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Apollo 11 begins the return trip to earth. Source: NASA

Getting on with getting to Mars

Forty-five years ago last summer, Neil Armstrong and I walked on the moon. Our Apollo 11 lander touched down in the moon’s “Sea of Tranquility,” and three days later we were home.

House of Cards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dreaded consequences of Obamanomics

What has been the price tag for the audacious Obamanomics experiment? How much has it all cost — the bailouts, the debt, the stimulus plans, the printing of cheap money, Obamacare and all the rest?

Liberal Bully of the Week: Emperor Obama

To quote the band Styx from the classic 1977 song “Come Sail Away”: “I tried Oh Lord I tried to carry on …” to not give the “Bully Award” to Barack Obama once again. However, I had no choice. President Obama has taken bullying to a whole new level not seen since maybe Hugo Chavez (another liberal darling).

ISIS and Obama Flags Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Sailing in uncharted Mideast waters

With an anti-war activist as commander in chief who pursues a “progressive” agenda, the result can be devastating. Clearly, the country is being led into uncharted waters. While it is a given that no president in recent history has faced the multitude of threats facing the country, most of them are a result of President Obama’s own policies. The Nov. 4 election results signal that Americans want a clear change in direction.

President Obama arrives to speak during a nationally televised address from the White House in Washington. (AP Photo/Jim Bourg, Pool)

Obama puts the cat among the pigeons

- The Washington Times

Barack Obama put the cat among the pigeons Thursday night, but he may be surprised by how big that cat could get, and with it a big cat’s appetite for more than pigeons.

Illustration on the Constitution and marriage by Linas Garys/The Washington Times

Considering the thorny question of a marriage amendment

At a time when many Republicans have embraced a “don’t ask, don’t tell” approach to same-sex marriage (“Don’t ask me what my position is because I won’t tell you”), Republican Sen. Ted Cruz of Texas has proposed a characteristically audacious solution to judicial assaults on traditional marriage: a constitutional amendment.

In this photo taken May 12, 2014, Shon DeArmon, top, and his partner James Porter carry a flag in support of the county issuing marriage licenses for same-sex couples at the Pulaski County Courthouse in Little Rock, Ark.  A 2004 amendment to the Arkansas constitution lands before two courts Thursday, Nov. 20, 2014, with the state Supreme Court and a federal judge considering separate challenges in the case. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston)

A constitutional amendment on marriage

Our nation is in the final stages of a sweeping and historic social transformation that just 10 years ago seemed improbable at best.

Gruber's Black-box Obamacare Number Cruncher Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Gruber and the shenanigans of Leviathan

Democratic politicians and the liberal media are scrambling to curtail the damage from Obamacare architect Jonathan Gruber’s proclamations on stupid voters and deceitful legislative tactics.

Illustration on the need for immigration reform by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Solving immigration, one step at a time

Republicans have no shortage of ideas for fixing America’s immigration system and no lack of good will toward those who would come here for opportunity and freedom. What we do need, urgently, is to restore the bonds of trust — between the people and their government, and between the institutions we depend on to maintain the rule of law.

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Barry Goldwater in 1965. (AP Photo)

In the beginning there was Goldwater

- The Washington Times

In a very real sense, the modern conservative political movement began with Barry Goldwater. Had it not been for the Arizona senator it might have taken years or even decades for conservative ideas to break into the political mainstream, Ronald Reagan would be remembered today not as one of our greatest presidents, but as a "B" movie star and television host, and many of those who since the 1960s shaped our nation's politics would not have had an opportunity to do so.

BOOK REVIEW: 'The Resilience Dividend'

Resilience, as defined by Judith Rodin is the capacity of any entity, ranging from an individual, a corporation or a society, to pre-emptively prepare for sudden disruptions that were unpredicted, to recover from them and then to take advantage of new opportunities produced by the disruption for further growth and expansion.

Barry Goldwater waves to delegates inside the Cow Palace at the 1964 Republican National Convention in San Francisco. As a senator, he strongly argued that it is a core American value and in the country's best interest to stand by Taiwan as it faced an existential threat from tyrannical communists. Goldwater's contribution to the U.S.-Taiwan relationship made him a figure of enormous importance and won him profound respect on the other side of the Pacific. He championed the passage of the Taiwan Relations Act (TRA), a landmark piece of legislation, which through bipartisan support, was signed into law in April 1979. To this day, that law provides the bedrock for U.S.-Taiwan relations. (Associated Press)

Goldwater: Unwavering friend of 'Free China'

Barry Goldwater is rightfully an icon of the American conservative movement for decades since the 1960s, and it is a privilege and an honor to contribute to his remembrance on the 50th anniversary of his presidential campaign. What many Americans may not know, however, is the role then-Sen. Goldwater played in the U.S. relations with my country, the Republic of China (ROC, Taiwan), usually termed by the senator as "Free China." His contribution to the U.S.-Taiwan relationship made him a figure of enormous importance and won him profound respect on the other side of the Pacific as well.

Illustration on  targeting the Washington Redskins' name by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

'Redskins' — for want of a politically correct name

Congressional Delegate Eleanor Holmes Norton, who represents the District of Columbia, has introduced a bill (H.R. 5690) that would deny federal tax-exempt status to any professional sports league that promotes the use of the term "Redskins."

Jonathan Gruber poses in his home in Lexington, Mass., in this Feb. 8, 2011, file photo. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa, File)

The stupidity of 'experts'

The only surprising thing about Obamacare architect Jonathan Gruber's revelations that the legislation was based on a series of lies and voter stupidity was that Mr. Gruber was so stupid to think no one would see the videos of him saying so.

Citizens hold signs at the Westminster Board of Health meeting on the proposed tobacco ban, at the Westminster Elementary School, Wednesday, Nov. 12, 2014, in Westminster, Ma. A public meeting on a central Massachusetts town's proposed first-in-the-nation ban on tobacco and nicotine sales ended early Wednesday because officials say the crowd was getting too unruly to continue. (AP Photo/Worcester Telegram & Gazette, Steve Lanava)

EDITORIAL: Anti-smoking fanaticism

Prohibition is back in Westminster, a rural town of about 8,000 near the New Hampshire border in north-central Massachusetts. The town's three-member board of health said it would prohibit the sale of all tobacco products within the town's borders.

Illustration on government abuse of civil forfeiture laws by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The menace of civil forfeiture

Whether your metric is the stonewalling and misleading of congressional investigations or the racially discriminatory enforcement of civil rights laws in violation of the Constitution's equal-protection principles, the Obama Justice Department is the most politicized in the nation's history.

Illustration on the real results of Obama's so-called immigration reform by Linas Garsys/The WAshington Times

Unfaithfully executing the law

President Obama is soon expected to issue an executive order that would make it possible for some illegal immigrants to live and work in this country without the threat of deportation, in effect granting amnesty to up to 5 million people.

BOOK REVIEW: 'Rebel Yell'

For two years, 1861 to 1863, Gen. Thomas Jonathan ("Stonewall") Jackson, West Point graduate, hero of the Mexican war, and in the interim a quirky eccentric former Virginia Military Institute professor plagued by a host of 19th-century afflictions, became not just a hero of the Confederacy, but a brilliant military tactician who out-thought, out-anticipated, outmaneuvered and outfought the enemy.