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Huey P. Long (Associated press)

Here comes the judge

- The Washington Times

Neil Gorsuch took the best shots, such as they were, of disheartened, dismayed and despondent Democrats this week, and nobody laid a glove on him. He was as fresh when it was over as when the slugging, such as it was, began.

Working Together to Stop Nuclear Terror Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The growing threat of nuclear terrorism

The greatest challenge to global security is the nuclear threat from rogue states, led by North Korea and Iran. There will be no progress in ensuring global nuclear stability without cooperation between the United States and Russia. This should be a major priority for Presidents Trump and Putin. Much has been made of states trying to secure their borders against terrorist threats. While it is essential that borders are secured, terrorism is tackled and hatred confronted, we cannot ignore the greatest contemporary threat of all, nuclear attacks. It feels remote and unlikely, but is a very clear and present danger.

Social warriors, sometimes

- The Washington Times

Rape stories, when they can be used to vault social-justice issues into the nation’s psyche, get exhaustive coverage and opining by the mainstream media, regardless of whether they’re even true.

Refugee Comparison Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Promoting unrestricted immigration with a false equivalent

President Trump has issued a modified version of his previous immigration policy executive order that was stalled six weeks ago by a federal judge in the state of Washington. Mr. Trump has been under relentless attack from those on the left against his efforts to limit immigration from terrorist-producing areas and his call for comprehensive vetting and background checks. Beyond doubt, it is the first and most important duty of a president to protect the lives of a country’s citizens, especially where a possibility exists of terrorists being embedded within a particular immigration flow. As the president previously stated, to not strictly enforce our immigration laws is “not compassion but recklessness.”

President Trump listens as Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi speaks during a meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. In an eventful week of politics, Mr. Trump will need to restore his credibility so he can handle the next crisis, says Matt Mackowiak. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

President Trump will need to rebuild his credibility for the next crisis

While President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee held up superbly under long days of confirmation hearings questioning, and the administration and the House GOP leadership furiously worked to assemble votes for the Obamacare replacement bill, the scene at Monday’s House Intelligence Committee hearing verged on the truly incredible.

Illustration on the Class of '21 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Class of ‘21, in hot pursuit of their Brave New World

The college Class of ‘21 is racing with caught breath and trembling fingers to check their email, pick up their snail mail, and steel themselves to read those college acceptance and rejection letters. Many schools have already dispatched congrats and regrets to thousands of applicants, and the Ivies still have a week to go before they put their letters in the mail.

Illegal Voter Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

From Free State to sanctuary state

- The Washington Times

Maryland is quite a place. The state’s voters elected a Republican governor in 2014, but control remains in the hands of the same “progressives” who enjoy veto-proof majorities in both houses of the legislature on most issues. They vote as if former Gov. and presidential wannabe Martin O’Malley is still ruling the roost in Annapolis.

Henry Sanchez, 18, is one of the students charged with rape. (Associated Press)

Maryland’s ‘safe’ environment

A rough translation of Maryland’s state motto is “Strong Deeds, Gentle Words.” In the case of a 14-year-old girl who was recently raped and sodomized in a restroom at Rockville High School by two males students, both immigrants, one facing a deportation hearing, that motto in practice has been reversed.

Illustration on the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

When politicians judge jurists

I have spent this past week watching the Senate Judiciary Committee interrogating U.S. Circuit Judge Neil Gorsuch. Judge Gorsuch is President Trump’s nominee to fill the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Military Buildup House of Cards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dangers of loose talk about winning wars

On several occasions, President Trump has exclaimed that America would start “winning” its wars again. Although these seemingly sensible announcements had a pleasing resonance among the many, it overlooked the obligations of serious strategic analysis.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Democrats’ blinkered look at Gorsuch

There was a remarkable exchange between Sen. Dianne Feinstein, ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s nominee to replace Justice Scalia on the Supreme Court, during Tuesday’s confirmation hearing.

Illustration on Kim's North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s pivot to North Korea

America can do anything but America can’t do everything, at least not within a four-year time frame. That suggests that the American president — any American president — needs to prioritize.

Illustration of Chuck Brunie by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chuck Brunie, an investor exemplar

What are more important to the health of an intellectual movement, writers and academics or investors and philanthropists? That thought occurred to me when I was informed of the death of Chuck Brunie, the former longtime chairman of the board of the Manhattan Institute and the chairman emeritus of The American Spectator.

Related Articles

Trump wiretap claims? Well, Obama did secretly spy

- The Washington Times

Sen. Susan Collins, Republican from Maine, took to national television airwaves over the weekend to insist that President Donald Trump explain why he decided it was OK to accuse Barack Obama of wiretapping his conversations in Trump Tower. Here, let me help: Because Obama's White House was tapping into people all the time.

A performer dressed as Hefty Smurf gives a high-five to Jack Gall, 13, as John Gall, right, looks on at Children's Hospital in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pa. on March 17, 2017. Actor and Pittsburgh native Joe Manganiello, not pictured, visited patients the hospital with Hefty, the character he voices in "Smurfs: The Lost Village." Manganiello also hosted a screening of the film at the hospital prior to its April 7 nationwide release. Gall's father John is also pictured. (Andrew Rush/Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via AP)

Smile: The U.N. says you must

- The Washington Times

Today is the International Day of Happiness. That's according to the United Nations, which decreed the day back in 2013 and has used all its global might to enforce its provisions on an annual basis since. So go forth and be happy. Dammit.

A music fan waves a Mexican national flag during the performance of Colombian rock ban Doctor Krapula at the 18th annual Vive Latino music festival in Mexico City, Saturday, March 18, 2017. The two-day rock festival is one of the most important and longest running of Mexico. (AP Photo/Christian Palma)

Fearful Mexicans scrap Cinco de Mayo

- The Washington Times

A Cinco de Mayo celebration called El Carnaval de Puebla, held each year in Philadelphia, has just been suddenly canceled -- and in short order, it's due to President Donald Trump. The normal and usual Mexican holiday participants are worried they might get deported -- and this is a good thing.

Illustration on the Trump budget by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Striking budget gold

What hypocrites liberals and the media are. For weeks on end they've been beating up President Trump for not taking the initiative on the $10 trillion debt build-up under Barack Obama or the runaway entitlement programs that could bankrupt our nation.

Illustration on an equitable political solution for Cypress by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Turkey's vision for Cyprus

The Eastern Mediterranean is currently fraught with security challenges. Failed states, mass migration and terrorism afflict the region. Amid this turmoil, however, a golden opportunity exists to resolve one issue that has eluded a lasting settlement for decades. I am referring to the island of Cyprus. My government's vision for its future involves transforming the island into a bastion of peace, stability, cooperation and economic prosperity.

San Francisco Withdraws from the FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

San Francisco beyond sanctuary

For one big reason San Francisco stands out among the 500 cities that have declared themselves sanctuaries for illegal aliens. Others content themselves by refusing to cooperate with federal immigration enforcement agencies. About a month ago San Francisco took a big step farther by withdrawing its police from cooperation with the FBI's Joint Terrorism Task Force (JTTF).

Judge Gorsuch and the corpse flower

- The Washington Times

Every few years, the botanical garden down on the National Mall proudly boasts its prized "corpse flower." In years when our federal swamp gets hot and icky enough, the foul-smelling plant turns a throbbing purple and blooms.

"Trumpcare" needs fixing

Republicans in support of "Trumpcare" are walking on thin ice. Democrats despise the bill (no surprise there) but even Republicans, the party of the bill's origin, differ in opinion. As a member of the latter group, I say, Back to the drawing board.

President Donald Trump talks to the press corps inside Air Force One at the Palm Beach International Airport, Sunday, March 19, 2017, in West Palm Beach, Fla. Trump is returning to Washington. Standing next to Trump  is New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft.  (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

President Trump's left hand

Some of the Democrats trying to come to terms with their new home in the wilderness have chosen Ivanka, the president's accomplished daughter, as their "lifeline" to the past. They see her as the only vestige of light in an otherwise dark, alt-right Trump administration. The London Guardian says she's a "moral compass" for her father, who "might be able to rein in some of the more extreme policies of the administration."

FILE - In this Jan. 12, 2017 file photo, then-Defense Secretary-designate James Mattis listens while testifying at his confirmation hearing before the Senate Armed Services Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. In a White House with multiple competing power centers, Mattis, Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly and Joint Chiefs Chairman Joseph Dunford are emerging as a new force to be reckoned with. All three are have standing invitations to Trump's working dinners and were influential voices in Trump's decision-making process for a new national security adviser.  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)

A job for the mad dog

When James Mattis, the retired Marine general once called "Mad Dog Mattis" by his troops for his no-nonsense combat leadership, was named secretary of Defense many senior officers were encouraged to think that at last someone would put his foot down, hard, on the use of the military as a petri dish for the social experiments so beloved by Barack Obama and Ashton Carter.