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members of the Oakland Raiders take a knee while others stand during the national anthem.           Associated Press photo

Once upon a knee at the old ball game

- The Washington Times

There’s a lunatic in Asia credibly threatening the world with a hydrogen bomb. Congress can’t pull itself together to do anything. But enough of that. We’re all obsessed now with what a few tubby athletes think about the flag, the national anthem and the country others have shed blood and lives to defend and protect.

Illustration on the broken ideology of Socialism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

If oppression could inspire happiness

It is a fair bet that Sen. Bernie Sanders (and most of his followers), unlike tens of millions of others, never read George Orwell’s “Animal Farm” or Friedrich von Hayek’s “The Road to Serfdom.” Why do so many embrace a system — socialism — that has always failed, whether it was a form of state socialism or the various utopian communities started in the United States and Europe over the last couple of hundred years?

Democrat Thumb on the Scale Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fuzzy polls that trash Trump

- The Washington Times

How soon they forget. Heartened by a stream of poll data suggesting that the public is less than enamored with his performance as president, Donald Trump’s critics who’ve been taken in by polls before seem to think they have the man on the ropes.

Illustration on the Vietnam War     The Washington Times

The Vietnam War revisited

Filmmakers Ken Burns and Lynn Novick have performed a vital public service in making their documentary “The Vietnam War” for the Public Broadcasting Service. Given the division that war caused in America, it is a pretty fair chronicling of the way things were a half-century ago. The film brought back a lot of mostly bad memories to people of my generation.

The Al Gore Twister Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Alarmism in climate reporting

In the wake of Hurricanes Harvey and Irma, many members of the media and the political left have been quick to pin the blame for these storms on climate change. While there is no question that the hurricanes have wreaked havoc across many communities, including in my home state of Texas, these severe storms are not indicative of a climate trend — despite what the clickbait masters would have us believe.

Federal Reserve Chair Janet Yellen closes her notebook after answering questions during a news conference following the Federal Open Market Committee meeting in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

The Federal Reserve’s handwringing over low inflation

The Federal Reserve has been absolutely flummoxed that inflation has stayed so low for so long. Gasoline prices and headline inflation may be getting a temporary jolt from Harvey, but core inflation — consumer prices less energy and food costs — remains well below the Fed’s official target of 2 percent.

Illustration on the development of technology and political campaigning by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Turning up the heat on America’s electioneering

Last year’s election signaled a change in American politics equal to that of the 1960s. The channel for this change was the medium — or rather, media — through which politics now flows. This change in media has brought an evolution in America’s method of communication, and transformed politics as well. The nation can extol it or lament it, but cannot escape it.

In this Sept. 22, 2017, photo President Donald Trump speaks at a campaign rally in Huntsville, Ala. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson)

A tax cut for all Americans

When you hear the phrase “corporate tax cut,” what do you picture? Middle-class workers, or Uncle Moneybags, the character from the Monopoly board game?

President Donald Trump boards Air Force One at Morristown Municipal airport, Sunday, Sept. 24, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Critics call Trump ‘self-interested’ like it’s a bad thing

- The Washington Times

As a businessman, a builder and a real estate tycoon in the most fiercely competitive real estate market on the planet, President Trump has spent his entire life exercising his own considerable self-interest. He built a huge and admirable fortune trying to make a buck for himself.

Illustration on the rise of materialism and anti-religious bigotry on Capitol Hill by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Hate, Bernie style

Two remarkable things unfolded last week. The Democrats openly embraced socialism in the form of single-payer health care. And they announced a secular, anti-Christian test for public office. The two go together like Abbott and Costello. Or better yet, since this is far from funny, Marx and Lenin.

Illustration on CIA use of drones by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The CIA’s drones fly into a storm

The Central Intelligence Agency’s authority to use lethal force is usually discussed only in the quietest corners of the intelligence community. These authorities are usually implemented pursuant to carefully-prescribed top-secret “presidential determinations” that authorize specific actions.

Justin Kandor Causing Trouble in New Hampshire Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Some New Hampshire candor about Jason Kander

Let America Vote founder Jason Kander is a smirking menace. The former Missouri secretary of state wants to come to New Hampshire, cast aspersions on our elections, and use his wokeness as a springboard to bigger things.

George McGovern. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

The sad tale of two stumbling parties

- The Washington Times

We’ve heard the words and music of this song before. The hoariest cliche in American politics, presented as accomplished fact by every wise head in academe and media after every wipe-out election, is that the losing party is finished. Kaput. Destroyed. Done for. Dead, as in the graveyard.

Related Articles

Stem Cell Research at the NIH Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Seeking pro-life leadership at the National Institutes of Health

Dr. Francis Collins has not shown any pro-life leadership at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In fact, in an interview, Dr. Collins' response to a congressional letter outlining pro-life members' concerns dripped with condescension, implying that the group of 41 congressmen understood neither the science nor the ethics of embryo and stem cell experiments. Dr. Collins owes us an apology. We know the science, use the scientifically accurate terms and know the ethical facts. Dr. Collins' positions at NIH have not been pro-life.

A wry look at communist Cuba today

In October 2015 author Nelson DeMille and his wife toured Cuba. Mr. DeMille made good use of his field research trip and in his new action-adventure novel "The Cuban Affair" we are offered his wry observations and running commentary on Cuba via his fictional character, Daniel "Mac" MacCormick.

Screwy Wedding Cake Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cakewalk to the Constitution

The U.S. Supreme Court takes up a free-speech case in the October term, and making the right decision should be a piece of cake. The justices will be asked to decide whether the government can require someone to say something he doesn't want to say.

Government manipulating CPI?

I have been saying for 10 years that the federal government has been adjusting the consumer price index basket of goods by including more low-cost items and reducing higher-cost items. It has done this manipulation in order to minimize its obligations for payment increases by the Social Security Administration and the federal-employee retirement system.

Trump predicted own presidency

This year, Sept. 2 came and went like most days of the weekend news cycle. But I believe the entire media missed the anniversary of a significant event in American history: the 30th anniversary of the genesis of the Trump presidency.

U.S. President Donald Trump addresses the 72nd session of the United Nations General Assembly, at U.N. headquarters, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Richard Drew)

Fair warning at the U.N.

No more globaloney. That was the enduring message President Trump had Tuesday for the United Nations. He gave it to the delegates with the bark on, but tempered with just enough of the butter they're accustomed to hearing from their indulgent betters.

In this June 30, 2014, file photo, customers walk to a Hobby Lobby store in Oklahoma City. Federal prosecutors say Hobby Lobby Stores has agreed to pay a $3 million federal fine and forfeit thousands of ancient Iraqi artifacts smuggled from the Middle East that the government alleges were intentionally mislabled. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki, File)

Hey lady, raw cotton is not racist -- it's raw cotton

- The Washington Times

A new controversy has erupted in the left's ever-expanding war on racism, and this one is so ridiculous that even the left ought to be shaking heads in shame. Basically, a woman's claimed a Hobby Lobby art display of raw cotton -- comprised of a few sticks of the fiber stalks shoved into some glass jars, with the fluffy white spilling from brown branches -- is racist.

Paul Manafort wiretapped -- and suddenly, Trump's not so crazy

- The Washington Times

Paul Manafort, President Donald Trump's former campaign manager, was being wiretapped by feds -- not just once, but twice -- as part of an FBI investigation into his dealings in Ukraine and Russia. The secret surveillance took place at a time when Manafort was in contact with Trump, all the way into 2017. And with that, Trump, who claimed that his Trump Tower had been wiretapped by Barack Obama in the lead-up to the election, is suddenly no longer the crazy dude the left made him to appear.

U.S. President Donald Trump, center, gets up to leave after making a quick statement at a meeting during the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Donald Trump, the right guy to rein in the United Nations

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump took the United Nations to task in recent remarks at the global body's New York headquarters, telling those attending a special forum on "management, security and development" that the entity was in dire need of reform. It's about time America snipped the U.N.'s wings.

In this June 7, 2013, photo, the placid meadows and hills of Antietam National Battlefield in Sharpburg, Md., are a contrast with the Civil War violence that once raged across this land. So consuming is the serenity at Antietam that it can seduce you into ignoring the story of the mayhem that unfolded here on Sept. 17, 1862. (AP Photo/Cal Woodward)

Salary suspicions

Let's face it. When it comes to historical markers and monuments, especially ones related to the Civil War, we hear more about destruction than dedication these days.

The Capitol is seen at sunrise as Congress returns from the August recess to face work on immigration, the debt limit, funding the government, and help for victims of Hurricane Harvey, in Washington, Tuesday, Sept. 5, 2017. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Washington's unethical ethics watchdog

Before "fake news" there was CREW -- the ridiculously self-proclaimed Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington. This supposed government ethics watchdog has always been more of a partisan lapdog to left-leaning politicians. But now -- according to a leaked document authored by Democratic hit man David Brock -- CREW is set to dramatically expand its size and scope to be a key player in pursuit of impeaching President Trump and disrupting Republican priorities.

In Praise of Asylum Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A thank you to America

On Sept. 6 at 9:57 a.m., the U.S. government accepted my application for political asylum in the United States. I want to thank the U.S. government and the great American people for taking us into their embrace and their wings at a moment when I, along with my family, am faced with the greatest adversity of my life.

Illustration on infrastructural development in America by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Building a stronger America

The infrastructure in China is impressive. My recent visit extremely impacted my perspective on the overall transportation systems in the United States as I witness that China has a big advantage with their wonderful airports, road systems and with their unique Shanghai Maglev Train. I had the opportunity to ride on the world's fastest commercial train; it has maintained its record since 2004.