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President Trump listens as Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi speaks during a meeting in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington. In an eventful week of politics, Mr. Trump will need to restore his credibility so he can handle the next crisis, says Matt Mackowiak. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci, File)

President Trump will need to rebuild his credibility for the next crisis

While President Trump’s Supreme Court nominee held up superbly under long days of confirmation hearings questioning, and the administration and the House GOP leadership furiously worked to assemble votes for the Obamacare replacement bill, the scene at Monday’s House Intelligence Committee hearing verged on the truly incredible.

Illustration on the Class of '21 by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The Class of ‘21, in hot pursuit of their Brave New World

The college Class of ‘21 is racing with caught breath and trembling fingers to check their email, pick up their snail mail, and steel themselves to read those college acceptance and rejection letters. Many schools have already dispatched congrats and regrets to thousands of applicants, and the Ivies still have a week to go before they put their letters in the mail.

Illegal Voter Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

From Free State to sanctuary state

- The Washington Times

Maryland is quite a place. The state’s voters elected a Republican governor in 2014, but control remains in the hands of the same “progressives” who enjoy veto-proof majorities in both houses of the legislature on most issues. They vote as if former Gov. and presidential wannabe Martin O’Malley is still ruling the roost in Annapolis.

Henry Sanchez, 18, is one of the students charged with rape. (Associated Press)

Maryland’s ‘safe’ environment

A rough translation of Maryland’s state motto is “Strong Deeds, Gentle Words.” In the case of a 14-year-old girl who was recently raped and sodomized in a restroom at Rockville High School by two males students, both immigrants, one facing a deportation hearing, that motto in practice has been reversed.

Illustration on the confirmation of Neil Gorsuch by M. Ryder/Tribune Content Agency

When politicians judge jurists

I have spent this past week watching the Senate Judiciary Committee interrogating U.S. Circuit Judge Neil Gorsuch. Judge Gorsuch is President Trump’s nominee to fill the vacancy on the U.S. Supreme Court.

Military Buildup House of Cards Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

The dangers of loose talk about winning wars

On several occasions, President Trump has exclaimed that America would start “winning” its wars again. Although these seemingly sensible announcements had a pleasing resonance among the many, it overlooked the obligations of serious strategic analysis.

Supreme Court Justice nominee Neil Gorsuch testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 22, 2017, during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Judiciary Committee. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)

Democrats’ blinkered look at Gorsuch

There was a remarkable exchange between Sen. Dianne Feinstein, ranking member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, and Judge Neil Gorsuch, President Trump’s nominee to replace Justice Scalia on the Supreme Court, during Tuesday’s confirmation hearing.

Illustration on Kim's North Korea by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Trump’s pivot to North Korea

America can do anything but America can’t do everything, at least not within a four-year time frame. That suggests that the American president — any American president — needs to prioritize.

Illustration of Chuck Brunie by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Chuck Brunie, an investor exemplar

What are more important to the health of an intellectual movement, writers and academics or investors and philanthropists? That thought occurred to me when I was informed of the death of Chuck Brunie, the former longtime chairman of the board of the Manhattan Institute and the chairman emeritus of The American Spectator.

Illustration on the sixty vote threshold rule in the Senate by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

The pernicious no-debate filibuster

As habitually practiced since only the mid-1990s, by doing absolutely nothing, with almost no accountability accruing to them (using the “no-debate stealth filibuster”), the minority in the U.S. Senate can easily — and nearly always — either stop every legislative effort from even coming to the floor, or far more insidiously, sabotage it.

White House press secretary Sean Spicer speaks to the media during the daily press briefing at the White House, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Washington. Spicer discussed healthcare, immigration, and other topics. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Fake legal standing

The Hawaii federal court’s recent nationwide block of President Trump’s new executive order on immigration is troubling. The court’s decision turns on its head the important requirement that persons have legitimate “standing” to invoke the power of the federal courts.

Unanswered Questions in the Mideast Conflicts Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A slippery slope in Iraq and Syria

The good news is various forces are attacking ISIS (the Islamic State) and its control of territory is weakening. But as it does, historical adversaries are converging on the battlefield and American troops are standing between them in ever-increasing numbers. What began as limited airstrikes has become an American ground presence. Changes begun in the previous administration continue in the current one.

Energy Industry Red Tape Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Declaring energy independence

The United States is about to reach a major energy milestone. A new government report predicts that the nation is on track to become a net energy exporter within the decade.

President Donald Trump speaks at the National Republican Congressional Committee March Dinner at the National Building Museum, Tuesday, March 21, 2017, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik) ** FILE **

The Trump budget and Big Bird

The liberal fainting couch continues to get a workout. Since President Trump announced his budget last week, the poor liberal base has been pummeled with hysterical headlines announcing Mr. Trump’s desire to destroy the Meals on Wheels program. Once he’s done with that, he’ll murder Big Bird. And then after that, the evil and depraved genius has figured out how to completely eradicate all the “arts” in America.

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Senate Armed Services Committee Chairman Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., left, confers with the committee's ranking member, Sen. Jack Reed, D-R.I., on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March, 14, 2017, prior to the start of the committee's hearing on the investigation of nude photographs of female Marines and other women that were shared on the Facebook page "Marines United."  (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)

John McCain's jump the shark moment

- The Washington Times

Sen. John McCain, the Republican from Arizona, apparently facing a brief lull in all the television interviews he's given lately to attack President Donald Trump, took to the Senate floor to deliver a scathing verbal assault on a fellow senator, another Republican, this one, Rand Paul from Kentucky.

Lying Congress and the lying anti-repealers

- The Washington Times

Congress isn't going to repeal Obamacare. That whole Republican-driven mantra that's been making the media wave since 2010 -- the one that blasted Barack Obama as a socialist for signing government health care into law and that vowed a concerted fight for repeal? Bunk. Bull. Boldface lie.

Trump Budget Ax Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Seizing a historic opportunity

President Trump presents his first budget to Congress on Thursday. It is, as The Washington Post points out, "historic" because if adopted, it would be the biggest contraction in the federal government since the end of World War II. Predictably, a Post story focuses on the number of federal workers it estimates could lose their jobs, rather than on whether those jobs and the programs associated with them are necessary.

Illustration on an American/Saudi Arabian alliance against Iranian hegemony by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

The resetting of U.S.-Saudi relations

Saudi Arabia's Deputy Crown Prince Muhammad bin Salman arrived in Washington this week to meet with President Trump and his team and to reset the U.S.-Saudi relationship, which hit an all-time low during the Obama administration.

Former U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor at the Capitol in Phoenix Wednesday, March 15, 2017. O'Connor, who served in the Arizona state Senate as a member and majority leader from 1969 until she because a state court judge in 1973, was honored for her work promoting civics education. (AP Photo/Bob Christie)

Madison's principles on trial

James Madison, the author of the Bill of Rights, once said that "[g]overnment is instituted to protect property of every sort. This being the end of government, that alone is a just government which impartially secures to every man whatever is his own."

President Donald Trump speaks during a rally Wednesday, March 15, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

The scorning of Moscow

A fog has descended on American political life, and it is rather hard for the average citizen to understand what is going on. The mainstream media are daily clamoring for more heads to roll in the administration and for independent investigations to be launched amid allegations of collusion between Donald Trump's campaign team and the Kremlin, for which the hacking of the Democratic National Convention server is highlighted as one of the presumed "smoking guns."

Illustration on campus culture by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When the violent campus reflects a sordid culture

Middlebury College, a symbol of violent rioting in the name of tolerance, is easy to scorn and disdain. Nice boys and girls, sons and daughters of nice moms and dads, get caught acting out on intolerant impulses, and a "disturbance" sends a professor to the hospital. (At Ole Miss this would be called a "riot.")

Addressing the use of force by innocent civilians

What justifies the use of lethal force in self-defense? On the surface, it seems to be a simple concept, particularly to laymen; but the question is one of the most complex and thorny legal issues that prosecutors and courts of law can deal with.

FILE - This Feb. 13, 2017, aerial file photo, shows a site where the final phase of the Dakota Access pipeline is taking place with boring equipment routing the pipeline underground and across Lake Oahe to connect with the existing pipeline in Emmons County near Cannon Ball, N.D. Federal Judge James Boasberg on Tuesday, March 14 denied a request by the Standing Rock and Cheyenne River Sioux to stop oil from flowing while they appeal his earlier decision allowing pipeline construction to finish. (Tom Stromme/The Bismarck Tribune via AP, File)

Tubes, tunnels, pipelines and progress

The Dakota Access Pipeline that triggered the resistance of the Indians, or Native Americans as some of them want to be called, is nearly complete and ready to take oil to the refineries. The Keystone XL Pipeline project, which endured an on-again, off-again status during the Obama years, is on again. It's a new day for energy in America.

Tennessee Gov. Bill Haslam, right, waits for Air Force One with President Donald Trump aboard, to arrive Wednesday, March 15, 2017, in Nashville, Tenn. Trump is scheduled to visit the home of President Andrew Jackson and later in the day speak about health care at a rally. (AP Photo/Mark Zaleski)

Health care in the balance

Lost in the partisan bluster and shouting about the future of Obamacare, and the Republican "repeal and replace" reform, is the stark reality that the nation has arrived, finally, at the point where it must decide what kind of health care it wants, and how to pay for it.

Remove state-line limitation

To the majority in Congress: Please explain why you have not already produced a one-page bill to remove the federal limitations on selling health insurance across state lines. It remains a mystery why this is not a part of the current Republican health-care proposal, and even more why it has not already been done as a separate item. With not even an attempt to tell us why we are still waiting for it, the current majority in Congress appears to once again be the gang that can't (or is it won't?) shoot straight. You've got a lot of explaining to do.

Free speech means tolerance

As a professor, I was shocked to read the article detailing how a mob prevented free speech at Middlebury College and injured a professor there ("Middlebury College professors stand up for free speech after Charles Murray debacle," Web, March 8). The essence of democracy is the free exchange and expression of ideas. Democracies require educated citizens to thrive and a significant portion of that education entails being exposed to differing points of view.

MSNBC'S  Joe Scarborough predicted on Friday, Jan. 27, 2017, that President Donald Trump will be "crushed" by the media unless his administration changes its behavior towards journalists. (MSNBC screenshot)

Thank you, MSNBC: First Maddow, now Scarborough, lots of LOLs

- The Washington Times

MSNBC, fresh off a red face from Rachel Maddow TV revelations that were tantamount to reporting, "hey, President Donald Trump paid his taxes," apparently tried a bounce-back of sorts with another host, Joe Scarborough, who attempted to prove his mettle by taking on a Top Trump Dog, attorney Michael Cohen, via Twitter. And in social media lingo? LOL.