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Illustration on Iranian manipulation of the U.S. by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The new Persian empire

Eleven years ago, Henry Kissinger famously said that Iran’s rulers must “decide whether they are representing a cause or a nation.” If the latter, Iranian and American interests would be “compatible.” As for the former: “If Tehran insists on combining the Persian imperial tradition with contemporary Islamic fervor, then a collision with America is unavoidable.”

Illustration on Hillary's newest book by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

‘Hillary, here is what happened’

What did I tell you? Late in November of last year, after the presidential election that finally ended the Clintons’ 24-year pursuit of power in Washington and their diminishment of the Democratic Party, I wrote that the Clintons were finished. I had consulted my sources. What is more, I reported that on election night Hillary had a “meltdown.” That is why she never showed up to thank her supporters who were milling around New York City’s Javits Center all night. Few others in the media reported it. Yet now I have still more evidence, provided by Hillary herself.

Easy Pickin's Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The real danger to U.S. national security

President Lyndon Baines Johnson (LBJ) was usually more interested in delivering tirades than seeking advice, but in February 1968 LBJ needed answers. According to Gen. William Westmoreland, the commander of U.S. Forces in Vietnam, the unanticipated Tet Offensive had transformed the Vietnam War. If LBJ wanted to win the war in Vietnam, Westmoreland and the Joint Chiefs insisted they needed 200,000 more troops.

Food as a Weapon Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How to force regime change in North Korea

With the latest provocative firing by North Korea of an ICBM missile on Sept. 14, 2017 over the Japanese island of Hokkaido, it should be clear to any thinking individual that economic sanctions will not work. We have to face facts. North Korea is doing exactly what China and Russia want it to do.

A Chinese honor guard member is caught in his flag as he stands at attention during a welcome ceremony for Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, Tuesday, Sept. 19, 2017. (AP Photo/Mark Schiefelbein)

Assessing Chinese imperialism

If you have not heard of One Belt, One Road you are missing what could be the landmark tale of this entire century. It is a saga of China’s grand strategy that could threaten American interests at every level.

Stem Cell Research at the NIH Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Seeking pro-life leadership at the National Institutes of Health

Dr. Francis Collins has not shown any pro-life leadership at the National Institutes of Health (NIH). In fact, in an interview, Dr. Collins’ response to a congressional letter outlining pro-life members’ concerns dripped with condescension, implying that the group of 41 congressmen understood neither the science nor the ethics of embryo and stem cell experiments. Dr. Collins owes us an apology. We know the science, use the scientifically accurate terms and know the ethical facts. Dr. Collins’ positions at NIH have not been pro-life.

U.S. President Donald Trump, center, gets up to leave after making a quick statement at a meeting during the United Nations General Assembly at U.N. headquarters, Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)

Donald Trump, the right guy to rein in the United Nations

- The Washington Times

President Donald Trump took the United Nations to task in recent remarks at the global body’s New York headquarters, telling those attending a special forum on “management, security and development” that the entity was in dire need of reform. It’s about time America snipped the U.N.’s wings.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of Sept. 19, 2017

What the hurricanes teach

Hurricanes Harvey and Irma were as powerful as the big South Florida hurricanes of 1926, 1928, and 1935, but the death toll was very small compared to the earlier hurricanes in the area, even though the population is now more than 10 times the size. The Great Galveston hurricane of 1900 is estimated to have cost 6,000 to 12,000 lives. The hurricanes that have hit the U.S. in the last 50 years have resulted in relatively few lives lost, with the exception of Hurricane Katrina where an estimated 1,833 died.

Duplicitous Durbin Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When Democrats try to impose a ‘religious test’

- The Washington Times

The attempted Senate mugging of Notre Dame law professor Amy Coney Barrett by Democratic Sens. Dianne Feinstein and Dick Durbin was ugly and may have amounted to an attempt to impose an unconstitutional “religious test” on a judicial nominee seeking Senate confirmation, but said more about the muggers than their intended victim.

One of 35 immigrants from 23 countries awaits the start of the naturalization ceremony that will transform them into American citizens at Northeast Jackson International Baccalaureate World Middle School in Jackson, Miss., Monday, Sept. 18, 2017. The immigrants underwent an extensive security check as well as study and testing on U.S. history, civics and government, as part of the requirements to earning citizenship documentation. (AP Photo/Rogelio V. Solis)

The ignorant nation and its legacy

At a National Archives ceremony last Friday in Washington, D.C., 30 immigrants became naturalized U.S. citizens. In a video, President Trump encouraged them to embrace the “full rights, and the sacred duties, that come with American citizenship.”

Illustration on the North Korean threat by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

There’s no easy living with a nuclear-armed North Korea

We cannot learn to live with a nuclear-armed North Korea because it is a pistol aimed at our heads by the North’s dictator Kim Jong-un, China’s dictator Xi Jinping and Russia’s dictator Vladimir Putin, that sooner or later will go off.

In Praise of Asylum Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A thank you to America

On Sept. 6 at 9:57 a.m., the U.S. government accepted my application for political asylum in the United States. I want to thank the U.S. government and the great American people for taking us into their embrace and their wings at a moment when I, along with my family, am faced with the greatest adversity of my life.

Related Articles

Illustration on Trump's recent deal with congressional Democrats by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Trump's option play

What just happened? President Trump cut a deal with Democrats to pay for hurricane damage relief and raise the debt ceiling without getting anything in return, except the temporary avoidance of a government shutdown. How to describe this? Was it a sellout, or a pragmatic act?

Satellite Defense Against Korea Missiles Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Making space for missile defense

The crisis Kim Jong-un's regime has created worsens with each intercontinental ballistic missile (ICBM) it launches and every nuclear weapon it detonates. The North Koreans are neither begging for war, as U.N. Ambassador Nikki Haley said, nor are they trying to extort money from America. This is something different.

Illustration on Hillary Clinton by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The woman scorned, opening old sores

Feminist politics turned a corner with the final defeat of Hillary Clinton. You can feel it in and between the lines of her blame-game book, "What Happened." The exuberance of her supporters, which buoyed her in the campaign to elect the first woman president, has dissipated. All she has left is a memoir of an angry woman, raging that her time has passed, that the abundant fruit of opportunity that fell from the family tree was crushed beyond hopes of redemption and there's nothing left to put in a new bottle but old whine.

Illustration on Antifa's domestic terrorism by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Antifa's 'domestic terrorist violence'

The serene, little university town of Charlottesville may have opened up a wound that will be with us for years to come. It might be more accurate to say reopened -- readers who are my age may remember the violence and destruction brought on by the anti-Vietnam War movement and Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and its companions (comrades?) on the left. Now we're seeing it again with the Antifa thugs.

Kurt Warner illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Grooming more players for the gridiron

Before Week One of the National Football League began, more than 1,100 of the best football players in the world had their dreams end as NFL teams trimmed their rosters from 90 to 53 to start the regular season. Some of those players will sign with other teams. Others have been signed to a team's practice squad, which consists of 10 spots on each team where the player can practice with the team but can't play in the game.

Bringing terror and its practitioners into focus

Al Qaeda's horrendous attacks on Sept. 11, 2001 represented a transformative moment in the history of international terrorism, with a foreign terrorist group daring to deploy its operatives from its training camps in Afghanistan to inflict catastrophic damage on its adversary's soil, and with America deciding to counter this terrorist threat with all means necessary, including pursuing such terrorists wherever they operate.

Visitors walk by the map of two Koreas at the Imjingak Pavilion in Paju, South Korea, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017. South Korea said Wednesday it conducted its first live-fire drill for an advanced air-launched cruise missile it says will strengthen its pre-emptive strike capability against North Korea in the event of crisis. (AP Photo/Lee Jin-man)

Kicking the carrot down the road

Somewhere over the rainbow, the United Nations has squeezed out another resolution ordering North Korea to be nice, to abandon its nuclear weapons, or else. Off in the great somewhere, where colors meet the clouds, there's faith that sanctions resolution No. 8 will succeed where the previous seven didn't. On the ground where reality unfolds, it's clear that only stronger medicine can cure the rogue regime of its practiced evil.

Rep. Mark Meadows, R-N.C., chairman of the conservative House Freedom Caucus, and Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, a key member of the group, walk through Statuary Hall at the Capitol in Washington, Wednesday, Sept. 13, 2017. With President Donald Trump wanting a legislative solution to replace the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, Meadows has said he will put together a working group to craft a conservative immigration plan. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

Why the debt ceiling is important

When Jack Kent Cooke fired George Allen the elder as the coach of the Washington Redskins, he remarked that "I gave George an unlimited budget and he exceeded it." George should have been a congressman.

Serbia entitled to resolution 'carrot'

David Phillips ("Why Serbia must recognize Kosovo's independence," Web, Sept. 4) presents a very distorted and immature view of Kosovo's "independence." As is common with pro-Kosovo, Albanian Western "experts" and commentators, Mr. Phillips' piece presents no carrots to Serbia and offers no long-term solutions to the conflicted region other than Serbia giving up the spiritual Jerusalem of its Orthodox-Christian Serbs, who have resided there for over 1,300 years.

Left still puts party before nation

The U.S. economic boom is alive and well -- and expanding. As Stephen Moore ("The Trump boom arrives," Web, Sept. 10) aptly notes, it is undeniable and improving at a quickening rate. Plus, it's happening despite global distractions.

President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

Trump sets clock for tax reform with unexpected move

The combination of the debt ceiling and the continuing resolution made it combustible, with the political reality that the party in power will be held responsible for keeping government open and functioning, particularly in the aftermath of a major natural disaster.

Seattle Storm fans and others cheer at a rally in support of Planned Parenthood before a WNBA basketball game between the Storm and the Chicago Sky on Tuesday, July 18, 2017, in Seattle. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Satanists and Planned Parenthood -- a match made in hell

- The Washington Times

Missouri has seen a resurgence of abortion clinics of late, thanks in large part to concerted pressures from Planned Parenthood, which sued -- successfully -- to overturn state laws requiring medical providers performing the procedure to be possessed of hospital admission privileges. And, thanks to the Satanic Temple.

President Donald Trump waits outside the West Wing of the White House for the arrival of Malaysian Prime Minister Najib Razak, Tuesday, Sept. 12, 2017, in Washington. ESPN distanced itself from anchor Jemele Hill's tweets one day after she called Trump "a white supremacist" and "a bigot."  (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Quack attack: 27 psychiatrists pen anti-Trump book

- The Washington Times

Real psychiatrists are probably squirming in their office chairs at this -- but 27 of their professional colleagues have come together to write a book about President Donald Trump. Surprise, surprise, they find: Trump's an "antisocial" idiot with "malignant narcissism," and he's going down -- big time. And this is such a surprise because Trump, as these quack analysts acknowledge, isn't even their patient.

In this Sept. 6, 2017, photo, House Speaker Paul Ryan of Wisconsin, right, arrives for a meeting with House Republicans on Capitol Hill in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin) ** FILE **

Paul Ryan tips RINO: Nobody really wants a wall

- The Washington Times

Speaker Paul Ryan reportedly said during a private dinner earlier this year that nobody but nobody in Congress wanted a border wall -- well, nobody except "one member," Breitbart reported, citing a one-on-one with the former congressman, Tom Tancredo. And with that, the establishment raises its head once more.