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Roger Goodell. (Associated Press)

The NFL owners with a playbook of their own

- The Washington Times

The owners of the National Football League finally came up with a playbook of their own. Beset by players who want to be political commentators who work from their knees, and by angry fans who only want to watch a football game without insult to the country they love, the owners consulted their playbook and think they can run out the clock.

Illustration on the clique of dictators by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Defeating the dictators’ clique

A dictators’ clique of China, Russia, Iran and North Korea threatens democracies everywhere. They are more dangerous than any past dictators because they have or are about to have nuclear weapons and the means to deliver them. The best way for peace-loving nations to oppose these dictators is through a global coalition centered on the United States and Europe. The U.S. and European democracies led coalitions that defeated dictators in the World War I, World War II and the Cold War. They can do it again.

Illustration on police and minorities by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Deadly Democratic cities

After a speech in Middletown, Pennsylvania, this week, President Trump sat for an interview with Fox News’ Sean Hannity. No doubt it was friendly territory. For the president, Mr. Hannity’s questions were underhand softballs tossed down the center of the plate, and the replies were vintage Trump.

Illustration on the strategic importance of an independent Kurdistan by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Toward an independent Kurdistan

The autonomous Kurdistan region of northern Iraq held a referendum on independence on Sept. 25. It was overwhelmingly approved. This referendum, not surprisingly however, has precipitously raised tensions not only with Iraq but also with Turkey, Syria and Iran, all of which have large — and restive — Kurdish minorities.

Illustration on the growing accusations against men as a group for sexual misconduct by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Young men’s lives matter, too

Everybody despises Harvey. Usually by this time in the public pursuit of a villain the scoundrel begins to attract a little undeserved sympathy. Not this time. The accusers keep on coming, with the passion of Emile Zola famously accusing the French government of hounding Alfred Dreyfus — “J’ accuse!” — only because he was a Jew.

It's All About the Votes Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The Trump-McConnell detente

That was some chaotic scene in the White House Rose Garden Monday. After lunch with Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, President Trump assured combative reporters and the country that the two are getting along just fine, in spite of the Senate’s failure to repeal and replace Obamacare and an uncertain future over tax reform, the other Republican signature issue party members promised to get done.

NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell watches from the sidelines before an NFL football game between the Minnesota Vikings and Green Bay Packers in Minneapolis, Sunday, Oct. 15, 2017. (AP Photo/Bruce Kluckhohn)

NFL missed golden opportunity

- The Washington Times

Commissioner Roger Goodell emerged from a meeting with NFL players and owners and announced, indirectly, that it was still A-OK to kneel for the national anthem. “We did not ask for that,” he said, in answer to a question about whether the league would demand players stand. And in so doing, the NFL has missed a golden opportunity to soothe and calm tensions.

Illustration on Mitch McConnell by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

More than just a swamp dweller

- The Washington Times

Senate Republican Leader Mitch McConnell is regarded by most conservatives and Republicans outside Washington as the embodiment of all that’s wrong with Washington. A recent Harvard study found him the least popular of all nationally known political figures and a group of my fellow conservatives told him in an open letter that as far as they’re concerned, he is “the swamp.”

Illustration on the threat of hurricanes to the electrical grid by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Lights that a hurricane can’t blow out

With millions of Americans experiencing power outages due to catastrophic hurricanes Harvey, Irma and Maria, there has never been a more important time to look critically at the reliability and durability of our electrical grid. In Puerto Rico, which has been devastated by Hurricane Maria, reports indicate that it will take months — or even as long as a year — for the power to be fully restored.

Illustration of Fethullah Gulen by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Fethullah Gulen, a pious Muslim or a radical Islamist?

Controversial Muslim cleric Fethullah Gulen is back in the news following a diplomatic standoff between Turkey and the United States. On Oct. 8, the U.S. mission in Turkey announced a decision “to suspend all non-immigrant visa services at all U.S. diplomatic facilities in Turkey,” in retaliation for the arrest of a Drug Enforcement Administration liaison in Turkey with suspected ties to Mr. Gulen. Turkey has answered in kind by freezing the issuance of new visas.

Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash., the ranking member of the Senate Health, Education, Labor, and Pensions Committee, talks to reporters on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, Oct. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

The problem with Obamacare subsidies

Late last week, President Trump signed an executive order directing the secretaries of the Treasury and health and human services to cease making payments to health care insurance companies in behalf of the more than 6 million Americans who qualify for these payments under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, commonly known as Obamacare.

Claire McCaskill’s crusade could hurt Native American rights

Let’s establish an important legal concept and set the context. The legal term “sovereign immunity,” according to the Wex Legal Dictionary, means that “the government cannot be sued without its consent.” This doctrine has applied to the federal government, states, public universities and Native American tribes for many years.

Saving the nation from the left’s bullies

As we’ve all been understandably focused on Hollywood’s Weinstein dumpster fire, a number of stories have emerged exposing the left’s continuing culture war, despite its meltdown in the film industry.

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Illustration on pro-active measures for protecting American cybersecurity by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Russia's aggressive cyberwar

Russian President Vladimir Putin's regime has been highly aggressive in pursuing cyberwar and cyberespionage at least since its 2007 attacks on the Estonian government. The fact that it is routinely attacking U.S. defense and intelligence cyber-networks can be no surprise.

Pope Francis, left, asperges incense in front of an icon of Mary and baby Jesus as he celebrates a canonization mass for 35 new saints in St. Peter's Square at the Vatican, Sunday, Oct.15, 2017. (AP Photo/Andrew Medichini)

A step toward ending injustice in abortion

Human liberty and dignity notched a big win earlier this month. The Pain-Capable Unborn Child Protection Act is a landmark step adding further protections for the unborn by criminalizing abortions performed after 20 weeks into a pregnancy.

Illustration on the history leading up the North Korean nuclear crisis by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

How we got to a nuclear North Korea

President Trump and his Cabinet have said repeatedly that the present state of affairs with North Korea represents 25 years of American foreign policy failure going back over at least three presidents -- Bill Clinton, George W. Bush and Barack Obama. Reviewing this disaster, there are at least three major mileposts.

American Intellectual Property Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A better deal with NAFTA 2.0

America's trade negotiators are now in the process of crafting a 2.0 update of the 1994 North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Fortunately, it now appears that Donald Trump's intention on NAFTA is to mend it, not end it. The trade deal has been a stunning economic success for all three nations: Canada, Mexico and the United States. Freer trade has meant steady increases in the volume of trade, greater competitiveness and lower prices.

FILE - In this Wednesday, Sept. 20, 2017, file photo, former President Barack Obama speaks during the Goalkeepers Conference in New York. Obama is set to return to the campaign trail for the first time since he left office with a rally to help Democrat Ralph Northam in Virginia's closely watched race for governor. The Northam campaign announced Wednesday, Oct. 11, that the lieutenant governor and Obama will appear together at an event in Richmond on Oct. 19. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez, File)

The Iran nuclear agreement finally gets a skeptical eye

Maximum hot air, minimum bottom line. That's the prospect for the world over the next few weeks in the wake of President Trump's Friday declaration that he won't certify that the Islamic mullahs in Iran are living up to their end of the deal they made with Barack Obama. This was the one-sided agreement by which the mullahs would give up their quest for nuclear weapons.

In this Nov. 14, 2013, file photo, producer Harvey Weinstein attends the New York premiere of "Mandela: Long Walk To Freedom" in New York. Weinstein faces multiple allegations of sexual abuse and harassment from some of the biggest names in Hollywood. (Photo by Andy Kropa/Invision/AP, File)

Democratic politicians look for ways to express high dudgeon on the cheap

Nearly a week went by before Hillary Clinton pulled together a statement about Harvey Weinstein's abuse of women. Hillary's against abusing women and it turns out that she took so long to say so because she was trying to find the words to describe how deep her outrage runs. Abuse of women, and even credible accusations of forcible rape, are not unknown in Hillaryworld. Perhaps she hoped to draft Bubba's help to describe her outrage. Bubba's good with words. Or perhaps she was so busy tabulating good ol' Harvey's contributions to various Clinton "charities" that she just didn't get around to it sooner.

Stop ignoring founding principles

Fred Eckert's review of Charles J. Sykes' book, "How The Right Lost Its Mind" ("Conservatism betrayed," web, Oct. 9), stresses that Republicans abandoned their conservative "principles" and "truth" for "a new tribalism that valued neither." I'd say the Democrats did the same. And both parties have ignored the fundamental principles that our Declaration of Independence highlighted as "self-evident" truths 240 years ago.

Buy your own contraception

As it rejiggers Obamacare, the Trump administration has visited anew the idea that employers opposed to contraception for recreational sex as a matter of religious belief should not be forced to pay for it. Until Obamacare was forced upon an unwelcoming public by a strict party-line vote, men and the women we dated took it upon ourselves to provide the prerequisites for such recreation, including contraception.

Taking a knee no hero's move

I enjoyed reading Judge Andrew P. Napolitano's recent op-ed on the NFL and protected speech ("Taking a knee and protected speech," Web, Oct. 11). I agree with the old Beatrice Evelyn Hall quote, "I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it." However, I feel that the taking of a knee is really just egotistical grandstanding by players who make far more money than the average citizen of any skin color.

Political murders and a persistent accusation

The allegation is contained "Orders to Kill," Amy Knight's book, which is a richly detailed account of the murders of multiple Putin foes over the years, including one brazen assassination of a would-be "reformer" literally in the shadow of the Kremlin. Although evidence strongly points to President Putin as responsible for many of the killings, "Putin is never seen holding a smoking gun," as Ms. Knight writes.

This March 22, 2016, file photo shows U.S. President Barack Obama, right, and his Cuban counterpart Raul Castro wave to cheering fans as they arrive for a baseball game between the Tampa Bay Rays and the Cuban national baseball team, in Havana, Cuba. (AP Photo/Rebecca Blackwell, File)

Barack Obama should apologize for Cuba

- The Washington Times

So far, 22 American diplomats and their family members have been harmed in unexplained attacks in Cuba -- the country Barack Obama assured was our new bestie, maybe even more so than Iran. Obama needs to apologize.

Twitter, red-faced, unlocks Rose McGowan

- The Washington Times

Anybody who's ever been blocked or locked or limited by Twitter knows -- the company never explains why. It only sends a standard form memo that speaks of "violating terms of service," or some other such bland and nondescript reason. The Rose McGowan-Twitter saga has ended somewhat differently.

Illustration on the necessary nationalism of America and India by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why global leaders are putting their countries first

To anyone who listened to President Trump's speech before the U.N. General Assembly in September one thing should have been abundantly clear: The president wasn't there for anyone else's interests but America's.

Illustration on Nigerian terrorism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Thwarting terrorism in Nigeria

"If they fail to give us Biafra, Somalia will look like a paradise compared to what will happen to that 'zoo' (Nigeria)." These are the words of Nnamdi Kanu, leader of the so-called Indigenous People of Biafra (IPOB).

Illustration on trump's destructive attitude toward Republicans by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

President Trump's stalled agenda

This has been a rough week or two for President Trump. Most job approval polls are plunging, his secretary of State called him a "moron," and the Senate Foreign Relations Committee chairman says his behavior could put the U.S. "on the path to World War III."