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People cry after a vigil in Albert Square, Manchester, England, Tuesday May 23, 2017, the day after the suicide attack at an Ariana Grande concert that left 22 people dead as it ended on Monday night. (AP Photo/Emilio Morenatti)

Another lesson from Manchester

After the horrific carnage unleashed by the terrorist attack in Manchester, England, some of the reactions were inexplicable. We’re used to jihadis celebrating the horror of mass murder, but it’s still perplexing to hear Western leaders and media reissue their bizarre insistence that we need to get used to the sick and depraved.

Illustration of Roger Ailes    The Washington Times

Roger Ailes’ exit, stage right

A major threat to the predominance of the Kultursmog in these United States passed away last week, but he had succeeded in what he set out to do, namely: to damage the left in America beyond any hope of recovery. Not many people recognize this, but it is nonetheless true.

Illustration on Turkish security attacks on American protesters in Washington, DC by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

When armed thugs come to town

Two times in two years, Turkish President Reycep Tayyip Erdogan visited our nation’s capital, and two times in two years his armed thugs attacked peaceful people on our streets. This time, his people sent nine Americans to the hospital.

Illustration on the benefits of biofuel by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Cultivating homegrown energy solutions

With all the publicity around fracking, it’s easy to assume that America’s own domestic oil production is more than enough to fuel a growing economy. It certainly helps. But there’s no magic bullet that will ensure long-term American energy security.

Go player Ke Jie, center, speaks at a press conference after playing a match against Google's artificial intelligence program, AlphaGo, during the Future of Go Summit in Wuzhen in eastern China's Zhejiang Province, Tuesday, May 23, 2017. Ke Jie, the world's top-ranked Go player, started a three-round showdown on Tuesday against AlphaGo, which beat a South Korean Go master in a five-round showdown last year. (AP Photo/Peng Peng)

The great crawl of China

The world has watched with amazement as China sprints toward its goal of becoming an advanced economy. Average annual gross domestic product (GDP) growth of 10 percent over the last 20 years has raised hundreds of millions of its citizens out of poverty and transformed China into an economic powerhouse.

State Licensing is a Roadblock to Success Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Thriving without a license

What do auctioneers, butter tasters, florists, hair braiders, makeup artists and taxidermists all have in common? They need permission from the government, in the form of an occupational license, to do their jobs.

President Trump. (Associated Press) ** FILE **

A boffo performance on the road

- The Washington Times

The Donald finally catches a break. His trip to the Middle East was planned weeks ago, long before the sacking of James Comey and the media transformation of the voluble sackee from goat to hero. The opportunity to get out of Dodge arrived just in time.

Chart to accompany Rahn article of May 23, 2017

Population death spiral

It is hard to succeed if everyone is leaving. Some of the former communist countries are suffering from a population death spiral, with double-digit population declines over the last 25 years, as can be seen in the enclosed table.

In this May 18, 1971 file photo, political consultant Roger Ailes, who died last week, is shown in his office in New York. From communications guru and TV producer to Chairman-CEO of Fox News Channel, Ailes' used a "fair and balanced" branding approach, targeted at viewers who believed other cable-news networks, and maybe even the media overall, displayed a liberal tilt from which Fox News delivered them with "unvarnished truth." Associated Press photo

The genius of Roger Ailes

Roger Ailes was no genius, not in the league of Stephen Hawking and Albert Einstein. The founding chairman of Fox News Channel, who died last week from complications after suffering a fall, understood and respected Middle America from whence he came.

Illustration on the notion of government subsidy of nuclear power by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Why nuclear power subsidies must end

Should utility bills and taxes be used to subsidize money-losing nuclear power plants so they can compete with renewable energy and low-cost natural gas?

Even the Walls have Ears Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A conversation with Condoleezza Rice

On Wednesday, I sat down with former Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice to discuss her new book, “Democracy: Stories From the Long Road to Freedom.” The following transcript has been edited for length and clarity.

Un-Happy Meal From High Minimum Wage Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

How a CEO misapprehends the minimum wage

Last week, Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg made headlines for her Mother’s Day post calling for a minimum wage increase. “It’s long past time,” she claimed, “to raise the federal minimum wage.”

Related Articles

Cadet Drew Borinstein, right, the valedictorian of the VMI Class of 2017, is congratulated after taking the oath of office as a Marine on Monday, May 15, 2017 in Lexington, Va.  In August, Borinstein's mother, brother and sister were killed in an airplane crash near Fredericksburg while on the way to watch him graduate from an officer training program. The tragedy followed the unexpected death of his father 16 months earlier. Borinstein soldiered on at VMI, completing his academic work with honors while preparing for the military.   (Stephanie Klein-Davis /The Roanoke Times via AP)  /The Roanoke Times via AP)

Sexual confusion in the colors

Patriotism is the old-fashioned path to celebrity. These days just acting out can punch the ticket to fame, if not fortune. Just ask Bradley Manning, aka Chelsea Manning, the American soldier who sold out his country, then his manhood -- not necessarily in that order — to WikiLeaks. He/she emerges from prison Wednesday through the intercession of Barack Obama, but the United States will pay the price for the treachery he/she flaunted if the military risks a repeat.

President Donald Trump watches Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan depart the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 16, 2017. The White House defended Trump's disclosure of classified information to senior Russian officials as "wholly appropriate," as Trump tried to beat back criticism from fellow Republicans and calm international allies increasingly wary about sharing their secrets with the new president. (AP Photo/Pablo Martinez Monsivais)

Settling the voter-fraud debate

President Trump made good last week on a promise to create a Presidential Commission on Election Integrity, and surely this was a promise kept that everyone could applaud. Who but cheats and frauds doesn't like clean elections? Who doesn't want his vote to count, and his vote not be canceled by someone ineligible to cast a ballot? This was something that would surely warm hearts at the Brennan Center for Justice and at the League of Women Voters.

President Donald Trump listens as Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan speaks in the Roosevelt Room of the White House in Washington, Tuesday, May 16, 2017. The White House on Tuesday defended President Donald Trump's disclosure of classified information to senior Russian officials as "wholly appropriate," as Trump tried to beat back criticism from fellow Republicans and calm international allies increasingly wary about sharing their secrets with the new president. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

How Russians helped Trump win the election is never explained

Hey, Media Matters, I'm talking to you! Help me out, here, willya'? Actually, I'll talk to anyone, listen to anyone. You'll find my email address at the bottom of this column, so hit me up. I'm asking -- no, begging -- you to write me and answer this one simple question: How did the Russians help Donald Trump become President Trump?!

Miss District of Columbia USA Kara McCullough, center, reacts with fellow contestants after she was crowned the new Miss USA during the Miss USA contest Sunday, May 14, 2017, in Las Vegas. (AP Photo/John Locher)

Miss USA changes tune, calls health care 'a right'

- The Washington Times

Well, that didn't last long, did it? Social media had been afire with news of the newest Miss USA, black Washington, D.C., representative Kara McCullough, and her conservative viewpoints -- most particularly, the one that went like this: Health care is not a right, but rather a privilege. Fast-forward a few short hours and her mantra now goes: Oops. My bad. I meant health care is indeed a right.

In this Feb. 5, 2016, file photo, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange speaks from the balcony of the Ecuadorean Embassy in London. Two media reports say U.S. prosecutors are preparing or closely considering charges against the anti-secrecy group WikiLeaks, including  Assange, for revealing sensitive government secrets. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth, File) **FILE**

Seth Rich, killed DNC staffer, emailed WikiLeaks? Ruh-roh

- The Washington Times

Rod Wheeler, a former homicide detective with the Washington, D.C., force -- whose face was made famous while serving as a television pundit during the O.J. Simpson trial -- offered up some interesting news about the recently murdered Democratic National Committee staffer Seth Rich that went like this: He was "absolutely" emailing WikiLeaks. Ruh-roh.

People protest the appearance of Breitbart News editor Milo Yiannopoulos on Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2017, in Berkeley, Calif. The University of California at Berkeley is bracing for major protests Wednesday against Yiannopoulos, a polarizing Breitbart News editor, on the last stop of a tour aimed at defying what he calls an epidemic of political correctness on college campuses. (AP Photo/Ben Margot)

At UCSC, throw the black activist bums out!

- The Washington Times

Radical black students who are part of "The African/Black Student Alliance on the University of California's Santa Cruz recently stormed one of the campus buildings, tossed out staffers and set up camp, announcing intent to stay unless their list of special interest demands were met. So why were they rewarded, rather than expelled?

Chart to accompany Rahn article of May 16, 2017

The problem of European divergence

Despite the attempts to unify Europe into an economic and partial political whole over the past 70 years, the grand experiment is unraveling, and it increasingly looks like the Humpty Dumpty we call Europe cannot be put back together again. Parts of Europe are enjoying unparalleled freedom and prosperity, but other parts are sinking both economically and politically. What explains the growing divergence?

This handout photo released by the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, shows President Donald Trump meeting with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov in the Oval Office of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, May 10, 2017. The Washington Post is reporting that Trump revealed highly classified information about Islamic State militants to Russian officials during a meeting at the White House last week. The newspaper cites current and former U.S. officials who say Trump jeopardized a critical source of intelligence on IS in his conversations with the Russian foreign minister and the Russian ambassador to the U.S. They say Trump offered details about an IS terror threat related to the use of laptop computers on aircraft.(Russian Foreign Ministry via AP)

Paying a price for presidential insults

During an interview last June in his New York office, I asked Donald Trump about his use of language that many considered insulting and divisive. "Will there be a pivot for you from the primaries to the general election campaign?"

Unfair Competition Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Ensuring 'Open Skies' still flies

As President Reagan's former transportation secretary, it's gratifying to see Washington is finally finding the gas pedal when it comes to infrastructure. We all have seen the cost of poor infrastructure, slowing down both us and U.S. businesses. But while we work ourselves out of a backlog of technology, concrete and steel problems, it's also time for Congress and the administration to cast a critical eye toward the operational risks facing our infrastructure.

Illustration on the urgency of dealing with the North Korean threat by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Writing a new chapter in the saga of North Korea

After nine years of a conservative government, the South Korean people have elected a progressive Democratic Party president, Moon Jae-in. There is significant media speculation about President Moon, the former chief of staff of former President Roh Moo-hyun, and whether he will pursue another Sunshine Policy of reconciliation with North Korea.

Illustration on the selection of the next director of the FBI by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Turning the FBI fiasco into a victory

- The Washington Times

CBS "Late Show" host Stephen Colbert, a major league anti-Trump media star, was taken aback when, upon hearing that FBI Director James Comey had been fired, his audience broke into cheers and wild applause.

Illustration on cutting loose from the Paris climate agreement by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

Deep-sixing the Paris Agreement

You wouldn't think Al Gore and Donald Trump would have much to talk about, given their political divisions. Yet that's exactly why the former vice president recently got in touch with President Trump: to urge him not to withdraw from the Paris Agreement.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of Calif. speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, May 4, 2017. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh) ** FILE **

In search of a really, really big catastrophe

- The Washington Times

If you're a Democrat, lost in a restoration fantasy of taking over the Congress next year, now is the time to dream big. Reality, with its talent for smashing the fanciful, will arrive soon enough.

Illustration on the pay gap issue by Mark Weber/Tribune Content Agency

The credibility gap on the pay gap

Some myths never die. Like Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster, the executive and gender pay gaps continue to deceive.

When tragedy becomes mystery

Do not confuse this cracking good detective story with the currently available ghost story, "Lincoln in the Bardo," which I am neither reviewing nor reading.