Political Debate - DC Debate - Washington Times
Skip to content

Opinion

Featured Articles

Tom Lever, 28, and Aaliyah Jones, 38, both of Charlottesville, put up a sign that says "Heather Heyer Park" at the base of the Confederate general Robert E. Lee monument in Emancipation Park Tuesday, Aug. 15 in Charlottesville, Va.  Alex Fields Jr., is charged with second-degree murder and other counts after authorities say he rammed his car into a crowd of counterprotesters, including Heyer, Saturday, where a white supremacist rally took place.  (AP Photo/Julia Rendleman)

The deadly impact of identity politics

In the aftermath of the horror of the Charlottesville riot, there’s been less condemnation by the media and the left of the neo-Nazi that is charged with murdering Heather Heyer and injuring at least 19 others than there has been of President Trump.

Illustration on the need for a U.S. comprehensive peace strategy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

In search of a grand U.S. strategy

Richard Nixon’s rapprochement with China, the end of the Cold War, President Obama’s outreach to “the Muslim world,” the growth of the (largely American-funded) United Nations — weren’t such developments supposed to lead to a safer world, one in which the “international community” would embrace “universal values” and pursue common interests — peace and security key among them?

Illustration on CNN and "the moron vote" by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Controversy at a pious cable news outlet

Last week CNN fired Jeffrey Lord, its famously pro-Trump contributor, for mocking an activist whom The Daily Caller has reported as a racist and an anti-Semite. Mr. Lord addressed him with the salutation, “Sieg Heil!” What is wrong with that? Is CNN covering for racists and anti-Semites?

Illustration on U.S. military involvement in Afghanistan by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

A new strategy for Afghanistan: change course, quit the fight

It has been reported in recent days that President Trump has angrily rejected the latest recommendation from his national security staff for a new Afghan war strategy. Secretary of Defense James Mattis, in other venues, has claimed the reason for the delay is that forming strategy is “hard work.”

A man casts his vote at a polling place Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, in Provo, Utah. The winner of a three-way Republican primary, Tuesday, Aug. 15, 2017, in Utah will become the favorite to win the November special election and fill the congressional seat recently vacated by Jason Chaffetz. Republicans outnumber Democrats five-to-one in Utah's 3rd Congressional District, which stretches from the Salt Lake City suburbs and several ski towns southeast to Provo and Utah coal country. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Resisting election integrity

The Election Integrity Commission will resume its work in September, now that the frivolous lawsuits against it are, one by one, being dismissed. The most recent case is in New Hampshire, where the American Civil Liberties Union has dropped a case over sharing publicly available voter information with the commission. The Granite State compromised and will comply. More states are beginning to come around.

Illustration on a possible North Korean EMP attack by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The other North Korean threat

After massive intelligence failures grossly underestimating North Korea’s long-range missile capabilities, number of nuclear weapons, warhead miniaturization, and proximity to manufacturing a hydrogen bomb, the biggest North Korean threat to the United States remains unacknowledged.

Benjamin Franklin. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A riot with an unwelcome lesson

- The Washington Times

The media mob wasted no time in descending on Charlottesville, and the first order of business was to exploit the bigotry, tragedy and evil to make it the work of the Republicans, conservatives, and above all, Donald Trump.

President Donald Trump walks across the tarmac to board Air Force One at Morristown Municipal Airport, Monday, Aug. 14, 2017, in Morristown, N.J. Trump is traveling back to Washington to sign an executive order at the White House and then later today travels to New York City. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Trump on Charlottesville: Danged if he does, danged if he doesn’t

- The Washington Times

The immediate aftermath of the widely reported Charlottesville violence wasn’t so much a media look at the issues, or the car-plowing suspect and victims, or even the demographics of the protesters — that many came from out of state to stand strong against a small-town statue of Robert E. Lee — as it was a cause to criticize President Donald Trump. But why all the angst against the president?

Illustration on white supremacist groups by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Tragedy in Charlottesville

In the South during the Jim Crow era, the “one-drop rule,” codified into law, asserted that if a person had just one drop of African-American blood, they were considered “black.” I wonder what we’d learn if we gave former KKK leader David Duke and the “white nationalists” who caused havoc in Charlottesville last Saturday a DNA test to determine their racial makeup?

Illustration on the challenge for Trump posed by North Korea by Nancy Ohanian/Tribune Content Agency

Making the best of a bad nuclear hand

- The Washington Times

That so many of the nation’s leading Democrats believe President Trump poses a greater threat to world peace than the mad dog leader of a nuclearized North Korea says more about them than either the president or Kim Jong-un.

Illustration on Kim's attachment to nuclear weapons by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

‘Juche’ or consequences

“Juche” — the ideology of North Korea — compels unquestioned obedience to the “supreme leader,” who is exalted as the greatest source of political thought. It is enforced by fear and murder even among the elite and accounts for the Kim regime’s paranoia and belligerence.

The USS Gerald Ford         U.S. Navy

‘A 100,000-ton message to the world’

As an old Navy man who served as a young enlisted sailor on the aircraft carrier USS Kitty Hawk during the Vietnam War, I was pleased and proud to see the U.S. Navy’s newest aircraft carrier, the USS Gerald R. Ford (CVN 78), join America’s fleet.

Related Articles

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell Ky. listens during a news conference on Capitol Hill Washington on Aug. 1, 2017. (Associated Press) **FILE**

An open letter to Mitch McConnell and Congress

Really, Mitch McConnell? You think President Trump has "excessive expectations" about wanting to get things done for the American people? Was seven years not enough for you and your colleagues to come up with a plan to repeal and replace Obamacare?

Russia probe may see indictments by Mueller

The grand jury is the prosecutor's best friend: If he wants to get rid of a weak, unpopular or politically incorrect situation, he does a "slow roll" to the grand jury and then says, "Well, the grand jury refused to indict," and shrugs his shoulders. The case -- and whatever controversies are associated with it -- simply goes away and the prosecutor washes his hands of it.

Illustration on sanctuary cities as hideouts by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Sanctuary cities vs. hideouts

In biblical times, a sanctuary city was a place where someone who had committed unintentional manslaughter could find refuge from "the avenger of blood." If the offender left the sanctuary city, he could be set upon by a relative of the dead person and killed. No sanctuary was available to anyone who committed murder with malice aforethought.

Illustration on U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley and the North Korean situation by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Nikki Haley -- A superstar in Donald Trump's Cabinet

Donald Trump has a skill for recruiting Cabinet officers he has treated badly. Serving in his administration can require selfless devotion to duty. Jeff Sessions, the attorney general, could tell you about that. So could Nikki Haley, the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations who is swiftly becoming the Cabinet superstar.

Illustration on the coming crisis in U.S. health care by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The coming single-payer health care system

President Trump's threat to withhold subsidies from insurance companies and congressional staff to purchase insurance will not likely result in Republicans agreeing on a plan to replace Obamacare. That sets the table for Democrats to further socialize American medicine.

A Haitian boy holds onto his father as they approach an illegally crossing point, staffed by Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers, from Champlain, N.Y., to Saint-Bernard-de-Lacolle, Quebec, Monday, Aug. 7, 2017. Seven days a week, 24-hours a day people from across the globe are arriving at the end of a New York backroad so they can walk across a ditch into Canada knowing they will be instantly arrested, but with the hope the Canadian government will be kinder to them than the United States. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

The hidden expense of fatherless families

Several years ago, my youngest son and I began a regular practice of packing several backpacks with packaged food, toiletries and small Bibles, and heading to downtown Washington, D.C. to pass them out to the homeless. Most of the people we met were men, and soon I discovered something that truly surprised me.

Acting Chief Medaria Arradondo listens during a Minneapolis City Council committee hearing Wednesday, Aug. 9, 2017, at City Hall in Minneapolis. The committee unanimously endorsed the nomination of Arradondo to become the first African-American police chief in Minnesota's largest city. The committee heard nearly two hours of public comments Wednesday from a broad cross-section of community members, who overwhelmingly supported Arradondo. (Anthony Souffle/Star Tribune via AP)

Sanctuary cities and the rule of law

Earlier this week, the Trump Department of Justice (DOJ) told the mayor of Chicago that it would cease funding grants to the Chicago Police Department that had been approved in the Obama administration because Chicago city officials were not cooperating with federal immigration officials.

Illustration on the history of preparedness for nuclear attack        The Washington Times

Reliving the nuclear worry

Intelligence reports to the effect that North Korea has produced a miniature nuclear warhead that can be placed inside its missiles jolts the historian to relive a past that most Americans don't recall.

Taking a hard look at the practices and principles of major media

Sharyl Attkisson, as The Washington Post put it, has been a "persistent voice of news-media skepticism about the government's story," as well, one might add, skepticism about the practices and principles of major media organs like The Washington Post.

No God? No morality

Your Aug. 7 editorial discusses the banality of urban murder, a sign of our secularist times ("'Nobody kill anybody,' but 'nobody' listened," Web). Regarding the epidemic of big-city violence, reference was made to the solemnity of the biblical Sixth Commandment, "Thou shall not kill," but the reality is that the other nine commandments are likewise honored mostly in the breach, in Baltimore and elsewhere. On the streets, life is cheap.

'Fire and fury' diplomacy

Though it wasn't picked up by anyone in the cowering news media, who were busy hiding under their desks when President Trump warned North Korea that if they continued with their provocation, they would face "fire and fury, the likes of which we've never seen before," Mr. Trump was actually testing a little-known theory of his.

Fans wave flags of Puerto Rico as compatriot Ivan Rodriguez speaks during his induction into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., Sunday, July 30, 2017. (AP Photo/Reed Saxon)

Cleaning up Puerto Rico's mess

Puerto Rico continues to struggle with the consequences of irresponsibly running up debt. It owes debtors about $70 billion, and a default on debt which was due to be fully repaid by last month has made things worse. The Puerto Rico Oversight, Management, and Economic Stability Act, enacted last year after President Obama and House Speaker Paul Ryan applied pressure on Congress, was supposed to prevent things like that. Instead it threatens to accelerate the rate of collapse.

In this April 6, 2017, file photo, former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton speaks during the Women in the World Summit at Lincoln Center in New York. The AP reported on Aug. 4, 2017, that a headline casting doubt on millions of votes for Clinton falsely describes the gist of a National Public Radio story published four years before the 2016 presidential election. Clinton was defeated by Donald Trump in the 2016 presidential election but won the popular vote by nearly 2.9 million votes, according to a count by the AP. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer, File)

Deeper into the swamp

Sending a defeated rival to the penitentiary is not the American way (except, maybe, in New Jersey, Illinois or Louisiana). But in a swamp there's always an alligator eager to bite off any fingers searching in the murk for the drain plug.

D.C. should focus on public health, not public hospital

- The Washington Times

If your thing is having a ring-side seat for Round 2 of the Vincent Gray-Muriel Bowser battle royale, however, start making plans. Just make sure you and your pregnant significant other also have a Plan B. That's because the District has shut down obstetric services for 90 days at United Medical Center, the lone full-service hospital on the southeast end of the District. No deliveries and no neonatal care, which can place hardship on some mothers-to-be, especially those who had planned to have their bundles of joy there.