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Safety of Chromium-6 Levels in North Carolina Illustration by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Exaggerating chromium risks

Constant claims, counterclaims and accusations about coal ash contaminating surface and underground water are making North Carolinians feel like they’re watching a fast-paced tennis match. Even people with chemistry degrees must feel bewildered by assertions that parts per million or billion of chromium-6 may cause cancer.

Growing the Movement with Hate Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Black Lives Matter’s hypocritical anti-Semitism

In its new platform, Black Lives Matter (BLM) has, despite the total lack of relevance to its own agenda or interests, thrown whatever heft it has behind the anti-Semitic movement to Boycott, Divest, and Sanction (BDS) Israel. In doing so, it is inarguably contributing to the campaign to “other” the world’s only Jewish state and, with it, the Jews themselves.

Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe (Associated Press)

Virginia’s McAuliffe is for losers

All the fuss about Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe trying to restore voting rights to felons who have served their sentences is just fuss, nothing more. To be sure, it appears at first glance that the chief executive of the Old Dominion is really concerned about civil rights for the downtrodden.

Terrorists Present in the U.S. Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

No plan to stop foreign-born terrorists

For decades, foreign-born Islamic terrorists have been exploiting our immigration system. Almost every type of immigration has been exploited by terrorists, from temporary legal immigration to illegal immigration to humanitarian immigration.

Overheated concern about July’s warmth

Mainstream media report that July was the “hottest” month since 1880 (or as CNN wrongly reported, “ever”). And future Julys will only become hotter.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton speaks in Scranton, Pa. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster, File)

For sale, the most brazen president money can buy

- The Washington Times

It’s coming clear now why Hillary Clinton wanted her own email server, free from oversight by anyone, and why she resisted so ferociously enabling anyone from getting even a hint to what she was hiding. Her presidency, if there is one, has been sold, and a new batch of emails pried out of the government by Judicial Watch reveals the going rate for Hillary.

Gen. Jack Vessey Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A soldier’s soldier

Until he died last week at 94, former Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Gen. John W. Vessey Jr. was a living memorial to an earlier America — where God and country were not seen as contradictions, where faith formed the bedrock of personal and national character.

Defining alcohol consumption down

With summer vacation drawing to a close, many parents are eager to pop a bottle of bubbly in celebration.

Russian President Vladimir Putin. **File (Alexei Nikolsky/Sputnik, Kremlin Pool Photo via AP)

Imperial dreams

Historically, the West has faced an existential threat from both the Persian and Russian empires. The Persian Empire was fueled by the expansionist dreams of Darius and Xerxes, foiled only by the heroism of the Greeks, led by men like Themistocles.

Illustration on Republican support for Hillary Clinton over Donald Trump by Alexander Hunter/The Washington Times

What Republican turncoats forget

I asked a successful businessman the other day what he thought about Donald Trump. He turned his thumb down. Wow. Are you going to vote for Hillary? I asked with trepidation. “Of course not,” he replied almost insulted by the question. “I understand the concept of a binary decision.”

Illustration on the virtues of coal bed methane energy by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Good news for the energy industry

While the price of oil may be beginning to climb up a bit these days, we hope it has at least seen the bottom. The devastating effect of oil prices on cities, companies and workers cannot be overstated. The energy industry needs some good news. And they may found it. Coal bed methane (CBM) is a clean and renewable energy source that most people have never heard of.

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton talks with students as she tours classrooms at John Marshall High School in Cleveland, Wednesday, Aug. 17, 2016, before participating in a campaign event. Standing behind Clinton at right is Eric Gordon, Chief Executive Officer, Cleveland Metropolitan School District, and David Quolke, President, Cleveland Teachers Union, second from right. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Awaiting a second ‘Dear Hillary’ letter

One constant in the education world over the past 25 years has been the periodic release of reports warning that American workers will be unable to compete in the global economy unless education becomes a seamless web of government-managed workforce preparation. Think Common Core State Standards (CCSS), most recently.

President Barack Obama is seated in the presidential vehicle as his motorcade leaves after playing a round of golf at Farm Neck Golf Course in Oak Bluffs, Mass., on Martha's Vineyard, Thursday, Aug. 18, 2016. (AP Photo/Manuel Balce Ceneta)

The humiliation of a president

- The Washington Times

“We do not pay ransom. We didn’t here, and we won’t in the future.” Barack Obama might like to have that one back this morning, to stick a pin in the moving finger that writes. But the finger done writ, and it won’t come back to cancel a single line of the president’s fatuous fib that the United States didn’t pay $400 million to ransom four hostages taken by the president’s friends in Tehran.

Illustration on justice reform by Linas Garsys/The Washington Times

Out front on justice reform

Most of the discussion on justice reform efforts focuses on federal legislation. Indeed, several bills with bipartisan support in both the House and the Senate would aid in safely reducing the federal prison population and addressing the revolving door of incarceration. And while justice reform advocates are frustrated that these bills have yet to come to a vote, focusing all the attention on the Hill misses the forest for the trees.

Related Articles

Trump dangerous for America

There is an urgency facing this nation: Donald Trump is the Republican presidential nominee, but certain Republican leaders have failed to step up to the plate and address Mr. Trump and his followers. Republican leaders such as Sen. John McCain and House Speaker Paul Ryan are putting their love of power before country. And it's a shame, considering that they both clearly love America.

Better of two choices

American citizens should vote for Donald Trump. It's pretty clear that the Republican establishment is going all out against him. They're throwing the kitchen sink — and anything else they can grab — at him. They're attacking him, discrediting him and accusing him of all sorts of malfeasance. They're deliberately trying to turn the public against him.

FILE -- This undated image posted online on July. 28, 2016, by supporters of the Islamic State militant group on an anonymous photo sharing website, shows Syrian citizens gathered near burned cars after airstrikes hit Manbij, in Aleppo province, Syria. Syrian activists and state media said Sunday, Aug. 14, 2016, that at least 49 civilians, among them 5 children, have been killed on Saturday in Syria's contested Aleppo province as rebels and government forces traded indiscriminate fire across the region. Rebels and pro-government forces are battling for control of the northern metropolis, once Syria's largest city and its commercial capital. (Militant Photo via AP, File)

Extermination in Aleppo

An epic battle continues for control of Syria's largest city, once a rival of Cairo and Istanbul as a center of urban culture and civilization in the Middle East. Aleppo, once the Western terminus of the Silk Road from China, is swiftly becoming the latest symbol of man's inhumanity to man.

Extermination in Aleppo

The Washington Times

An epic battle continues for control of Syria's largest city, once a rival of Cairo and Istanbul as a center of urban culture and civilization in the Middle East. Aleppo, once the Western terminus of the Silk Road from China, is swiftly becoming the latest symbol of man's inhumanity to man.

In this Dec. 13, 2013 photo, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie reacts to a question during a news conference in Trenton, N.J., A former aide to Christie texted to a colleague that the New Jersey governor "flat out lied" during the news conference about the George Washington Bridge lane-closing scandal, according to a new court filing. (AP Photo/Mel Evans)

Nannies gone wild

"Multi-tasking" is the current fad word for "trying to do two things at once." Some folks are against it. New Jersey, which doesn't think Jersey guys are smart enough to pump gasoline into their own cars, now wants to make a misdemeanor of drinking coffee while driving.

Nannies gone wild

The Washington Times

''Multi-tasking" is the current fad word for "trying to do two things at once." Some folks are against it. New Jersey, which doesn't think Jersey guys are smart enough to pump gasoline into their own cars, now wants to make a misdemeanor of drinking coffee while driving.

Threat to U.S. From Political Correctness Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

A snapshot of modern madness

Two recent news items provide a glimpse of life in modern America. One is about the growth of the federal government and the other is about the evils of "profiling."

John Kerry Capturing Air Conditioners Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

When energy efficiency rules aren't cool

At an environmentalist conference in Vienna, U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry recently compared the environmental damage done by air conditioners and refrigerators to the threat of terrorism and the Islamic State.

Russia-Turkey Relations Illustration by Greg Groesch/The Washington Times

Dealing in deception

Autocracies and other despotisms are notoriously unfaithful to their obligations under international agreements.

A race closer than it looks

Despite Donald Trump's disastrous post-convention performance, the presidential race is closer than it appears. While polls show he has decidedly and deservedly lost ground to Hillary Clinton, they tell only half the story. The other half is turnout. Looking at both, it becomes clear why Mrs. Clinton wants this race over before Nov. 8.

How togas and bikinis meet in California

Classic movie sets apart, California, that byword for the cutting-edge trendsetting contemporary in so many spheres, and the world of ancient Greece and the Roman Empire would seem to have little in common.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks during a rally in Kissimmee, Fla., Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016. (Loren Elliott/Tampa Bay Times via AP)

Trump's trump card may be his view on America

- The Washington Times

Although Donald Trump is trailing Hillary Clinton in most head-to-head matchups and is getting berated by the media and GOP establishment on a daily basis, one statistic is holding true: Americans feel he has a better sense of what's happening in the world than Mrs. Clinton.

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks a group of pastors at the Orlando Convention Center, Thursday, Aug. 11, 2016, in Orlando, Fla. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

Moving closer to 'Clexit'

First there was Brexit, when Great Britain shook up the global establishment by following through on a dare to exit the European Union. Now a movement is building that would further stun the supranationalists: an exit from the United Nations climate change protocol, dubbed "Clexit." (Not very imaginative, but sloganeers are rarely original.)

Illustration on biased journalism's impact on liberty by Linas Garys/the Washington Times

Journalism's double standard

Every time a David Duke or some other marginal Klan-connected or neo-Nazi lowlife crawls out from under a rock and gratuitously endorses Donald Trump (or anyone else, particularly a Republican or a conservative), the mainstream media call breathless attention to the news. They further demand that Mr. Trump or the other endorsee renounce the unsolicited and unwanted endorsement.