that seems desperate for a deal loses. Yet President Obama is telling the entire world that he needs an agreement with Iran's rulers more than they need an agreement with him.

A downfall advanced by bad jewelry

It was a 2,800 carat diamond necklace that many people thought was ugly and it may be that Queen Marie Antoinette never either wore it or saw it, but it made a bitterly ironic contribution to the collapse of her world and her consequent death.

Volunteers tie the wooden cross that was carried through the streets of Etna, Pa., a Pittsburgh suburb, to the larger cross in the cemetery where their annual "Drama of The Cross", service was done on Good Friday, Friday, April 18, 2014. Clergymen from Christian churches in the borough organize a trek with volunteers carrying the wooden cross through borough streets to the cemetery as part of their services for the holiday. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)

A Christian's response to insult

In the aftermath of the Charlie Hebdo terrorist attack, it's worth recalling how Christians respond to insult, by turning the other cheek, forgiving our enemies, and loving those who persecute us.

The rich pay more than their fair share

Punitive overtaxation on the most productive, and excessive redistribution, shuts down long term economic growth and the American Dream.

Illustration on pro-life millennial voters by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The abortion intensity gap

In 2008 and 2012, the Democrats trampled over Republicans when it came to mobilizing and recruiting the younger generation. In 2008, Barack Obama beat John McCain among 18- to 34-year-olds by 34 points; in 2012, Mitt Romney lost by 23 points to President Obama in the same age group. It was a trouncing by any standard.

President Barack Obama waves before giving his State of the Union address before a joint session of Congress on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, Jan. 20, 2015 (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The state of the president

The Constitution requires presidents to provide Congress with periodic information on the "state of the union" and President George Washington delivered the required information in a speech to a joint session of Congress in 1790. That turned out to be an unfortunate precedent. Most of his successors haven't been able to resist making it an occasion for a speech, either.

Illustration on accusations of racism against the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences by Alexander hunter/The Washington Times

Al Sharpton vs. Hollywood

Last week, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences unveiled its 2015 Oscar nominations. Popular movies, including "The Imitation Game," "Boyhood" and "The Theory of Everything," received some positive recognition. Other films, including "The LEGO Movie" and my personal favorite, "Mr. Turner," received lesser nominations or were snubbed in certain categories.

Another White House gaffe

Last Friday Secretary of State John Kerry brought James Taylor to the stage to sing "You've Got a Friend" to the French people ("John Kerry in Paris, set for James Taylor croon: 'You've Got a Friend,'" Web, Jan. 16). It was widely seen as the Obama administration's way of saying sorry after failing to send any high-level officials to the "Je Suis Charlie" March in Paris, which was attended by 2.7 million people, including 40 heads of state.

This undated image posted online and made available on Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014 by Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently, an anti-Islamic State group organization, shows children at an Islamic State group training camp in Raqqa, Syria. The image has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting. Across the vast region in Syria and Iraq that is part of the Islamic State group's self-declared caliphate, children are being inculcated with the extremist group's radical and violent interpretation of Shariah law. (AP Photo/Raqqa Is Being Slaughtered Silently)

When children are expendable

If children are the future, the terrorists who ravish and ravage the young in pursuit of empire portend a very bleak future in the benighted lands. Evil men continue to poison the young with the venom and bile that describe the distortions of their religion. The world stands aghast and incredulous at the violence visited upon the innocent, and at the reluctance to judge another's faith that is the mark of American tolerance. The fear of reprisal restrains many Muslims from condemning acts they know are atrocities. There is no holy writ anywhere to excuse using children as fodder for cannon. No one's God is that cynical.

Remembering a Congress that worked more than it waltzed

The Congress of Vienna, begun in September 1814 and concluded in June 1815, was unique, an unprecedented Pan-European conference that laid the foundations for the post-Napoleonic age. It was also the first superpower summit.

Chips off the block

Credit card fraud is everybody's headache. If the hackers haven't got to you yet, they will. There's a new weapon against the hackers, called "chip-and-PIN technology," but replacing a billion credit cards is expensive and some of the big banks are reluctant to put out the millions (and millions) of dollars to pay for it. The federal government is using chip-and-PIN cards but not many private users in the United States have access to it.

Illustration on The State of the Union Address by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Obama sings the same old song

Here's a suggestion for Joni Ernst, the new Republican senator from Iowa, who will deliver the GOP response to the State of the Union address Tuesday night. Get a chorus together and open with this old Sammy Cahn-Jule Styne number: "It seems to me I've heard that song before; it's from an old familiar score, I know it well, that melody."

Illustration on excessive government surveillance and national security by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Terror undeterred by mass surveillance

The failure of the massive surveillance state established by liberal western governments is becoming more and more apparent. One such failure was accidentally confirmed by both Sen. Dianne Feinstein and House Speaker John Boehner in just the last week.

No halo for Holder on forfeiture fix

Attorney General Eric H. Holder Jr. announced on Friday that the Justice Department would cease sharing confiscated private property with state and local police agencies under its Equitable Sharing program. Asset forfeiture has recently been widely denounced by both liberals and conservatives as an civil liberties atrocity that has victimized innocent Americans across the nation. A Washington Post report suggested that the policy change was part of Mr. Holder's efforts "to burnish his place in history."

Nigel Farage leader of Britain's UK Independence Party (UKIP) celebrates as he hears the results of the south east region European Parliamentary Election vote at the Guildhall in Southampton, England, Monday, May 26, 2014. From Portugal to Finland, voters of 21 nations cast ballots Sunday to decide the makeup of the next European Parliament and help determine the European Union’s future leaders and course. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)

In defense of Europe's so-called far right

Rather than engage in name-calling and attempts at exclusion, established institutions should encourage the populist parties to moderate, become more sophisticated, and fully participate in the political process.

Former Navy SEAL and author of the book "American Sniper" Chris Kyle poses in Midlothian, Texas. (AP Photo/The Fort Worth Star-Telegram, Paul Moseley)

‘American Sniper’ hits close to home

From the Alamo to Audie Murphy, Texans revere our war heroes. As the closing credits for "American Sniper" rolled across the screen last weekend, a packed audience lingered in the dark silence, reverent and maybe stunned by what they had just seen. The reason: The movie depiction of Navy SEAL Chris Kyle's heroic life of service provided an increasingly rare glimpse of what were once unquestioned American truths.

After the Massacre Azerbaijan 1990

From tragedy to independence

Twenty-five years ago today, while then-President George H.W. Bush was delivering his State of the Union message before a joint session of Congress in Washington, Soviet troops attacked unarmed civilian protesters in the Azerbaijani capital of Baku, killing some 133 people and wounding hundreds of others.

We're making it needlessly difficult for Americans to save and invest. That hurts job growth and depresses wages.



(Photo credit should read KAREN BLEIER/AFP/Getty Images)

The shared benefits of tax reform

Lawmakers in Washington have plenty of work ahead of them this year, so the temptation to punt on everything but the "hot" issues will be strong. Here's one they should tackle without hesitation: tax reform.