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The Second Jacksonian Revolution Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When ‘deplorables’ took back their country

The 1829 inauguration of Andrew Jackson ranks as the most raucous in American history. Presidents in those days traditionally held open house for the general public after being sworn in, but no one anticipated that hordes of Jackson’s rough-and-tumble supporters would descend on the nation’s capital for the big day or that they would troupe over to the White House following his inaugural address to shake his hand and guzzle free booze.

Growing the American Economy Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to jump-start the economy

As the presidential debates get underway, we hope that the moderators set personalities aside and spend some quality time asking questions of both candidates about their plans to grow the American economy.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump waves to the crowd during a rally in Roanoke, Va., Saturday, Sept. 24, 2016. Trump faces Democratic opponent Hillary Clinton in the first of three debates Monday.  (AP Photo/Steve Helber)

Terrorism, refugees and Donald Trump

Hilary Clinton’s refugee plan is an open invitation for Radical Islam’s unyielding nature to run roughshod over American culture.

Federal Land Grab Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Grinding westerners under the federal boot

The federal government owns an estimated one-third of all the land in the United States. But this is only a rough estimate, because even the federal government does not actually know how much land it controls.

Illustration on the contrasting media coverage of Hillary and Trump by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The apoplectic liberals

- The Washington Times

Is it journalistic malpractice to quote each side of the argument and leave it to readers to draw their own conclusions?

A study in nuclear contrast

Astudy in contrast: North Korea is killing itself to get an atomic bomb; Kazakhstan is rich because it gave its nukes away.

Charlotte police encountering protesters earlier in the week.           Associated Press photo

A riot that dares not speak its name

- The Washington Times

Charlotte is the conversation we’re getting about race in America, with rioting, death and looting, encouraged by the noise of the mob, the purple rhetoric of certain newspapers, bloody mayhem on the television screen, and encouragement, no doubt unintended, by the president of the United States. It’s a carnival out there, but not much conversation.

Illustration on two possible economic futures by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Liars, statistics and politics

This presidential season Americans have been treated to the usual outrageous campaign promises and extraordinary candidate alibis about past transgressions, but those pale in comparison to claims about gains in family incomes served up by the Obama administration last week.

Fifteen years after the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks 2,976 American flags were displayed in memory of each person who died. Families of the victims say they have waited long enough and want legislation granting them the right to sue Saudi officials who they say are culprits. (Associated Press)

Americanism over transnationalism

Throughout this presidential campaign we’ve heard many liberals and neoconservatives carp against the nationalism espoused by Donald Trump and condemn how nationalism continues to resonate among tens of millions of regular Americans. Elitists and media messengers likewise express horror when Mr. Trump announces that in all matters, be they domestic or foreign, his policy and attitude will be “America first.”

Illustration on Obama's exit before the consequences by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

War clouds are gathering

This summer, President Obama was often golfing. Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were promising to let the world be. The end of summer seemed sleepy, the world relatively calm.

FILE - In this Jan. 19, 2016 file photo, handguns are displayed at the Smith & Wesson booth at the Shooting, Hunting and Outdoor Trade Show in Las Vegas. Nearly two-thirds of Americans expressed support for stricter gun laws, according to an Associated Press-GfK poll released Saturday, July 23, 2016. A majority of poll respondents oppose banning handguns. (AP Photo/John Locher, File)

Why millennials are skeptical of gun control

For the mediaocracy and pundit class, determining the opinions of millennials on all sorts of topics is the great 21st-century parlor game. And it seems that nothing confuses them more — or upsets them, for that matter — than when forced to confront millennial attitudes about guns.

Illustration on Obama Cabinet members violations of the Hatch Act by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Partisan politics in the Cabinet

The Obama administration repeatedly allows senior officials to unlawfully meddle in politics without being held accountable. In just the latest incident, Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) Secretary Julian Castro in July was found to have violated a law designed to ensure that federal officials work on behalf of all Americans, not their political party.

Related Articles

Hillary's Economic Flatline Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Hillary chooses Obama's road to fiscal ruin

Hillary Clinton stands at a fork in the federal fiscal policy road. In one direction runs Bill Clinton's performance; in the other, Barack Obama's. Despite claiming both legacies, all indications are that Hillary is choosing President Obama's direction.

Illustration on Obama's economic legacy by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

No thank you, Obama

While touting the new Census report on income and poverty in America, Barack Obama took credit for $2 a gallon gasoline, and immodestly shouted to his crowd of supporters: "Thank you, Obama."

FILE - In this March 23, 2015, file photo, former NFL football player Darren Sharper appears in Los Angeles Superior Court. The inclusion of former NFL safety and convicted rapist Sharper on this year's list of Hall of Fame nominees has created a national outcry. Sharper, a five-time Pro Bowler, pleaded guilty in 2015 to drugging and raping up to 16 women in four states. (AP Photo/Nick Ut, Pool, File)

Darren Sharper, rape and football Hall of Fame

- The Washington Times

Darren Sharper preyed on offensive opponents on the football field. Darren Sharper preyed on women off the field. The latter is the former, and the former is the latter. Neither deserves to be in the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Boycott boycotters

In light of the recent dishonorable attacks on our national anthem by the pampered divas of professional sports, I would like to ask one question: Where is the American Legion and the Veterans of Foreign Wars?

Police need tools to do job

In my opinion, letting the police have the equipment they need to keep the population safe should be a good thing ("Donald Trump's vow to return military equipment to police jeopardizes outreach to blacks," Web, Sept. 12). If a person is not breaking the law, why would he or she need to fear the police having this equipment?

After a whirlwind trip to Mexico City Wednesday to meet Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto, Repbulican presidential candidate Donald Trump said his plans to build a border wall remain. However, Mr. Pena Nieto has vowed not to pay for its construction. (Associated press)

Something there is that likes a wall

Something was lost in the coverage when President Enrique Pena Nieto entertained Donald Trump in Mexico last month. Most of the reporters expected the two men to greet each other with baseball bats and brass knuckles and instead they established a mutual civility that is, alas, missing between Hillary and the Donald. Not paying attention to what the two presidents were saying to each other, most of the reporters missed the most important thing to come out of the meeting. "Making Mexico's borders with our friends and neighbors in Central America more secure," said President Nieto, "is of vital importance for Mexico and the United States."

More disregard for Americans

Hillary Clinton decided to expose other persons to her pneumonia, a potentially contagious disease. She demonstrated an inability to see the immorality of that decision, which could have life-threatening consequences for the young and elderly. Her statement, "I just didn't think it was going to be that big a deal," illustrates once again her contempt for the welfare of the American people. Deplorable.

Donald Trump advocates "extreme vetting" of immigrants from predominantly Muslim nations to weed out potential terrorists, coupled with aggressive coalition military operations in the Middle East. (Associated Press)

Welcome details of Trump economics

Donald Trump put some meat on the bones of his economic plan in New York on Thursday, and his plan to restore growth should mute some of his more ardent conservative critics. These critics have been playing "can you top this" with each other, vying to say the meanest things about him, and here's something positive for them to consider.

Investment Musical Chairs Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Here come the tax increases

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has pledged to enact some of the largest tax increases in modern history if elected in November. According to Mrs. Clinton's own campaign estimates, she would increase the income tax by $350 billion, implement business tax reform to the tune of $275 billion, and create a "fair share" tax surcharge on the carried interest of capital gains, which would raise taxes by between $400 billion and $500 billion.

George Washington

Hillary Clinton demonstrates the peril in running a mouth

- The Washington Times

The moving finger -- the one that having writ moved on and can't recall a single line (per Omar Khayyam's famous poem) -- is the enemy of all of us, and never more than to somebody called on to write or say something in public. We've even confiscated a word for it, "gaffe." A gaffe is not usually a mistake but what happens when someone blurts out an inconvenient truth.

President Barack Obama pauses as he speaks at the Our Ocean, One Future conference at the State Department in Washington, Thursday, Sept. 15, 2016. The conference focuses on marine protected areas, sustainable fisheries, marine pollution, and climate-related impacts on the ocean. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The weak Obama econom

The declining, perpetually weak Obama economy is nearing the end of its eighth year, a testament to his failed policies that continue to plague the American people.

Killer thriller debut in 'Nothing Short of Dying'

"Nothing Short of Dying" is probably the best debut thriller of the year -- and don't be surprised if before long Erik Storey ranks among the giants of the thriller genre.

Illustration on Hillary's advocacy of government interference with parents and children by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Children of the state

- The Washington Times

This is how deplorable Hillary Clinton thinks you are: She feels the state can better raise your children than you can.

Illustration on defending the Constitution by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

On its anniversary, the Constitution faces trouble

Americans love the underdog, because we were once underdogs ourselves. A hodgepodge group of British colonies perched on the coast of a wild, unexplored land had the guts to challenge the world's superpower -- and we won. It's a story no one would believe if it weren't written down in our history books.

In this March 1, 2016 file photo, FBI Director James Comey testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana, File)

The truth about Hillary and the FBI

The notion that FBI Director James Comey took a fall to protect Hillary Clinton for political reasons is now gaining as much traction as the claim that President Obama was not born in the United States.